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cvmurrieta
July 1st, 2009, 11:39
Any Americans out there thought about doing Teach for America or any other teaching fellows programs in other cities in the US? Yeah, I know that you have to start out in the most underprivileged schools, but I am thinking about applying when the various applications become available. Right now I am thinking about NYC or Nashville. The upshot of these programs is that after three years you will also have a Master's in Education.

AliDimayev
July 1st, 2009, 12:15
I thought you were staying in japan?

Also, the school district I worked for before I came on to JET would have paid for me to get my Masters in Education. SO you might just want to get some teacher certification, get a job at decenet school system that will provide you with a masters as well.

elleohelle
July 1st, 2009, 12:27
Teach for America and Teaching Fellows programs are usually REALLY competitive. The application process is just as rigorous as JET. I applied for TFA and made it to the final stage but didn't make it.

Urthona
July 1st, 2009, 14:19
Teach for America and Teaching Fellows programs are usually REALLY competitive. The application process is just as rigorous as JET. I applied for TFA and made it to the final stage but didn't make it.

Teach for America is actually more prestigious and harder to get. They are also pickier about majors. They crave math and science majors and want more concrete examples of actual skill. You actually teach rather than be a foreign panda entertaining the kiddies.

Not as much fun and you do work in hell-holes.

cvmurrieta
July 1st, 2009, 14:57
I thought you were staying in japan?

I am thinking down the road.

elleohelle
July 2nd, 2009, 06:13
TFA is very different from JET too. I'm not sure if it would help you in going back to Japan and applying abroad could be really difficult, if not impossible. I'm honestly glad I didn't get in. The program was not for me. You can be placed at pretty dangerous schools.

wicket
July 2nd, 2009, 07:12
the first school i was placed at in osaka the kids had knives, took apart desks and threw them at each other; and hit the teachers.
it's not just america.

seriously, how can you get a masters in education if you don't have an undergrad. degree or postgrad diploma in education?

Paladia
July 2nd, 2009, 07:21
seriously, how can you get a masters in education if you don't have an undergrad. degree or postgrad diploma in education?

At least in NYC, those without a relevant bachelor's have to do a little more than those with an undergrad in Education. IE, the year in student teaching and all mandatory seminars (child abuse and so on) as well as all the licensing tests.
If they made people get a second BA to become teachers, they would have an even bigger issue filling spots than they do now, especially in math and science...

elleohelle
July 2nd, 2009, 07:27
Here are some links to give you more info.
Chicago Teaching Fellows :: Help Chicago's students compete. Level the playing field. (http://www.chicagoteachingfellows.org/)
Home - Teaching Fellows (http://www.teachingfellows.org/)

Teaching Fellows programs exist to get smart and ambitious people teaching in crummy schools.

AliDimayev
July 2nd, 2009, 07:37
the first school i was placed at in osaka the kids had knives, took apart desks and threw them at each other; and hit the teachers.
it's not just america.

seriously, how can you get a masters in education if you don't have an undergrad. degree or postgrad diploma in education?

education is not the only Masters you can get wihtout having a BA in the same field.

ampersand
July 2nd, 2009, 08:59
seriously, how can you get a masters in education if you don't have an undergrad. degree or postgrad diploma in education?The same way you get any advanced degree in a different subject than your undergrad degree: you do the work for the advanced degree and probably some additional remedial material.

cvmurrieta
July 2nd, 2009, 12:45
At least in NYC, those without a relevant bachelor's have to do a little more than those with an undergrad in Education. IE, the year in student teaching and all mandatory seminars (child abuse and so on) as well as all the licensing tests.
If they made people get a second BA to become teachers, they would have an even bigger issue filling spots than they do now, especially in math and science...

I liked the NYC program because it seemed to let in a few more "fellows" than the other programs I have been looking at. In addition, I have never been to th Big Apple and would like to experience it. Yes, I know that Manhattan will be mega-experience, but I have read that places like Brooklyn and Queens are more affordable.

As for the danger, it is my time when it is my time. I am expecting the public school system to be more like the movie "New Jack City" (yes, I am dating myself, but I don't give a hoot) than Beverly Hills 90210. I've read that a lot of people that do go through the NYC program end up teaching in middle and upper-middle class schools in New York State.

Yes, eelleohelle, I have checked out Chitown's programs as well. I'd actually prefer to go back to school and get a teaching credential, but then you have to do a semester or so unpaid (in the mean time paying for life's necessities).

AliDimayev
July 2nd, 2009, 14:37
The same way you get any advanced degree in a different subject than your undergrad degree: you do the work for the advanced degree and probably some additional remedial material.
It isnot uncommon at all. In fact most of Chem. Eng.l proffers had bachelers degrees in fields other isnot uncommon at all. In fact most of Chem. Eng.l proffers had bachelers degrees in fields other than chemistry or chemical engineering.

Paladia
July 4th, 2009, 20:57
In addition, I have never been to th Big Apple and would like to experience it. Yes, I know that Manhattan will be mega-experience, but I have read that places like Brooklyn and Queens are more affordable.

I am a New Yorker. I was born and raised there. I have "the Accent", you know that.
Manhattan is where the tourists go, where the museums are, where the "action" is. Truth told, very few New Yorkers live there anymore because we simply cannot afford it. Most of Manhattan is now rich out-of-town yuppies.
Brooklyn and Queens (I'm a Queens girl myself) as well as the Bronx are getting more expensive by the day, but our public transportation systems are excellent and it is the neighborhoods of these boroughs where the REAL New York City happens. The best Chinese food is not found in Chinatown but in Flushing, Queens. Each of us has a favorite pizzeria, and few would claim a joint in Manhattan was the best. I love Manhattan as much as anyone else, but as a New Yorker the best real experience comes from Bensonhurst, Williamsburg, Riverdale, Astoria, Jackson Heights, Jamaica, Howard Beach...
If you are considering New York, great. Don't discount the Boroughs. They'll treat you a lot better than Manhattan ever will.

PS: Staten Island doesn't count. Bergen County in Jersey is more a part of the City than Staten Island so don't fool yourself.

cvmurrieta
July 6th, 2009, 09:42
I am a New Yorker. I was born and raised there. I have "the Accent", you know that.
Manhattan is where the tourists go, where the museums are, where the "action" is. Truth told, very few New Yorkers live there anymore because we simply cannot afford it. Most of Manhattan is now rich out-of-town yuppies.
Brooklyn and Queens (I'm a Queens girl myself) as well as the Bronx are getting more expensive by the day, but our public transportation systems are excellent and it is the neighborhoods of these boroughs where the REAL New York City happens. The best Chinese food is not found in Chinatown but in Flushing, Queens. Each of us has a favorite pizzeria, and few would claim a joint in Manhattan was the best. I love Manhattan as much as anyone else, but as a New Yorker the best real experience comes from Bensonhurst, Williamsburg, Riverdale, Astoria, Jackson Heights, Jamaica, Howard Beach...
If you are considering New York, great. Don't discount the Boroughs. They'll treat you a lot better than Manhattan ever will.

PS: Staten Island doesn't count. Bergen County in Jersey is more a part of the City than Staten Island so don't fool yourself.

Yes, Paladia, I know that you are a New Yorker. That is why I was looking forward to what you had to say. I meant to say that I knew Manhattan would be "mega-EXPENSIVE". I've never been to Manhattan, but I have lived in super pricey So Cal.

Aren't the Mets in Queens at the new stadium? (I can't get away from my sports interest).

Thanks for the rundown on the Boroughs!

Paladia
July 6th, 2009, 09:57
I meant to say that I knew Manhattan would be "mega-EXPENSIVE". I've never been to Manhattan, but I have lived in super pricey So Cal.

The key isn't so much that it's expensive (Brookyln's beginning to rival Manhattan to be honest) but a lot of us find the 'NY Flavor' gone from Manhattan because noone sane can afford it anymore.


Aren't the Mets in Queens at the new stadium? (I can't get away from my sports interest).0

Yeah, Citi Field is pretty far deep in Queens. And THE YANKEES SUCK.

Hikari
July 7th, 2009, 05:20
the first school i was placed at in osaka the kids had knives, took apart desks and threw them at each other; and hit the teachers.
it's not just america.

seriously, how can you get a masters in education if you don't have an undergrad. degree or postgrad diploma in education?

Is the Australian college/university system more similar to the American or British system?