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puma
May 27th, 2009, 14:48
The hot teacher wants to do a lesson on classroom English with me after we play one of my games which should take 15-20 minutes tops.

I so far have made a sheet with English/Japanese vocabulary matching and English/Japanese useful phrases, which should take 15 mintues or so.

I need some type of partner activity/game that focuses on classroom English for first year high schoolers.

Ideas?

Coollead
May 27th, 2009, 14:55
For my first year junior high students (who are probably on the same level as your high school kids, if they need classroom english. I teach that stuff in Kindergarten here.), I played Simon Says. Its fun to watch them mess up.

If it's partners you need, put pictures on cards, and play Classroom English karuta!

puma
May 27th, 2009, 14:58
For my first year junior high students (who are probably on the same level as your high school kids, if they need classroom english. I teach that stuff in Kindergarten here.), I played Simon Says. Its fun to watch them mess up.

If it's partners you need, put pictures on cards, and play Classroom English karuta!

yeah partners, whats karuta

Coollead
May 27th, 2009, 15:15
Karuta is something nearly every Japanese kid enjoys.

For example, Alphabet Karuta:

You make 26 cards per group, (A-Z). Have each group spread out the cards on a desk, and then call out a letter. The kids grab the correct card. If they pick the wrong card, they have to give a card to the other person. Keep going until you run out of cards. You can also make up rules like "Keep your hands on your head" or "Only use your left hand" to add challenge.

For Classroom english Karuta, you do the same thing, except there's only pictures on the cards, and you say the phrase in English. The kids have to find the picture that matches up with the phrase.

AliDimayev
May 27th, 2009, 16:47
Puma, what game are you doing first?

puma
May 28th, 2009, 09:17
battleships since its unrelated

puma
May 28th, 2009, 09:18
Karuta is something nearly every Japanese kid enjoys.

For example, Alphabet Karuta:

You make 26 cards per group, (A-Z). Have each group spread out the cards on a desk, and then call out a letter. The kids grab the correct card. If they pick the wrong card, they have to give a card to the other person. Keep going until you run out of cards. You can also make up rules like "Keep your hands on your head" or "Only use your left hand" to add challenge.

For Classroom english Karuta, you do the same thing, except there's only pictures on the cards, and you say the phrase in English. The kids have to find the picture that matches up with the phrase.

maybe im a dumbass, but i need more explanation

Marrissey
May 28th, 2009, 15:23
Karuta would be ok, as long as you get them to practice pronouncing the English in the second activity. Given classroom English is stuff you want them to say, the second activity should probably be followed up with you giving some examples by saying some stuff and getting the students to try to use the appropriate phrase.

For example, when teaching classroom English I say to the students "please repeat: supercallifragulisticexpialodocious" - of course, they all crack up because it's impossible, but I tell them they should say "please speak slower" or "pardon". I generally try to do an example for each phrase to get them used to using it.

Wakatta
May 28th, 2009, 19:49
For classroom English, I support just teaching phrases and strongly relating it to actual activity. Less games and more, like, say, a "stand up/sit down" game...where they're supposed to listen and do what you -say-. (E.g., while they're standing, say, "Stand UP!" with a downward hand motion and the intonation you were using for "sit down".) Have them run around opening and closing whatever: books, doors, windows, etc. Teach them "raise your hand". Tell them to raise their books or raise their pencils, too. Etc. etc.

Marrissey
May 28th, 2009, 20:06
At Senior High School level they will know stand up / sit down etc.

You should be teaching them things like "I don't understand", "please speak more slowly", "I don't know", "how do you spell xyz" etc. - the sort of stuff that's on the covers of a lot of SHS textbooks.

ETA: ...but I agree with you that actually learning appropriate times to use each thing and how to use them is really important for classroom English.

Komadori
May 29th, 2009, 07:27
I'm not sure how long this has been out, but I saw a commercial for it the other day. I'm wondering how helpful it might be for SHS students:

http://www.boardgames.com/scslcaga.html

I'm tempted to bring a deck or two with me.

Marrissey
June 1st, 2009, 15:24
I'm not sure how long this has been out, but I saw a commercial for it the other day. I'm wondering how helpful it might be for SHS students:

http://www.boardgames.com/scslcaga.html

I'm tempted to bring a deck or two with me.

Don't know the rules but looks good for English Club. Not sure about using it in a lesson, but maybe you could make up your own activities involving those cards. In my experience, scrabble and its spin off can be good if you change the rules a bit to suit the purpose and students playing it.