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Wakatta
June 3rd, 2009, 21:20
Here's a quickie worksheet targeted at JHS students. It mostly deals with short and long ("weak" and "strong") vowel sounds. It also gives my best guess at the IPA transcriptions used by New Horizon for these sounds (please correct any mistakes). It was thrown together in a few minutes, but hopefully it'll still be useful. I include the IPA so that kids can actually understand their textbooks. You'll probably need to spend a minute or two explaining what IPA is.

Meant for kids who have already been introduced to basic phonics, obviously. The basic rule is the vowel-consonant-e rule. I've used it to summarize and review what I'd taught them in start-of-class warmups for a few classes. I've also used it for eikaiwa students (the teachers at an ES during an "English kenshuu").

I use the cot/caught merger, I know. I think it's justified in that it's a pretty subtle variation even for native speakers: I never even knew about it until I read about it on Wikipedia and such.

I use a squiggly line to mean "weak" and a straight line to mean "strong".

Wakatta
June 4th, 2009, 15:55
Fixed an error on the IPA for "save". It's also no longer upside-down.

turbotgenki
September 8th, 2009, 06:44
Hey, brilliant that you're teaching phonics - well impressed here though speaking SSE (standard southern English) caught and cot are very different, but I'll let you off.

If you're an IPA perfectionist, don't forget the [kj] approximant in cute, I was thinking run and rune are less confusing, but agree that cute is a vocab item they'll use and see, rune highly unlikely.

Hope to see more, I could never get them to teach phonics and sneaked it in if i took the class alone :roll: Were they happy to do this from the start of your time?

fidelity
September 26th, 2009, 01:16
If you're an IPA perfectionist, don't forget the [kj] approximant in cute, I was thinking run and rune are less confusing, but agree that cute is a vocab item they'll use and see, rune highly unlikely.
Yeah, I can see the potential for the yu sound in cute being confusing, but there aren't a lot of _u_ / _u_e pairs that don't add the y to the u sound. Only one I can think of is dud / dude.

Wakatta
October 5th, 2009, 11:05
Hey, brilliant that you're teaching phonics - well impressed here though speaking SSE (standard southern English) caught and cot are very different, but I'll let you off.

If you're an IPA perfectionist, don't forget the [kj] approximant in cute, I was thinking run and rune are less confusing, but agree that cute is a vocab item they'll use and see, rune highly unlikely.

Hope to see more, I could never get them to teach phonics and sneaked it in if i took the class alone :roll: Were they happy to do this from the start of your time?

They generally were! It varied from school to school.

The cot/caught thing is a fair point, but I'd argue that A) merging the two saves a sound and is standard for about half of Americans B) the distinction is pretty subtle, and not exactly the biggest issue for most Japanese speakers of English.

I also posted up a teaching guide sort of thing with collected tricks from Ampersand and others on how to teach the kids the sounds:
http://www.ithinkimlost.com/articles/9633-introductory-phonics-es-targeted.html

Probably the most important point that was impressed on me and that I'd like to pass on is: you do not need any kind of special linguistic training to be a good functional phonics teacher. As native speakers, we already know this stuff; we just need to spend some time thinking about it, making some understood rules explicit, and finding or creating ways to teach non-native speakers to do it. Nobody should say, "I can't teach phonics because I'm not a linguist".