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Phoenix
April 11th, 2009, 05:58
So everyone who isn't deadset on going to Japan seems to be thinking South Korea. Just curious if anyone else is thinking about any other countries. I had an interview a couple days ago with a school in Taiwan and if they accept me I'm going (well unless JET upgrades me first). Another friend is heading off to Thailand. Just wanted to hear about other people's thoughts and plans.
If anyone ends up in Taiwan we should hang out!

mteacher80
April 11th, 2009, 07:09
I worked in China for a year, after studying at Beijing U. I really enjoyed it, however one or two years there was enough for me. Since i was there in 2001-2002 they have raised the pay of ALT type jobs but not that much. I was making about 400USD a month from my full time job and about 200 from my private jobs, which in china ment i could live in a great apartment, use taxis to go everywhere. go to the best clubs and even head to hong kong at least once a month (i lived in shenzhen in southern china) however i was only able to save about $1200 after a year and when i took a trip to japan to visit friends i totaly wiped out my half a year savings.
The teachers and students were great and actualy the level of english even at the elementary school i worked at was leaps and bounds better than jhs and hs here.
what program did you apply through to go to taiwan?

AliDimayev
April 11th, 2009, 08:02
I went to Taiwan for 3 months before. I loved it! i don't know about teaching there or anything....

Phoenix
April 11th, 2009, 10:39
Mark- thats why I'm thinking Taiwain and not China. I know you make enough to live on in China, but I want to save a little and I do have student loans. I actually studied at Beijing U too!! Just for a semester but it was a lot of fun. And I would be going through Reach to Teach if I get accepted to Taiwan.

Saitaman
April 13th, 2009, 20:43
I would vote Taiwan, but I would like to see China ssoon.

AliDimayev
April 13th, 2009, 20:45
Taiwan is the real China, without the communisit propaganda. For example my friend who has moved from China to US 8 years ago to go to school has not set foot back in China and has no intention to.

Saitaman
April 13th, 2009, 22:00
Taiwan is the real China, without the communisit propaganda. For example my friend who has moved from China to US 8 years ago to go to school has not set foot back in China and has no intention to.

They are more capatalist than we are these days.

jboze84
April 15th, 2009, 08:22
Capitalism |= democracy!

UPGRAYEDD
April 15th, 2009, 08:55
what is that double perpendicular?

cvmurrieta
April 15th, 2009, 09:28
I have considered Taiwan

puma
April 15th, 2009, 12:22
what is that double perpendicular?

a genuine fuckup, i reckon

Neb
April 15th, 2009, 13:42
haha, i think he means != which obviously means ≠

dombay
April 17th, 2009, 19:02
I love China. I think you can have a really amazing experience in China in one of many really awesome cities that are completely different to Japan.

I personally did China before I did Japan and I wouldn't change that now. While you're young China is an awesome place. When you get older I think Japan is more comfortable but as a young person I think China can be a really great place.

I think that's because you have to put more effort into China. Now I kind of like Japan I think because it takes less effort but straight out of uni before you get a bit set in your ways I think China might be better and then branch out to Japan.

Some places I would consider in China would be Hangzhou, Shanghai and Guangzhou (Canton) or Shenzhen. The latter two are complete holes but they're very close to Hong Kong which is the world's most awesome city and very easy to hang out in from them. Hangzhou is very close to Shanghai and you get there on the train in a couple of hours for weekend but Hangzhou is a great city in its own right. Shanghai is Shanghai and is a whole rainbow of amazing. Sometimes annoying but on the whole one of the world's great cities.

nicklar
April 18th, 2009, 00:51
I spent nearly 6 years in Shanghai. Amazing place. However we just went back for a week and it's gotten a lot more expensive. Also, the place does wear you down a bit (you end up walking around with constant low-level agression), plus the pollution is crazy. I'm feeling like crap now after getting some awful chest infection.

Sun Kil Moon
April 18th, 2009, 04:41
I've always wanted to try Taiwan, but I taught in China for a bit and I agree strongly with the couple of posts above me, it's awesome.

I was teaching in Jiaxing, about 1 hour south of Shanghai and 1 hour north of Hangzhou(train costs only $2 Canadian or something crazy like that).

I can say as a caucasian english teacher, I was treated like royalty there. No word of a lie I paid for about 2 beers in my total time out at the clubs and bars. I remember my first time in a club I ordered my first beer, and a waiter came over to me telling me in bad english that the boss was 'very pleased' and motioning to follow him. So I followed him, was sat down beside the owner of the club, owner pours himself a drink, me a drink, drinks his and shows me the empty glass--and voila! A new friendship is born :)

Everytime I went to that club I paid for nothing, just danced and chilled with the owner, was taken out to dinner after the club closed, etc etc.

The other bars I went to I would have at least someone come over and set me up with drinks, or one guy even who was trying to set me up with a girl who was singing on stage.

Aside from that hospitality that I experienced, China is a very misjudged country that has a lot of good to offer. It's not everyone's cup of tea but I found it beautiful and welcoming.

My only warnings would be that
A) I found a TON of racism towards black people in my area, and the people couldn't really tell me why. Everyone told me they had never seen a black person except on TV, but on TV they seemed scary. However, just an hour north in Shanghai there's a lot more multiculturalism so it problem isn't a problem there.

B) It can be pretty dirty some places, and you have to get used to it. I had a conversation with a friend there about all the spitting that goes on, and horking on the streets--they told me that Chairman Mao was someone that a lot of people looked up to, and even in interviews with presidents, Mao would have a bucket to hork into. So the Chinese people didn't see it as a problem.

C) Although the people in china I met were the nicest, most helpful, generous people I have met(moreso than the people I met in all my travels to Cuba, Tokyo, California, all across Canada)------they haven't been taught many manners(at least where I was)
Constantly you'll have people budding in front of you for line ups, waving cash at the cashier, driving is scary as shit with stop signs being pretty optional, people will hork infront of you or cough nice and openly etc.

Moneywise, China is a great place to go if you have no debts back home, don't care about making tons of money to take home, but LOVE being able to spend spend spend and buy whatever you want for super cheap. My wage was 7000RMB a month which is only $1000 a month canadian(not much at all)...but in China the average wage was 2000RMB where I was...so..yeah...I could buy a ton of stuff and still have money left over easy.

Sorry for the long, jumbled post :)

vdog
April 18th, 2009, 06:50
haha, i think he means != which obviously means ≠

Is it that obvious? I first learned "!=" with computer programming, has it entered the internet vernacular similarly to "/thread"??

@Ali, why were you in Taiwan?

AliDimayev
April 18th, 2009, 06:51
My friend has relatvies there. So we went there for the vacation.

Phoenix
April 27th, 2009, 13:32
Well I've been offered a position in Taiwan and I'm planning on accepting it. So good-bye JET. If anyone else is interested in Taiwan you should apply to Reach to Teach. They have a good rep. PM me if you have questions about Taiwan. :)

Neb
April 27th, 2009, 13:34
What are the perks (and downside)? (pay, rent, living expenses, teaching environment.. every other thing)

mteacher80
April 27th, 2009, 13:37
http://reachtoteachrecruiting.com/
it was easy to look up
Teach English in Taiwan - The Benefits of an ESL job

The moment you land in Taiwan, your host school will be waiting to greet you. The benefits of an ESL job teaching English in Taiwan will include the following:


A monthly salary of between NT$ 50,000-70,000+ (Currency Converter) (http://reachtoteachrecruiting.com/banking_in_taiwan.html)
Up to four weeks vacation
Airport pickup
Assistance in finding permanent apartment a to your liking
Temporary housing for your first few weeks in Taiwan (if necessary)
An ARC (working visa to legally teach English in Taiwan)
Health insurance coverage
At Reach To Teach, we support you throughout your year (or more!) teaching English in Taiwan

cvmurrieta
April 27th, 2009, 14:11
I got a Skype interview with Reach To Teach next Monday at 9:30am. That is how I will spend part of my Golden Week.

woscarin
April 30th, 2009, 04:53
For JETs in Japan who want to go on a short trip to China, how do you go about that? Is it possible to apply for a visa in Japan to go to China?

Anyone gone to China during JET?

mteacher80
April 30th, 2009, 07:17
there are a few ways to go about it/ if you book your tickets through a travel agent they will usually processes your visa for you/ just send them your passport/

or if you only plan on visiting southern china i know you can fly into hong kong and then at the boarder you can get 1,3 or week long visas at the boarder/ then getting to0 shenzhen and guangzhou is really easy.

dombay
April 30th, 2009, 08:38
Many times.

Like Mark says but I'd like to add that you'll find it cheaper to go through a visa agency (unless you live in a city with a Chinese consulate). The travel agents will do it but they charge an exorbitant fee.

China's a great travel option from Japan though. Even regional airports often have scheduled flights to Beijing, Shanghai, Dalian and stuff.

Phoenix
November 17th, 2009, 00:42
Just wanted to stop by and say Hi! I've been teaching in Taiwan for the past 3 months and love it here. :)

cielya
November 17th, 2009, 06:29
I had looked into Hess International in Taiwan.

English Teachers | HESS EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION (http://www.hess.com.tw/careers/english/)

It's pretty competetive because after a year of teaching and attending infrequent seminars, you end up with a TEFL certificate which would help you get better employment later.

word
November 17th, 2009, 16:36
I had looked into Hess International in Taiwan.

English Teachers | HESS EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION (http://www.hess.com.tw/careers/english/)

It's pretty competetive because after a year of teaching and attending infrequent seminars, you end up with a TEFL certificate which would help you get better employment later.

Eh... a TEFL is kinda "meh." You can get one for a couple of hundred bucks and a little correspondence on the internet. Probably for less money and effort that that, actually. You DON'T get a TEFL cert from JET, but I guarantee most JETs will know quite a bit more about teaching English than your average TEFL cert holder.

mrfahrenheit
November 18th, 2009, 06:09
I had looked into Hess International in Taiwan.

English Teachers | HESS EDUCATIONAL ORGANIZATION (http://www.hess.com.tw/careers/english/)

It's pretty competetive because after a year of teaching and attending infrequent seminars, you end up with a TEFL certificate which would help you get better employment later.

My hope is to apply to Hess as plan B for JET. I have a professor that claims they're the only "real reputable English school" in Taiwan and that a lot of companies just screw you over. (<-- Pretty sure he had a bad experience himself.)

There aren't as many resources for teaching English in Taiwan as there are for Japan, but it really seems like a perfect alternative...

Plan C involves China. English Teaching Program in Shenzhen, China: CTLC (http://www.chinaprogram.org/) <-- This is a program a friend of mine is doing, and he loves it. But you have to pay a few thousand dollars to the company to enroll/get your visa/whatever? And paying money in order to get a job seems really sketch to me when you're not going through a recruiter or something. So... I don't know. :\

cielya
November 18th, 2009, 06:18
Plan C involves China. English Teaching Program in Shenzhen, China: CTLC (http://www.chinaprogram.org/) <-- This is a program a friend of mine is doing, and he loves it. But you have to pay a few thousand dollars to the company to enroll/get your visa/whatever? And paying money in order to get a job seems really sketch to me when you're not going through a recruiter or something. So... I don't know. :\

Sketch indeed. That should send up all kinds of red flags. Not even recruiters charge you for placements (the school should be the one paying the recruiter to find you, not the other way around). There's lots of other options that don't requrie scamming you, they just take a little extra looking sometimes.

The best advice a friend gave to me was - take your time; these schools need and want you and you have the ability to choose your school, program, whatever (even though some recruiters, websites, etc, might make it seem otherwise). You definitely don't want to get roped into a bad situation, but hey, if your friend is happy, maybe it cost something for a reason! Who knows?

Best of luck to you!

whispechoes
November 22nd, 2009, 10:26
HESS- the teaching in Taiwan program- is kind of a plan C or D for me right now. I read up on the place, and you seem to be able to make an okay amount of money for the area... and even lets you pay off student loans, assuming you don't have a ton of them.

China is more like plan D/E. I wouldn't mind going and teaching there for a year, but only after I've taken care of the majority of my loans... if I'm not tired of teaching by then, anyway.

mrfahrenheit
November 22nd, 2009, 10:54
Mind me asking what plan B is? Another program in Japan?

whispechoes
November 23rd, 2009, 12:12
I'll either apply to another teaching program in Japan, or apply to EPIK over in S. Korea. Or both. We'll see what happens, though.

Victorius~
November 25th, 2009, 13:00
I'm in South Korea right now and I was planning on traveling to China or Taiwan sometime in the spring. Do they have the same policies as Japan and Korea as far as visas go, or would I actrually hve to do something before I can go over there?

mteacher80
November 26th, 2009, 19:54
china for sure needs a visa!

Victorius~
November 27th, 2009, 10:50
china for sure needs a visa!
Thanks for the heads up~

theNogitsune
November 28th, 2009, 13:19
Why is everyone ignoring one key thing about teaching in Taiwan?

Foreigners are not allowed to teach kindergarten. It is illegal there and risk deportation for something really stupid.

We can teach any age above that. If you are with Hess, they have a way around it. They still may have you leave through the back door if there is a raid.

To avoid that all together you can choose contract A, in which you do not teach kindergarten at all.

That is what put me off to teaching in Taiwan. I like teaching kids, it is fun. It would spoil all the fun if I have to worry about being deported for doing my job.

DN

whispechoes
November 30th, 2009, 01:27
I've heard that you can pick up as many jobs as you'd like in Taiwan, though of course only one can give you the visa you need to work there. If I ever do need to work for Hess or another similar program, I'd bypass the teaching kindergarten deal, work contract A, and find some privates or something for extra income. I don't feel like playing tag with Taiwan officials. Something tells me that I'd lose.

3701
February 11th, 2010, 17:01
I'm also thinking about Taiwan after JET.
I know they prefer Caucasian but what's the ratio like? Is it as easy for Asians to get English teaching jobs?

Djordje
March 4th, 2010, 12:33
Thaiwan...they're less communist.

4564
March 10th, 2010, 12:41
Just a quick word of caution about Taiwan...the job market there is shit right now, especially if you want to work in Taipei. Many reputable language schools will ask you to do a free lesson for them as part of your interview to see how well you interact with the students and the material (with close to zero prep time). There are a lot who won't hire you without a demo lesson so applying from outside the country for jobs is a pain in the ass.

If you have certifications and lots of experience you might be totally fine, but I've been talking to a few friends there (since I'm considering my options as well) and they all say it's hard times finding steady work to pay the bills.

One guy is moving back to the States later this month because after pounding the pavement for four months he has let to land a single full time teaching job.

So just sure you know what you're getting in to before you pack up your life and fly there.