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patjs
October 29th, 2009, 14:00
Tomrrow I have to do two lessons. 5th grade combined into one group, and then after 6th grade in one large group. Each level has about 60 kids so it seems pointless to me to try anything very difficult and the school wants me to just "play" anyway. I'm kind of short on ideas because they are older and I know the kids are not going to be into the simple kiddie games you can do with 2nd or 3rd years.

Anyone have experience with large groups? Anything that worked out well?

Ini
October 29th, 2009, 15:05
set up a drum circle and just jam

patjs
October 29th, 2009, 16:58
Any real advice?? Anyone?

FiercestCalm
October 29th, 2009, 17:15
Are you in a classroom or a gym?

In a classroom I'd recommend some kind of drawing or writing activity. Most of them love to draw at any age and it will keep them quiet. Maybe something like a monster game - you say an amount of objects, like 5 legs, 7 eyes, etc and they draw them on a monster. By the end they should all have completely different looking things.

If you're not in a classroom or don't want to do that, I'd say a bingo game. One of my most successful was when studying "can you." So they have a bingo sheet with an activity in each square (for example, swim, play soccer, whistle). Students go around and ask others, "Can you ___?" If the person answers yes, they write that name in the square. If they get all the squares filled in, they win.

wicket
October 30th, 2009, 05:00
clam's monster idea is a good one. if you have the space you could split them into teams, give the first kid in each kid the pen and one instruction '3 eyes'; when he/she finishes, hand the pen to the next kid for the next instruction. i did it on a blackboard and let them use coloured chalk.

pass the parcel is good - with 60 kids i'd split it into 4 groups. i did this and made them ask 'is it a...?' before passing it on and if they guessed correctly they got to keep it [everything was items found in a schoolbag], but those were older kids.

what's the time, mr wolf? is good if you have the space. in case you don't know it, basically the kids all line up and chorus "what's the time, mr wolf?" you're the wolf, at the other end of the room/area. you say "3 o'clock" [or whatever time] and they have to take 3 big strides. their aim is to get to the other side of the room without you catching them, because you have the option of saying "it's DINNER TIME" and chasing them - kids love being chased!

hot potato is good - again i'd split them into 4 groups. give each group a ball and yell out a category "fruit" "animals" - whatever vocab. they know the aim is to throw the ball around and whoever catches it has to yell out something in the category. i used to assign a scribe in each group, too, and give a point for each item.

whisper down the alley [used to be called "chinese whispers" in less politically-correct times] might also work.

spelling and maths - again in teams [4-6 kids] each team has a whiteboard or sheet of paper and pens. you yell out an english word or math problem in english and they have to write the answer down and have the whole team stand. you then choose someone from the fastest team to read their answer.

lastly, along the lines of a writing activity, making counting books for younger pupils, [e.g. a picture of one elephant with "1 elephant" written on the page] or even alphabet books ["a is for apple"] could be good. you could assign each student a letter or number and see what they can come up with. with 60 kids you'd obviously get quite a few books - faster/more capable kids could do more than one page. then they could be used with the first year classes. i did this with hiragana/katakana books in australia [year 8 students made them for year 7 students to use] and they loved it.

Fruity
October 30th, 2009, 06:09
hot potato is good - again i'd split them into 4 groups. give each group a ball and yell out a category "fruit" "animals" - whatever vocab. they know the aim is to throw the ball around and whoever catches it has to yell out something in the category. i used to assign a scribe in each group, too, and give a point for each item.

whisper down the alley [used to be called "chinese whispers" in less politically-correct times] might also work.

Wow I didn't know chinese whipsers is called whisper down the alley now (although I can see it being considered slightly un-pc!)

I don't know if you have access to a parachute... but a variation of hot potato would be a parachute game. You can choose what category you want to concentrate on, i.e. fruit or numbers. Number the children 1 through to 5 around the circle and shout out maths sums such as 1+3=... and all number 4 people run around under the parachute and switch places etc. The kids love it here.