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delandbeforetime
April 26th, 2010, 20:33
Sorry guys, I'm getting freaked out by the company's threats to like, end your existence if you spill secrets. Edited to preserve my life.

Ini
April 26th, 2010, 20:54
how big a bonus did they give you to write that?

3ngrishsensei
April 26th, 2010, 20:57
it's weird. I've got a pretty cushy JET job, but somehow after reading this, I envy you a little.

It's the part about being able to teach/plan everything yourself.

and the part about being in the city.

delandbeforetime
April 26th, 2010, 21:00
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delandbeforetime
April 26th, 2010, 21:03
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3ngrishsensei
April 26th, 2010, 21:27
yeah, but when you are at work, it's for a purpose. Your actually needed.

And I think the nervous breakdown happens to many new teachers - regardless of where they are - when they are thrown into the job full force. My first year of teaching (real teaching, that is, in my home country) felt like a battleground every day.

If you get a good system down, set a rhythm to your madness, you'll be able to reduce your workload a lot, and get into patterns. Especially since you have a lot of the control, it seems.

Don't get me wrong. I'm working myself into more and more purposeful things in my job ( I teach/plan a number of classes solo now) , it's not bad, by any means. I just know what it was like to have more of the responsibility myself, and I kinda miss it.

The no time for J-go is a downside, but on the other side, at least all the work you're doing at your job is the stuff they're paying you for (it can be appreciated) , and you don't have to feel like a useless schmuck.

keep at it. Good luck!

delandbeforetime
April 26th, 2010, 22:39
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Neb
April 28th, 2010, 08:31
I'm not envious at all. JET has a huge variety of placements, some of which fall under what you have (mostly solo planning of lessons, as well as conduction of class, lots of interaction with kids etc), along with the benefits of being on JET. Having said that, Amity was one of the better options I found when searching for alternatives before JET replies came through.

delandbeforetime
April 28th, 2010, 08:51
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delandbeforetime
June 9th, 2010, 19:26
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n107
June 9th, 2010, 22:57
Care to elaborate?

delandbeforetime
June 9th, 2010, 23:16
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n107
June 10th, 2010, 07:28
Summed up: my classes are about to go from 30 to 40 for a couple months straight, the textbooks they expect us to use are atrocious, they abuse my Japanese coworkers to the point that it should almost be called slave labor, and I have contracted a rather serious and contagious illness for which I am not getting paid time off/will have to make up classes for later on.

Damn. How soon can you be out of there and into a new job for your own sake?

delandbeforetime
June 10th, 2010, 08:55
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n107
June 10th, 2010, 14:22
If the company is that bad (and you even feel threatened if you speak poorly about them) then I definitely think it's time you changed jobs. Don't even worry about what you get, just take the first job that will have you so you at least get free of that slave-labor joint. Then you can take your time to put some effort into finding what you'd really like.

Still, I wouldn't worry about talking crap on a place that cruel. What are they going to do, fire you? That would be a blessing, wouldn't it? From the sounds of it, the worst thing they could do would be NOT fire you.

3ngrishsensei
June 10th, 2010, 15:03
Still, I wouldn't worry about talking crap on a place that cruel. What are they going to do, fire you?

Yeah, but if she gets fired she loses her employment visa sponsorship. In order to be able to keep working in Japan, she would have to find a new company to sponsor her (and being fired will look bad). Not being able to work in Japan = no money. Not having a proper visa in Japan = deportation if she's caught, right? So, I'm sure it's harder than it looks. I wish the best for her as well.

n107
June 10th, 2010, 15:27
Yeah, but if she gets fired she loses her employment visa sponsorship. In order to be able to keep working in Japan, she would have to find a new company to sponsor her (and being fired will look bad). Not being able to work in Japan = no money. Not having a proper visa in Japan = deportation if she's caught, right? So, I'm sure it's harder than it looks. I wish the best for her as well.

Still seems more favorable than to be a slave in an abusive, threatening company. And how would they know who is posting what online unless she's making the horrible mistake of using work computers to write all this stuff?

Of course the best course of events are easier to decide when the situation is about someone else but however you do it the key idea is to jump ship as soon as possible.

3ngrishsensei
June 10th, 2010, 15:48
Still seems more favorable than to be a slave in an abusive, threatening company.

Yeah, but if it were me, I wouldn't want to be fired. I would want to keep my situation secure, and then hopefully find a better job soon. But that all depends on how much she has invested in her current situation. Some things make it harder, that's all. Especially since we are limited to jobs by visa status and language ability.

kemek
June 10th, 2010, 23:54
How does the work visa work with losing a job? If you quit, you don't lose the visa but if you're fired you do? Just curious. I know some people who have taken a job for the visa and then quit so they could get a better job that doesn't sponsor visas.

3ngrishsensei
June 13th, 2010, 00:17
How does the work visa work with losing a job? If you quit, you don't lose the visa but if you're fired you do? Just curious. I know some people who have taken a job for the visa and then quit so they could get a better job that doesn't sponsor visas.

I'm pretty sure your visa won't be void until it's actual expiration date.

However, would it be possible to legally work under another job if your current visa was sponsored by a previous job? If you were to look for other employment, the paperwork involved in being hired would probably require the new employer to sponsor you. Unless this new employer was okay with sidestepping the law....
??

mteacher80
June 13th, 2010, 11:12
yeah most jobs that "dont sponser visas" just means they dont hook you up with a visa to get to japan and then start work. but if you already ahve a visa they will almost always just switch over and "sponsor" you.

whistleblower
August 13th, 2010, 09:08
These assholes got enough loyalty out of me while completely screwing me over in the process, so I don't give a shit about their threats. I doubt they'd ever find out who I am anyway.

I worked for Amity for a period of time, fulfilled a contract and I could go on all day about how this company operates.

We all know that it's a business first and foremost, sure, more interested in just selling shit to parents and keeping kids entertained. Most kids don't give a shit about English, they're just being forced so their parents can brag about how smart they are. So, they don't really pay attention most of the time, sometimes you have a good class, but lots of times I was overwhelmed. Don't expect too much from the staff to help you, and if you try to be strict with the kids they'll tell their parents, who will then start yelling at you. If any parents express any interest in leaving, Amity comes down on you hard, they don't care about their teacher's well-being. There is very little useful teaching going on, it's just a daycare for rich parents.

I was constantly overworked and had to stay after my hours were finished without receiving pay. We had to clean the school every night and weren't paid for it, it took at least an hour. The Japanese staff helped out too, but it still sucked. If you didn't want to do it, your objections would be met with plenty of hostility and other shit.

Despite having set lessons for the most part, things could sometimes change up, giving teachers very little time to prepare. If you flubbed something up, Amity would just start yelling at you. I'm sure this isn't unique to the company, but that doesn't make it better.

Plenty of teachers are over-stressed, both Japanese and foreign staff, with little in the way of a support network.

There's plenty more that I could write about, but overall I'd highly advise against working at Amity if you have other options.

cvmurrieta
August 17th, 2010, 08:10
Hey, whistleblower, thanks for the info. Before I started working where I am now, I had applied to Amity. A rep from there got all pissy and said haughtily, "We bring teachers from overseas on OUR OWN VISA." I felt bad about not being given a good look. Now I see it as a blessing in disguise.

I had been led to believe that Amity had some kind of agreement with Immi to be able to use this special visa. Now I think Amity probably uses the generic Specialist in Humanities visa and calls the visa its "OWN VISA" to emphasize the company is sponsoring you and to possibly intimidate newbies who aren't familiar with Japanese Labor Law.