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Beat
June 15th, 2009, 02:25
Has anyone been through an interview with them that can tell me a bit of what to expect? I know the basic blurb but anything more than that would be appreciated. I know you're an honest lot, so let rip. Many thanks.
(I know there's another Aeon thread but I hear some things have changed in the last year. Is this true?)

heeyal
June 15th, 2009, 06:36
I interviewed with Aeon in London back in February. There was about 60 or so there all together and two recruiters.

The day basically went like this: The two recruiters gave a presentation for a couple of hours about what Aeon was and stuff. Then they split us into groups and called us in two groups at a time for the sample lessons (my group was last so I had to wait around for 5 hours which was shit but you might be luckier).

Sample lesson - I really didn't enjoy this part. About 7-10 in a group and you take it in turn to do your lesson with the others playing the part of the students. Problem is that the 'students' are either focused on their own lesson that's coming up, or reflecting on how theirs went. Also the recruiters seemed to be a lot less friendly in this section - adding to the already weird atmosphere.

After everyone has taught then you do a 10 minute grammar test and quiz. I can't really remember much about the tests but things like spelling awkward words, correcting sentences and stuff about how you would be a good employee.

If you do well enough they invite you back for a one-on-one interview. That's all I remember really. Let me know if you have any other questions and I'll ramble some more.

Beat
June 16th, 2009, 07:43
Thanks for that. Did they offer you a job? What did you think of the company?

FiercestCalm
June 16th, 2009, 08:03
Ditto on heeyal's stuff. I went to an interview in March. I was asked back after the first day for a personal interview. It was quite long, about 30-40 minutes. We started out with another sample lesson. The recruiter gave me a page from one of AEON's curriculum books and asked that I give a 5 minute lesson based on that sheet. I did so, then he pointed out things that were wrong with the lesson I gave and asked me to do it again.

For the lesson, I've forgotten some of the points he was looking for, but things I remember are that it's important to smile a lot and be friendly and give a lot of feedback to the 'student.'

Next he asked some standard Eikawa-type interview questions - what are your strengths and weaknesses, why did you choose AEON, how will you adapt to life in Japan, etc. He also asked some questions about the information they covered the first day, so be sure to pay attention!

Lastly he just did some general housekeeping questions about placement and ability, then showed me what a typical week at AEON would be like. A few weeks later I got a letter saying I'd been rejected, so... haha, dunno how useful this information will be anyway. Good luck!

heeyal
June 16th, 2009, 18:07
Did they offer you a job? What did you think of the company?

Ha! No job offer for me, I was culled after the first round.

Re the company: they seemed OK. It's always difficult to try and suss out any company from their interview sessions when generally their only going to be presenting themselves shrowded in golden light. But I would guess (and this is only a guess from what I've seen at the interview and read online - both to be taken with a big ol' bag of salt) that they could be an alright lot to work for. A lot of people have mentioned a cult vibe that they got from AEON, I can sort of see where they're coming from, they mention 'The AEON way' quite a few times but like all things I think whether you enjoy working there or not will be highly dependent on your co-workers.

Good luck for your interview, and as FC mentioned - smile dammit! Smile like your life depends on it!

DocBosch
June 17th, 2009, 02:08
I taught for AEON for two years in Niigata-shi. The training and recruiting staff definitely try to keep everyone genki and mention the 'Aeon Way' a fair bit, but I think "cultish" is too strong a term. They have a fairly strong corporate culture, but no more than that.

The job itself was fine. I enjoyed managing my own classroom and getting to know my students. I didn't get paid as much or get as much time off as my friends in JET, but I was comfortable and happy.

The biggest downside is that because AEON is a for-profit company, they will pressure you to sell more classes/books/CDs to your students. I always hated the reminder that I was supposed to be a salesman AND a teacher, and I never tried very hard to sell anything.

As for the interview- it was more than 6 years ago now, so my recollection is foggy. As I recall, it was an all-afternoon affair that started with a presentation on AEON's structure and goals, as well as an overview on life in Japan. There was a short break, and then all the applicants did 10-minute demo lessons with the other applicants and recruiters serving as students. There was also a one-page English grammar test Another short break, and the applicants who'd done well so far did one-on-one lessons with a recruiter who pretended to be a shy Japanese student.

That was that. Some weeks later I got a phone call to say I'd been accepted, then a bunch of paperwork by mail. As I recall, there was a non-refundable processing fee of something like $100-200 dollars, and I had to buy my own plane ticket. Once I landed in Narita, AEON had a team there to pick up the new arrivals and shuttle us off for a week of training before we headed out to our branch schools.

All of my experience is from 2003-2005, so things may or may not have changed.

Beat
June 17th, 2009, 04:29
Thanks for the info guys. Where were you based Doc? What's the housing generally like?

DocBosch
June 17th, 2009, 05:03
I taught in Niigata-shi, Niigata-ken. My apartment was old, but nice- spacious and reasonably affordable, although the hot water heater was never up to snuff in the winter. AEON subsidized the rent- as I recall, AEON teachers paid 41,000 yen and everything after that AEON picked up. Rent was paid directly from my paychecks, and I didn't have to worry about key money or deposit or anything. The apartment came fully furnished with fridge, toaster over, tiny tv and VCR, kotatsu, bed, desk, rice cooker, pots and pans, etc. My predecessor didn't charge me for anything, although on my own initiative I upgraded the TV and then sold it at a huge discount to my own successor.

I visited several friends throughout Japan who also taught for AEON. They all had nice enough apartments, although I think mine was the biggest. The one I saw in Tokyo was pretty small, but typical for that city. Rent was standardized at a bit over 4 man, with anything over that covered by AEON.

Jabler
March 16th, 2010, 19:25
While surfing net i came here and find this web different one...i found useful information at here...There are certainly many different posts at here...And this one also seems to me different one!

Crab
March 16th, 2010, 22:58
While surfing net i came here and find this web different one...i found useful information at here...There are certainly many different posts at here...And this one also seems to me different one!

Wow good luck being an english teacher.

Neb
March 17th, 2010, 11:07
Whose JTE found his way here, fess up.

jandek
March 18th, 2010, 09:01
to Jabler, every thread on every messageboard on the internet is a snowflake, unique and fragile like the only son of a late-medieval european monarch.

that's what you meant, right Jabler?

word
March 19th, 2010, 09:08
Eh, he's not really any worse than the OP. I'm suspicious that a job teaching English will probably continue to "allude" him.

Shirokuma
March 25th, 2010, 19:59
Aeon is ok. Bit dodgey but they all are. Most people think they are alright. The heavy sales thing sucks.

Interviewing in Japan and outside Japan is completely different. In Japan it is much less formal and a lot more devious, the interviewer WAS one of the students and he was hafu so I did not notice at first. Pay attention. Usual crap with the trial lessons etc.

western youth
May 10th, 2011, 09:47
Hi. Long time lurker, first time poster.

I was just invited to attend the AEON session in July and am wondering what people have to say about the company. I read that AEON makes you work pretty much all the time, so much that you get maybe a handful of five minute breaks in a twelve hour day. I guess I just want to know if this true or exaggerated or maybe that just some people had terrible experiences but others had great ones.

Also, as for the sales aspect, how much is this enforced? Thanks.

privileged
May 10th, 2011, 12:56
You may feel pressured to do overtime at times but it's not going to be much and if you really object you can get out of it. I don't think any foreign teacher is doing 12 hour days. I would be surprised if many were working more than 40/week.

They are up front about asking you to come in early, take turns with garbage, generally help out and have a positive attitude. As for hours and pay, you sign a contract and they will honor it.

I was there 2.5 years, during which time we went through 4 managers, which greatly affected how pleasant or unpleasant the job was.

During the worst of it we had poorly arranged scheduled and not enough time to prepare. My 2 coworkers stayed late during this period, maybe 30 - 60 min a few nights a week. I never did.

Other stuff I found quite reasonable. If I was studying on a break and they asked me to interview a prospective student, I really didn't mind. If this bothered you, it is perfectly okay to leave on your breaks, in which case obviously no one could ask you anything.

Anyway, a lot will vary depending on your particular staff and school but even worst case scenario isn't going to be that bad.

The sales thing sucks and they were getting worse about it while I was there. I suggest taking your least favorite students and make sure the manager is around while selling to them.

western youth
May 10th, 2011, 13:06
My mistake. I read the hours "10 am to 10pm" on this sheet they sent me as an indication of schedule but that's just the window of time in which you work I guess.

western youth
May 24th, 2011, 11:55
OK so I've decided to go attend one of their info sessions in two months. I was wondering if someone could tell me about the lesson plan they presented. I don't need to know about the topics you chose because I understand that's something I need to do but...I was hoping to get some information about the format of the lesson they gave. For the 30 minute lesson they want you to submit, are they expecting you to make like a binder full of worksheets? Or could there just be a list that reads like, "Talk about ___ by making presentations for 10 minutes. Then have them do an in-class worksheet for 5 minutes"? I don't expect to be handed a full list to copy from but some idea of what people have done would be helpful.

privileged
May 25th, 2011, 00:49
If I recall you hand in a lesson plan for 30 minutes but only teach 5 minutes of it. So the plan is the plan, not full worksheets, and you only need sheets or materials for the part you will actually teach.

I think the plan is to show how the activity you teach would fit in the context of a lesson.

Adults, Main topic - past perfect
Have you ever ... ?
Yes I have, No I haven't

In the lesson plan something as simple as
Drills (5 minutes)
see - saw - seen, eat - ate - eaten, and a few more would be fine

You'd need to note other stuff this way, possible intro, go over the "Have you ever" question, giving them or brainstorming some movies or food, and probably going over answers*

For the activity they would ask each other "Have you ever seen Star Wars" or whatever and depending on ability and time, make it a longer conversation. (the part you would teach in the interview)

For AEON it should be as gay and "fun" as possible, so you could have little cards of DVDs and some food face down so the students could draw one and make a question based on that.

Try to get a hard-on while interacting with male students for guaranteed success!

*sounds ridiculous but almost certainly some students would get confused about "Yes I saw" vs "Yes I have" or "Yes, I saw it last week." Real students are used to be treated like sheep so it's best to put on the leather pants and tell them exactly what you want.

As an AEON applicant you are certainly not expected to share my experience and opinions, but anyway, that's why it is okay to put obvious things in your lesson plan, they are probably not obvious to students.

AEON just wants to see your potential to smile and be patient and keep things fun and lively no matter what. Obviously your demo students already speak fine and would be able to burn through that 2-line conversation in a minute. Your real challenge is timing that 5 minutes well and making sure you have some back-ups in mind.

Maybe go over cards and questions for recognition and clarity and to kill the first couple minutes. If students are doing it quickly and smoothly, have something to indicate it is okay to do more, as simple as writing "When..." or "Where..." on the board, though not necessarily realistic in a class with Japanese students, would be infinitely better to having your pretend students repeat the simple question and answer awkwardly for 3 minutes straight while you stand there looking uncomfortable (with a hard-on).

western youth
May 25th, 2011, 03:15
Thank you so much for the lengthy response, I really appreciate it.

hamburg113
November 3rd, 2011, 09:50
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lexa1010
November 3rd, 2011, 20:26
I didn't even get a reply from Aeon so well done to you guys who made it to the interview it sounds so intense! Waiting around 5 hours! What a joke!

5100
November 3rd, 2011, 20:31
Those posters from 5 months ago appreciate the sentiment.

lexa1010
November 3rd, 2011, 20:34
Damn you Hamburg!!

schmelison
June 7th, 2012, 23:02
I taught in Niigata-shi, Niigata-ken. My apartment was old, but nice- spacious and reasonably affordable, although the hot water heater was never up to snuff in the winter. AEON subsidized the rent- as I recall, AEON teachers paid 41,000 yen and everything after that AEON picked up. Rent was paid directly from my paychecks, and I didn't have to worry about key money or deposit or anything. The apartment came fully furnished with fridge, toaster over, tiny tv and VCR, kotatsu, bed, desk, rice cooker, pots and pans, etc. My predecessor didn't charge me for anything, although on my own initiative I upgraded the TV and then sold it at a huge discount to my own successor.

Hi everyone. I was trying to find some information in relation to the apartment situation with Aeon, and I came across this thread which seems (partially) relevant to a concern of mine.


I've applied to Aeon and I've gotten as far as the group interview stage which will be on the 23rd of June. My boyfriend is half Japanese (he has Japanese citizenship) and we were planning to go to Japan together, albeit for different career reasons (he won't be working as an English teacher, that is!). I would really like to work with Aeon, as out of the options I have so far, this one seems the best to me. However, I heard (and also read on their website) that they're pretty adamant that English teachers travel alone, and it seems that staying in the apartments they provide is somewhat compulsory, yet we would very much like to live together and these apartments are only suitable for one person (and even so, I can imagine there would be a problem with the landlord etc. if we tried to live there together). Not that I expect Aeon to help us find an apartment for two or anything, but has anyone had any similar experiences where they had to turn down the apartment offered by Aeon? Also, from other similar interviews I've done, it seems to be a pretty regular that they ask if I will be traveling alone or with someone else. Any recommendations about how I should answer this if it comes up in the interview with Aeon? Should I lie and explain it later, if I get the position with them? Are they less likely to hire me if they know beforehand that I don't plan to travel alone? Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!

pika
June 8th, 2012, 04:21
Hi everyone. I was trying to find some information in relation to the apartment situation with Aeon, and I came across this thread which seems (partially) relevant to a concern of mine.


I've applied to Aeon and I've gotten as far as the group interview stage which will be on the 23rd of June. My boyfriend is half Japanese (he has Japanese citizenship) and we were planning to go to Japan together, albeit for different career reasons (he won't be working as an English teacher, that is!). I would really like to work with Aeon, as out of the options I have so far, this one seems the best to me. However, I heard (and also read on their website) that they're pretty adamant that English teachers travel alone, and it seems that staying in the apartments they provide is somewhat compulsory, yet we would very much like to live together and these apartments are only suitable for one person (and even so, I can imagine there would be a problem with the landlord etc. if we tried to live there together). Not that I expect Aeon to help us find an apartment for two or anything, but has anyone had any similar experiences where they had to turn down the apartment offered by Aeon? Also, from other similar interviews I've done, it seems to be a pretty regular that they ask if I will be traveling alone or with someone else. Any recommendations about how I should answer this if it comes up in the interview with Aeon? Should I lie and explain it later, if I get the position with them? Are they less likely to hire me if they know beforehand that I don't plan to travel alone? Any advice would be much appreciated! Thanks!

If your boyfriend has Japanese citizenship, I don't see the point of going through the overseas application process with a dispatch company. You'd have a hard time getting placed where both of you want to live, anyway. I would go over with him, get a spousal visa, and apply to places within the country. You'll have the benefit of not needing visa sponsorship. As for apartments, just use a real estate agent. If you two move into a metropolitan area there will be plenty who are used to helping out foreigners, as well as plenty of jobs to get that pay just as well as AEON. Use gaijinpot.com and ohayosensei.com once you get there to find local jobs.

If you want to try going through a dispatch company, then tell them the truth. I don't see how you'd be able to avoid telling them the truth at some point to avoid being stuck in a one-person apartment, so if you lied they would find out eventually. Many would probably think it's a plus that you're going over with a Japanese citizen. One big worry of dispatch companies is that their employees will get homesickness and culture shock and fly back home after a month or so, and living with a Japanese citizen would ease the transition a lot and make you less likely to do something like that.

schmelison
June 8th, 2012, 07:16
If your boyfriend has Japanese citizenship, I don't see the point of going through the overseas application process with a dispatch company. You'd have a hard time getting placed where both of you want to live, anyway. I would go over with him, get a spousal visa, and apply to places within the country. You'll have the benefit of not needing visa sponsorship. As for apartments, just use a real estate agent. If you two move into a metropolitan area there will be plenty who are used to helping out foreigners, as well as plenty of jobs to get that pay just as well as AEON. Use gaijinpot.com and ohayosensei.com once you get there to find local jobs.

If you want to try going through a dispatch company, then tell them the truth. I don't see how you'd be able to avoid telling them the truth at some point to avoid being stuck in a one-person apartment, so if you lied they would find out eventually. Many would probably think it's a plus that you're going over with a Japanese citizen. One big worry of dispatch companies is that their employees will get homesickness and culture shock and fly back home after a month or so, and living with a Japanese citizen would ease the transition a lot and make you less likely to do something like that.

Thanks a million for the advice! The spousal visa makes alot more sense, of course, but I am just a bit dubious of going there without having anything solid beforehand. I was always unsure as to whether or not the dispatch companies would mind if I went with another person - I seem to receive mixed reactions from different interviewers. Some seem quite positive, probably for the reasons you've mentioned, but some also are worried that I would not be as flexible with regards to where I would be working, which in a sense is kind of true. We'll see how it goes anyway! Thanks again!

Ini
June 8th, 2012, 08:43
How can you get a spouse visa if you're not married?

pika
June 8th, 2012, 08:54
How can you get a spouse visa if you're not married?

Oh god, I'm an idiot. I forgot about that part. Lol.

schmelison
June 8th, 2012, 19:23
Oh god, I'm an idiot. I forgot about that part. Lol.

Haha don't worry, so did I. I mentioned it to my boyfriend last night and he almost peed himself laughing.

pika
June 9th, 2012, 14:31
Haha don't worry, so did I. I mentioned it to my boyfriend last night and he almost peed himself laughing.

Lol, sorry for giving you false hope. Depending on what country you're from, you can maybe go on a working holiday visa. If you're actually from Ireland, you'll qualify. Here's information: MOFA: The Working Holiday Programmes in Japan (http://www.mofa.go.jp/j_info/visit/w_holiday/programme.html#2)

It can last you a whole year, too, for Irish citizens (initially issued for 6 months, and renewable for another 6 months). Just as good as going with a dispatch company, and better than having to marry for the spousal visa.

There, now I feel like I'm actually useful. Lol.