PDA

View Full Version : Kanji, how do you study them?



Mindflux
February 20th, 2009, 11:45
My current methods are: Nothing.

I did the first 500 kanji in heisig before I got here. That was helpful.
Now I write kanji on my flash cards on the English side. Surprisingly good at getting me to recognize some kanji for doing no real studying of them. Can even write some of them from that.

I could use a real method for learning Kanji though.

Please don't have another useless heisig debate. I'm already well aware of that method so give me other ideas. How do you study kanji and what sets did you learn first etc.

jonesinjapan
February 20th, 2009, 12:00
I found www.speedanki.com (http://www.speedanki.com) works pretty well granted I have only been using it for the past two weeks, but I know about 80% of the JLPT kanji now

Mr. Plainview
February 20th, 2009, 12:02
via iphone = win

Sorccy
February 20th, 2009, 12:52
Okay, it's boring and it may not be helpful for a lot of people, but what I find helps me is just to write them. Over. And over. I've printed out some sheets with all of the kanji I've studied so far. On the left, there's a column with the kanji, next, the meaning in English, and then colums with the readings. I can fold back 1 or two sides, and try to write the kanji from the meanings or readings, and then check what I came up with by looking at the kanji in the left column. Far from high-tech, but it helps me remember them through practice.

http://www.geocities.jp/mutasanjp/print/01nensei/index_kokugo.html This site is also good. It has sheets with each kanji (the kyoiku kanji-- how it's taught to students here in Japan by grade), the readings, and then boxes below for you to first trace and then write the kanji on your own. It's kind of nice. The 4 page print-outs under "D" are the ones I've been using, but there are a lot of other practice sheets there as well (including reading with fill-in-the-blank and more). This is just the 1st grade page. On the left, you can access grades 1-6.

Finally, for the "high tech" side of things, maybe this has already been mentioned a million times, but I think Kanji Gold is a nice program so far. I haven't been using it for very long. One nice thing though, is that you can turn on "pop kanji" (I think that's the right feature) and it'll open two windows, one with the kanji, and one with the meaning and readings. You can drag these down into a bottom corner on your screen, and they'll stay above the other windows, popping up with new kanji every few seconds (you can set the delay yourself). I think it might be nice to have them sitting there all the time, so you're constantly seeing them. You can get it here: http://web.uvic.ca/kanji-gold/

Don't know if any of this will be helpful. It's just how I've been doing things.

Yeti99
February 20th, 2009, 13:09
Okay, it's boring and it may not be helpful for a lot of people, but what I find helps me is just to write them. Over. And over.

That's what I do too. Not the most efficient way, and it certainly isn't for everyone, but for me, it's the most effective way.

UPGRAYEDD
February 20th, 2009, 13:12
I use a book called 'Kanji in Context' and the computer flash card software 'anki'.

The book is broken down into chapters of usually 10-15 kanji. Along with the kanji are compounds which use the kanji and there is a workbook you can buy which shows you common usage of the compounds and example sentences. The book is really high on reinforcement. Hundreds of compounds are repeated as new kanji are added.

Let me show an example.

The Kanji 飛ぶ(とぶ)-To fly
This kanji is listed in chapter 12 as kanji number 295. The following words are under the kanji.
飛び出す(とびだす)(出す is kanji 185)
飛行機 (ひこうき)(行 is previously learned)(機 has not yet been introduced but we see it again as Kanji 334)
飛行場(ひこうじょう)(場 is new too but not learned with 飛 and is introduced right after 機 as number 335)

So when you first learn a kanji like 飛 you learn the verb 飛ぶ immediatly and get an introduction to 飛行機 and 飛行場 which is also a first introduction to 機 and 場 which come up again a few chapters in the future. The whole book is like this and you get constant repetition of vocabulary. I highly recommend it.

I try to do a chapter a day from this book. First I write the kanji about 20 times to get a good feel for the stroke order. Then I write the compounds associated with that kanji but I sometimes skip kanji that have not been introduced yet. Then I input the compounds that the book deems important to know (they mark words that are considered rare or difficult) into anki and try to fit in an hour a day to reviewing with anki old words.

Avocado
February 20th, 2009, 23:34
I normally just study kanji out of textbooks, but when I'm bored and looking to switch it up I use Read The Kanji (http://www.readthekanji.com/) just to test myself on some compounds that'll show up on the test. It's not ideal for learning kanji, but it's fun and help passes the time (plus it's web-based, which means that you can sign into your account on any computer).

Upgrayedd, where did you get the Kanji in Context book? I'm looking to start some more in-depth self study and it seems pretty good. I've heard, though, that it can be pretty hard to find and somewhat expensive (?). One textbook and two workbooks, right?

mattyjaddy
February 20th, 2009, 23:42
Heisig worked for me. You might give it another go.

;)

GoddessCarlie
February 21st, 2009, 05:50
I'm using Heisig to remember how to write it and to give me an arbitrary idea of what the kanji represents. I use 2001 Kanji Odyssey to learn different readings for the kanji. I think KO is like Kanji in Context, but I'm not sure. KO presents kanji in order of how often they are used in newspapers, I believe, and presents different sentences of the different readings, usually three sentences per kanji. I'm using Anki to help me study them.

wicket
February 21st, 2009, 06:15
Kakitori-kun on the Nintendo DS.
I love that little chicken.

Ses
February 21st, 2009, 06:19
Tuttle Kanji Flashcards.
Perfect for breaking learning down into chunks. I always carry a few with me and once I know some of them really well: replace them with new ones.
Theres about 400-500 cards per box (theres 4 boxes covering the joyo kanji list).
Each card has the character; 4 common compounds, the readings, stroke order and even references to other kanji dictionaries/books.

Wakatta
February 21st, 2009, 09:53
Kakitori-kun on the Nintendo DS.
I love that little chicken.

The little chicken is so condescending!

It's like six pages of 頑張って.

I WANT TO COOK HIM.

AliDimayev
February 21st, 2009, 10:22
I just write them down and use them.

Avocado
February 21st, 2009, 11:01
I just write them down and use them.
That contributed a lot, thanks.

Ses, have you ever used the White Rabbit Press cards? A review on Amazon of the Tuttle cards directed me there and they look quite good (at least they appeal to me more because they don't use romaji).

AliDimayev
February 21st, 2009, 11:02
OK. I have the Nelson Kanji dictionary. I take a new charcahter write it down 100 times, make a flash card, and try to learn some compounds with it.

UPGRAYEDD
February 21st, 2009, 12:51
I normally just study kanji out of textbooks, but when I'm bored and looking to switch it up I use Read The Kanji (http://www.readthekanji.com/) just to test myself on some compounds that'll show up on the test. It's not ideal for learning kanji, but it's fun and help passes the time (plus it's web-based, which means that you can sign into your account on any computer).

Upgrayedd, where did you get the Kanji in Context book? I'm looking to start some more in-depth self study and it seems pretty good. I've heard, though, that it can be pretty hard to find and somewhat expensive (?). One textbook and two workbooks, right?

I found the book at kinokunya and bought the first workbook from amazon.jp. I haven't bought the second workbook yet because I'm not up to that many kanji yet.

American amazon sells the book for 50+ and the workbook 75+ but at the Japanese amazon site you can get it for 3,000 and 2,500 for the first workbook.

Urthona
February 21st, 2009, 13:02
You can also get Kanji in Context from your local bookstore if they have a section for learning Japanese.

It is a really useful textbook - just hope to god that anki doesn't crash and wipe out your cards when you get to around lesson 60 or 70 making you have to reenter the whole damn lot and realize that you will get crazy amounts of cards that need to be reviewed.

Yeti99
February 21st, 2009, 13:33
That contributed a lot, thanks.

Ses, have you ever used the White Rabbit Press cards? A review on Amazon of the Tuttle cards directed me there and they look quite good (at least they appeal to me more because they don't use romaji).

I've got volume one & two of the White Rabbit kanji cards. I quite like them. I highly recommend them.

Avocado
February 21st, 2009, 14:52
Hmm...I didn't know that speedanki was solely online, thought that there was a downloadable client. I usually make my own flashcards on my computer and use Mnemosyne (http://www.mnemosyne-proj.org/) (another program that utilizes some special algorythm that spaces out when you need to redo a card) to learn vocab, kanji, etc. It seems pretty similar to anki except that you make cards on any subject and don't have to be online to use it.

Thanks for the tip on where to find the book! There are some larger bookstores in my area, I'll have to check to see if they have them :)

Gusuke
February 21st, 2009, 15:33
Rote memorization works me, and I'm also playing a DS game to practice for the 漢検.

Ses
February 21st, 2009, 17:10
Ses, have you ever used the White Rabbit Press cards? A review on Amazon of the Tuttle cards directed me there and they look quite good (at least they appeal to me more because they don't use romaji).

Just had a look at the White Rabbit ones and they do indeed look better.... the similar kanji bit makes me envious :(

Jcubed
February 21st, 2009, 21:14
I learned most my kanji in university classes and reviewed a lot of readings using "kanji flip" for the iPhone which is a space repetition program like anki. The interface is quite slick and I recommend it if you've got an iPhone.

I recently passed 2kyuu and I'm in the uncomfortable situation of being able to read ~1100 kanji but only being able to write ~300 (just a guess). Does anyone have any suggestions for such a situation? Maybe Heisig or some DS game, maybe even starting to write all my post it notes in Japanese? Any advice would be apprecipated, I'd try just about anything over simply writing each kanji ten times which bores me to death.

UPGRAYEDD
February 21st, 2009, 23:54
I would just go for 1kyuu. You don't really need to know how to write kanji.

Avocado
February 22nd, 2009, 00:12
I learned most my kanji in university classes and reviewed a lot of readings using "kanji flip" for the iPhone which is a space repetition program like anki. The interface is quite slick and I recommend it if you've got an iPhone.

I recently passed 2kyuu and I'm in the uncomfortable situation of being able to read ~1100 kanji but only being able to write ~300 (just a guess). Does anyone have any suggestions for such a situation? Maybe Heisig or some DS game, maybe even starting to write all my post it notes in Japanese? Any advice would be apprecipated, I'd try just about anything over simply writing each kanji ten times which bores me to death.
What I usually do is put the reading and meaning on one side of the flash card, and whenever it comes up I have to write it. It's not writing it over and over again, but it does force you to have to remember the compound.

Also, when I'm learning a kanji for the first time I'll just copy it dozens of times while watching tv or a movie so I can get a feel for it. I feel that as long as I'm multi-tasking it isn't incredibly boring. As long as I keep it up it works fine, I guess.

Yeti99
February 22nd, 2009, 00:41
I recently passed 2kyuu and I'm in the uncomfortable situation of being able to read ~1100 kanji but only being able to write ~300 (just a guess). .

I have this exact same problem. The only solution I can think of is just practice, but even that has its limits. I'm an awful speller in English, and I have piss-poor handwriting, which I view as two massive strikes against me being able write kanji off the top of my head. My Japanese teacher always tell me not to worry, because most Japanese people can't write a lot of kanji properly, but I think she is just being nice to me.

Jcubed
February 22nd, 2009, 11:07
I would just go for 1kyuu. You don't really need to know how to write kanji.

True, you don't need to be able to write kanji to pass the JLPT, which is precisely why I'm in the position I'm in now. Still, in order to live comfortably in Japan (for the long term) you need to be able to. Even in this age of cell phones and PCs you still have to hand write letters, notes for yourself or others, etc.

I can definitely see the logic to being able to read first then worry about writing. But I can't really see any point in going for 1kyuu unless you want to be in Japan for the long term (or do something very Japan related) in which case you'll really want to be write anyway. 1kyuu might get your foot in the door at some company but I doubt they'd be too impressed if you couldn't even properly take basic notes in Japanese.

UPGRAYEDD
February 22nd, 2009, 13:03
True, you don't need to be able to write kanji to pass the JLPT, which is precisely why I'm in the position I'm in now. Still, in order to live comfortably in Japan (for the long term) you need to be able to. Even in this age of cell phones and PCs you still have to hand write letters, notes for yourself or others, etc.

I can definitely see the logic to being able to read first then worry about writing. But I can't really see any point in going for 1kyuu unless you want to be in Japan for the long term (or do something very Japan related) in which case you'll really want to be write anyway. 1kyuu might get your foot in the door at some company but I doubt they'd be too impressed if you couldn't even properly take basic notes in Japanese.

That is what dictionaries are for. I don't see any valid reason to sweat learning how to write kanji when you can use a dictionary to quickly see the kanji. Plus no one at a Japanese company is going to look down on a foreigner using a dictionary in a company meeting.

Eventually, after years of use, the kanji will start improving.

AliDimayev
February 22nd, 2009, 16:59
Even many Japanese are not that great at writing kanji. The more you write the better you will become at writing them. As the advertisement I saw on a train said:

MOTTE TE DE KAKOU!

AliDimayev
February 22nd, 2009, 16:59
*motto not motte. My bad.

katsudon
February 25th, 2009, 08:53
My kanji learning strategy at the moment is just to write them out as I come across them. I'm using the site http://www.iknow.co.jp for vocabulary building and whenever the drill comes up with a cue that ISN'T the kanji, I'll write the kanji before I answer it, then check my kanji.

I sometimes do more targeted kanji study from this book that has the kanji in contextual situations with self-made flashcards.

I also did about 500 of heisig which was great but got boring.

My main kanji strategy though is to concentrate on the shape and form of a new kanji before I move on. So in my doraemon gakushuu manga when I come across somethin new I look at it, understand it, write it, and move on.

I have some crazy memory though lately...I saw my boyfriend's kanji for the first time in his living room on some old art from middle school, then impressed him by writing it out 4 hours after that time from memory.

Wakatta
February 25th, 2009, 19:24
I'm going to toss this link out here again:

http://lrnj.com/

Slime Forest. It's Heisig-like in its approach, although it also provides the most basic on-yomi, which I think is a major improvement. Also, it includes stories for all of them, rather than making you think up your own. For some reason, I find I'm just not usually creative enough for that. After looking at what I think is the "real" Heisig mnemonic list, I also feel like these stories are just better.

I was really suspicious of this at first, but I am such a convert now. The sheer speed (and the durability of the retention) it allows is unmatched. I've been really working this lately, and I'm at like 50-100 a day with so far no major problems about forgetting. For writing practice, I'd rather use Kakitori-kun to make sure I get the stroke order right. With this, I just jot down the kanji as I learn them, with the basic on-yomi and the meaning. I then enter them into Anki for recognition practice.

Jcubed
February 27th, 2009, 15:18
That is what dictionaries are for. I don't see any valid reason to sweat learning how to write kanji when you can use a dictionary to quickly see the kanji. Plus no one at a Japanese company is going to look down on a foreigner using a dictionary in a company meeting.

Eventually, after years of use, the kanji will start improving.

Yeah, I suppose it comes down to personal preference. I my case, before diving into 1kyuu grammar, I've decided to learn to write kanji by hand. The basic skill of being able to write by hand without looking up every other kanji is more important to me for life in Japan than grammar essentially only used in academia and adult literature.

Anyway, I've started Heisig in my ample free time at school and it's going well so far (but only time will tell). Before I started, I could have read something like 砂 no problem but I couldn't have written it (at least not with any confidence it was correct), but the story of (paraphrasing) "STONES are FEW in the SAND of a good beach" really seems to be a good way to remember how to write it. There are many kanji that look quite similar so really need to remember the exact radical/"primitive" that goes into the kanji; these stories really seem to help.

dombay
February 27th, 2009, 17:49
Writing kanji is relaxing.

When I'm on the phone with my mum or just killing a bit of time reading forums at work i'll often have my kanji notebook out and just be writing kanji out over and over again - either simplified Chinese, Japanese or traditional Chinese.

It drills them into your head too. A bit like a pin number. If someone said to me 'what's you're pin number' i'd have to think about it. But in front of a number pad I just drill it in because my hand is used to going in that pattern.

So when I want to write 轢くor something like that I just go with where my hand takes me and I'm rarely wrong.

Jcubed
February 27th, 2009, 18:59
So when I want to write 轢くor something like that I just go with where my hand takes me and I'm rarely wrong.

Damn, impressive. I didn't even know that verb yet alone the kanji. I'll
remember it next time I get angry. 轢くぞ、お前!:lol:

dombay
February 27th, 2009, 21:11
That's my favourite kanji.

It's one of those visual ones that makes so much sense without running to Heisig in tears.

Wakatta
February 27th, 2009, 22:02
That's my favourite kanji.

It's one of those visual ones that makes so much sense without running to Heisig in tears.

I read this, zoomed in to look at the kanji, and LOL'd.

kiwimusume
March 2nd, 2009, 21:41
If someone said to me 'what's you're pin number' i'd have to think about it.

Hey dombay, what's your pin number? And while you're at it, can I borrow your card? :p

(I do get what you mean, though. The more I think about it, the more likely I am to forget how to write it.)

Wakatta
March 3rd, 2009, 20:46
Hey dombay, what's your pin number? And while you're at it, can I borrow your card? :p

(I do get what you mean, though. The more I think about it, the more likely I am to forget how to write it.)

Start at 1:15 or so
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8v2mEg9Cpvs

Gezora
March 4th, 2009, 19:56
Writing them out repeatedly helped me in college, but that was when I used to only have to know about twenty or thirty per test or quiz.

I've got kanji gold on my school laptop. Does it exist on Mac?

I use Read the Kanji as well.

I went out and bought the White Rabbit cards, but I haven't started a good regiment with them...

katsudon
March 5th, 2009, 01:25
See I saw the white rabbit cards and didn't like them. I like to partition out my study more than that though. They present too much info at once for my liking.

AliDimayev
March 8th, 2009, 15:22
I write the cangee on a piece of a paper and then I eat it.

euphoriafish
March 31st, 2009, 06:24
I'm using iKnow, which just became smart.fm, in Kanji mode. I'm just focusing on learning to read right now though. When I want to practice writing, I either use my tablet to scribble them out in Photoshop, or I break out the pen and paper, or I turn on the DS and drill them with 漢検DS.

PurpleDrank
April 10th, 2009, 17:34
I use anki (http://ichi2.net/anki/).

It's a flash card softward that works offline and on.

I like it because there's a shit load of premade decks (http://ichi2.net/anki/wiki/PreMadeDecks)I can use....and it's free :)

Wanderlust King
April 10th, 2009, 22:16
Memorizing the different readings definitely does not work for me. What does is learning new vocabulary, and forcing myself to learn its corresponding kanji at the same time. So when I learned the word for red, I learned the kanji for red, for example.

The good thing about this method is that the more vocabulary you learn, the more you see kanji repeat themselves, and you eventually do learn the jist of the individual readings.

It just seems so much more helpful than learning the 15+ readings for 上.

wicket
April 10th, 2009, 22:18
I do that, too Wanderlust, but you can kind of combine the methods. So learn 上 as 'ue' meaning upper or on top, but then find other kanji that use it and learn the meanings of those, too.

enigmaneo
April 13th, 2009, 11:49
I don't see the point in studying the readings. I think just remembering the words will help you learn the readings.

Urthona
April 13th, 2009, 11:54
I've found that in combination with using Kanji in Context, just playing video games like FF7. I look up the kanji/vocab I don't know and write it down a couple of times. The amount of times you see the kanji really helps drill them in.

Victorius~
April 16th, 2009, 09:54
That's what I do too. Not the most efficient way, and it certainly isn't for everyone, but for me, it's the most effective way.

Always a great way to commit something to motor-memory. I feel comfortable writing any new kanji now and can get the correct stroke order 95% of the time. I'm not too big on notecards, myself. I find that the more kanji I learn the easier it is to learn new ones. Just keep working hard!
Although it's pretty tough, the kanji game for DS "200 Mannin no KanKen Tokoton Kanji Nou" is fun and covers reading and writing in a cool series of activities.

Avocado
April 16th, 2009, 19:47
Okay, so I just went ahead and dropped 6,500 on the three Kanji in Context books, now I just have to find a good way to study them. I would just make flashcards, etc, but I also want memorize the meanings (good vocab practice) and how to write them (just because it's helpful). I currently know ~800 or so, and would also like to cement those firmly in my brain.

Any tips? I would try to do what the guy from nihongoperapera did, but I also want to have a life... Looking to pass 2-kyuu this December :)

UPGRAYEDD
April 16th, 2009, 21:31
Read the workbook. Make flashcards. Practice writing. Make your own sentences. Etc etc

Victorius~
April 17th, 2009, 09:46
2-kyu will require a strong command of around 1000 and an awareness of a couple hundred more. Like I said somewhere else, I love using WordChamp to help me memorize kanji for reading's sake, and it reads off a lot of them, too, so you can get an audio sample in your head to help remember. But diligence and basic practice work best for practicing writing. You just gotta use what works best for you.

Urthona
April 17th, 2009, 10:22
Okay, so I just went ahead and dropped 6,500 on the three Kanji in Context books, now I just have to find a good way to study them. I would just make flashcards, etc, but I also want memorize the meanings (good vocab practice) and how to write them (just because it's helpful). I currently know ~800 or so, and would also like to cement those firmly in my brain.

Any tips? I would try to do what the guy from nihongoperapera did, but I also want to have a life... Looking to pass 2-kyuu this December :)

I use a combo of anki for making flashcards and writing in notebooks for the cards. I found that writing out the sentences really helps with reading comprehension and remembering the words. That being said, I usually don't bother writing out the sentences if the word is something I know backwards and forwards already. It takes forever to go through chapters though.

Example sentences are really useful though. The grammar is pretty simple and the vocab word here is "弁解" (explain, justify, excuse)
Here is an example one: 仕事の上で弁解ばかりしている奴は、将来見込みがない。
私は彼が選挙で勝つと確信しています is for 確信

Andrew101
April 17th, 2009, 12:12
I used the site Reviewing the Kanji (http://www.kanji.koohii.com/) when I worked my way through Heisig's book.

UPGRAYEDD
April 17th, 2009, 13:21
What is wordchamp?

Victorius~
April 17th, 2009, 14:49
WordChamp (http://www.wordchamp.com/lingua2/Home.do)is a free for students and teachers of language website that lets you create your own flashcards online. Specializing in multiple languages, It has a huge database of vocabulary and kanji, many of which have audio clips with pronunciation, that makes it easy to create personal lists. It also has various drills associated with those cards, such as entering the correct meaning of a Japanese word or phrase OR entering the correct translation of an English term. It also can create printable lists of the vocab you want and makes it easy to print your own custom flashcards. I don't use all the features, but I have experimented with them all, and I find it a truly awesome resource for the independent student.

UPGRAYEDD
April 17th, 2009, 15:11
Compared to mnemosyne or anki how to you think it stands up?

Victorius~
April 17th, 2009, 17:44
Well, WordChamp is an almost completely web-based resource and has a database updated by a large network of users, including language professors, teachers, and tutors that you can search and try and partner up with, but at the same time is easily accessible and usable on a personal level for independent study.

There is no methodology behind the creation and use of flashcards over a period of time to reinforce memorization as is the case with anki, and it isn't a portable database like mnemosyne. They are great tools, too.

I haven't used them enough to really rank their effectiveness, but that's kind of moot anyway since I truly feel independent learning is case-by-case. I find it easier to create the flashcards I'm looking for with WordChamp. They have a lot of great suggestions whenever you type in the English or Japanese you want to create a flashcard of. So, it works well for me~

Kinda PC answer, I guess ┐('~`;)┌

dombay
April 17th, 2009, 19:10
Speedanki is good. There are some good DS games as well. Writing them out over and over again is the best but boring.

If you live near a book store like Maruzen look for a book with a red cover called Basic Kanji Book I. This is an amazing kanji textbook and then you move on to Basic Kanji Book II which is sort of Tourquoise and then Intermediate Kanij I and II which are orange and green. Great textbooks but you need to keep up with your grammar as well if you want them to make sense.

UPGRAYEDD
April 17th, 2009, 22:19
These are the kind of notes I've been taking lately. Kind of been looking at the history and components of the kanji instead of just straight memorization. It's working out good so far as far as retaining memory.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3611/3449424677_b0024bbefc.jpg
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3329/3449425485_e938345636.jpg

Avocado
April 19th, 2009, 23:52
What I've always tended to do with Kanji is cram for a test the night before, ace the test, and then proceed to forget everything I learned (which is usual, right...?). Even though this is kind of sucky, it does make it really easy for me to learn it the second - or third - time through, when it usually sticks for good.

If I'm really drilling myself on certain kanji (reading/writing/whatever), I'll plug it into Mnemosyne and sit there for hours rewriting each character or combo until I can go through all of them (usually 30-100) without making a mistake. For the cram-forget-cram-learn system, this is usually pretty good, although I can definitely see why that wouldn't work for some people...

enigmaneo
April 19th, 2009, 23:56
I eat Kanji alphabet soup.

Urthona
April 20th, 2009, 08:56
http://perapera.wordpress.com/2009/03/16/kanji-in-context-anki-file/

This is all the vocab from Kanji in context, tagged by chapter and section with the English translation of the word. The file doesn't include the sentences from the book but it can save time from inputting it and it is cleanly done.

Wakatta
April 20th, 2009, 17:02
Fun game I play sometimes: kanji shiritori. E.g.,

例文
文法
法律
。。。

I usually let myself check in a dictionary every now and then.

You could probably also play it with homophones.

seifip
June 20th, 2009, 02:03
You may want to try my recently released Japanese educational game NihongoUp... It can improve one’s kana typing speed as well as help one review the kanji, vocab and particles.

Learn Japanese the fun way (http://nihongoup.com/) - NihongoUp