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richardp
May 13th, 2004, 10:10
Is anybody else else definitely going to visit the Peace Park at Hiroshima ( http://www.pcf.city.hiroshima.jp/peacesite/indexE.html ) :?:
I finally got to watch the Days That Shook the World ( http://www.bbc.co.uk/bbcfour/documentaries/features/days-hiroshima.shtml ) that was about this again today, it's been ages since it was first on. Even though I was watching this for the second time, it still shook me up a bit :cry: It tells the story of the bombing from the soldier's who dropped the a-bomb's perspective and from the perspecive of four Japanese people who lived at various points from the epicenter of the blast. The BBC did a really good job of this and it doesn't go into who's fault it was, but just tries to present the facts of what happened.
Even though I've seen and read a lot of information on what happened and why it happened, I still don't have a strong opinion on whether it was right or wrong. In fact I think it's an impossible question to answer, but almost 200000 people have died as a result of the bombing, which I believe makes it the single most destructive event ever to have happened :( So I'm pretty determined at some point to go and visit the peace park and museum, not out of curiosity but to pay my respects and maybe spend a moment hoping something similar will never happen again :cry:

theangelkiller
May 13th, 2004, 12:38
if you're really into it, there's a couple books that are pretty good reads:
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Hersey, John. Hiroshima. Vintage Books, 1989.

Hein, Laura and Mark Selden, eds. Living with the Bomb: American and Jpanese Cultural Conflicts in the Nuclear Age.

Selden, Kyoko and Mark Selden, eds. The Atomic Bomb: Voices from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. M.E. Sharpe, 1991.

Treat, John. Writing Ground Zero: Japanese Literature and the Atomic Bomb. U. of Chicago Press, 1996.

Ibuse, Masuji. Black Rain. Kodansha America. 1988.

Gar Alperovitz, The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth (N.Y.: Knopf, 1995)

Kai Bird and Lawrence Lifschultz, eds. Hiroshima's Shadow: Writings on the Denial of History and the Smithsonian Controversy (Stony Creek, Ct.: Pamphleteer's Press, 1998)

Hibakusha: Survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (Tokyo: Kosei Publishing Co., 1986)

Oe Kenzaburo, ed. The Crazy Iris and Other Stories of the Atomic Aftermath (N.Y.: Grove Press, 1985
--
sorry if it seems like a lot -- this is something i've studied before, so a lot of things came to mind--an entire genre of japanese literature is dedicated to the bomb, so there's a real buttload out there. let me know if you know of anything that was particularly interesting to you so i can check it out!
-m

WuTAN
May 13th, 2004, 16:47
i plan on going to memorials at both nagasaki and hiroshima. 200,000 people lost their lives in the blink of an eye and tens of thousands of others have suffered the after-effects of the radiation... there is no doubt that it was the most destructive event in human history. i'm not sure how i will contain my emotions when i'm physically at the memorial sites...

richardp
May 13th, 2004, 19:22
i plan on going to memorials at both nagasaki and hiroshima. 200,000 people lost their lives in the blink of an eye and tens of thousands of others have suffered the after-effects of the radiation... there is no doubt that it was the most destructive event in human history. i'm not sure how i will contain my emotions when i'm physically at the memorial sites...

It was IIRC much less than that, I believe 45000 people lost their life in 1 millionth of a second at hiroshima and the current number is up near 200000. I believe the total for Nagasaki stands at something like 80000 people :o

There are some emotive pictures taken after the events at Nagasaki here http://www.exploratorium.edu/nagasaki/ , some of them are very very moving :cry: I defintely plan to visit both sites at some point and if I'm placed in Chugoku or Kyushu I'll probably go more than once.

dobharrison
May 13th, 2004, 19:58
Hiroshima was my second choice so fingers crossed!

I will definitely try to visit, though - my dad would kill me if I didn't!

philmine1
May 13th, 2004, 20:33
Count me in dude.

yabighoor
May 14th, 2004, 04:44
Hey i'll be going as well

Canuck
May 14th, 2004, 07:33
I'll definitly be going at some point.

hkmercredi
May 14th, 2004, 09:52
The school I was at this summer took the American students to Hiroshima on July 4 - a very hard place to be proud of your country. It really hit me pretty deeply, and I do recommend it to everyone. All the same, though, I do want to go to Hiroshima again, but I want to see the castle and the gardens and all the things Hiroshima is known for aside from the atomic bomb. I want to remember it for things other than death.

dobharrison
May 14th, 2004, 17:19
If I get placed near Hiroshima I'll be very happy! I've heard it's a lovely city and the trams sound delightful.

JenrYOKO
May 17th, 2004, 15:59
Hiroshima is an incredibly easy city to get to and navigate! Everyone should definitely try to get there! (And there's stuff nearby like Miyajima Island in case you're worried about the Peace Park stuff being too depressing.)

topsterloin
May 17th, 2004, 16:06
have any of you seen the pics that a photographer shot of one of the cities (can't remember) a day or two after the bombing? truly terrifying and very moving...one i remember very clearly was of a boy maybe 12/13 carrying his brother on his back through the rubble

on a side note, did anybody realize that the point of contact for the bombs was labelled "ground zero"? that's what the former wtc site is referred to now in america...

Ageha
May 17th, 2004, 23:41
on a side note, did anybody realize that the point of contact for the bombs was labelled "ground zero"? that's what the former wtc site is referred to now in america...

It's generally what the center of similar disasters is (in my experience) called. We (America) seemed to have adopted it as the official title of the former WTC site.

As for the OP, I too plan on going to the Peace Park in Hiroshima. I've already been once, but I hope to go back during my stay in Japan. It really made quite an impression on me, to the extent that I left a poem I wrote about it for school at the church not far from the WTC site. For the past year, I've been working on and off to fold 1,000 origami cranes, hopefully to leave at the monument dedicated to Sadako. How I'm going to get them there I'm not sure, but at least I have a friend who lives relatively close to the city.