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adrianjet
August 7th, 2010, 14:57
Did anyone here ever apply for work in a cram school before? Since Japan has a million and one cram schools and a lot of them I saw have English courses how feasible is it for a foreigner to get a job at one teaching English? (Do cram schools also subcontract out to eikawa same as the BOE? Or do they recruit directly since they are private companies?)

I looked at some of the major chains like Yoyogi and Kawaijuku and visited their websites but everything in the jobs section was in Japanese like this:
lޕW / ͍mi@ցE\ZEw󌱁j (http://www.kawai-juku.ac.jp/kawaijuku/recruit/recruit.html)

However I noticed the English teachers they have are mostly Japanese and some of the videos I played of the classes have Japanese instruction on various English phrases, grammar, etc but not much spoken English. Would a gaijin have an advantage then being able to demonstrate fluent spoken and written English over the Japanese teachers? If anyone tried working or applying there before can you post your experience? Is it better than companies like Interac? I assume if a major cram school hires you directly then you get better treatment and a more permanent position. True or false?

UPGRAYEDD
August 7th, 2010, 15:03
You have absolutely no chance of getting a job at a cram school unless you speak 100% fluent Japanese.

The entire point of juku is to learn English grammar to pass entrance exams. If you can't explain English grammar in Japanese nor give test taking tips in Japanese then you can't do the job.

adrianjet
August 7th, 2010, 15:33
You have absolutely no chance of getting a job at a cram school unless you speak 100% fluent Japanese.

The entire point of juku is to learn English grammar to pass entrance exams. If you can't explain English grammar in Japanese nor give test taking tips in Japanese then you can't do the job.

Wow thats kind of sad. Cramming the students with grammar that they'll probably forget after the test. It sounds like a waste they only use it for the exam and thats it. You sure theres no classes or tutoring in cram school on spoken English?

Still I am curious. Do cram schools give better benefits/pay in comparison to Interac, Aeon, etc? Do big companies like Yoyogi pay your health insurance, offer housing, more vacation days, flexible schedule, etc? And most importantly is a cram school instructor considered a full-time or part time position?

UPGRAYEDD
August 7th, 2010, 16:06
They have English conversation schools for teaching spoken English.

And jukus don't give better benefits. Probably no benefits at all. They are pretty much all staffed by university and grad school students on a part time basis.

adrianjet
August 7th, 2010, 16:34
And jukus don't give better benefits. Probably no benefits at all. They are pretty much all staffed by university and grad school students on a part time basis.

That sucks. I heard how Japanese parents drop their life savings into cram schools, I thought part of that small fortune would go to teachers' salaries. I wonder if they know they are paying so much to have their kids taught by students instead of teachers.

Pyrography
August 7th, 2010, 17:26
They do; Juku aren't schools, they are after-school crams designed to give students a boost through exams. The Japanese school system is all about the exams over all else, and the jukus are a byproduct of that.

Things like Eikaiwa are for less-common situations like businessmen who are going to be using English, or people that actually have an interest in learning the language.

UPGRAYEDD
August 7th, 2010, 21:19
It's really rare to actually find a full time juku teacher. The kinds of people who teach there are university students and people who are trying to become teachers but haven't passed the teaching exams yet.

adrianjet
August 7th, 2010, 22:00
It's really rare to actually find a full time juku teacher. The kinds of people who teach there are university students and people who are trying to become teachers but haven't passed the teaching exams yet.

Well for example I checked that big corporation cram school Yoyogi and their teacher site below has a bunch of people who look far older than any university student I've seen. They look more like middle aged professional teachers but I'm not sure if they're doing full time or part time at the school. Can you take a quick look and tell me if they are only part timers or full time juku? The instructor website is below:

���X�؃[�~�i�[���i�\���Z�j�@�u�t�Љ� (http://www.yozemi.ac.jp/les/koshi/kyushu_eng.html)

I also looked into the jobs section and I found some interesting stuff below for one of the positions:
初任給(平成21年度実績)
大卒 206,500円(住宅・皆勤手当含む)
扶養家族手当・通勤交通費手当・時間外手当・休日勤務手当

They do pay on the low end but it says they offer extra money for housing rent, is that correct? Or is it a free apartment they are offering? I heard how cram schools are a multi-billion dollar business so I assume those big companies would need full time staff to keep up with demand from their students. I even read of juku for juku, or cram schools to teach students to prepare for cram schools! Now that is hardcore! Either way its such a big business it makes eikaiwa look like a drop in the bucket. I would definitely like to get into any opportunities there once I advance my Japanese skills.

patjs
August 8th, 2010, 01:27
Why are you so obsessed with juku? They don't want or need foreign employees there.

If you want to get a job teaching English in Japan you can get paid more money in an eikaiwa or as an ALT. I'm telling you now, there is no way you are going to get a job in juku unless you are fluent in Japanese.

Jordan
August 8th, 2010, 06:44
Wow thats kind of sad. Cramming the students with grammar that they'll probably forget after the test. It sounds like a waste they only use it for the exam and thats it. You sure theres no classes or tutoring in cram school on spoken English?

Clues in the (admittedly translated) name. Cram schools are for cramming. When you cram for an exam do you take your time to think indepth about the material or do memorise as much as you can in a short space of time to get through the exam?

Why would they waste time learning ANYTHING that isn't on the exam?

adrianjet
August 8th, 2010, 09:39
Why are you so obsessed with juku? They don't want or need foreign employees there.

If you want to get a job teaching English in Japan you can get paid more money in an eikaiwa or as an ALT. I'm telling you now, there is no way you are going to get a job in juku unless you are fluent in Japanese.

Sorry I've just been hearing so much crap about eikaiwa and how unfair they are, I wondered if there was any alternative. But thanks for telling me juku is even worse a career choice. I didn't know how it compared in salaries, benefits, etc.


Clues in the (admittedly translated) name. Cram schools are for cramming. When you cram for an exam do you take your time to think indepth about the material or do memorise as much as you can in a short space of time to get through the exam?

Why would they waste time learning ANYTHING that isn't on the exam?

The concept of juku is still a little strange to my foreign mind. I can't understand why the Japanese want to blow so much cash and make such a big deal on little more than a fancy after school tutoring service. In America that kind of thing is volunteer work for college students or they would charge something like $10-20 an hour which is still a lot cheaper than the "tuition" the rip-off juku cost. Haven't the Japanese heard of a library? When I wanted to study for exams like the SAT I would buy a test study book and go someplace after school with my classmates where we would study together and help each other with problems. And it costed absolutely nothing. Or the student can also study by him/herself at home and ask his family for help. Or his teacher. There is a whole world of options out there to study for exams and get help without taking a second mortgage. I just wonder why they don't save that unnecessary waste of money for more important things like college tuition or paying the mortgage, etc.

UPGRAYEDD
August 8th, 2010, 14:14
Passing entrance exams determines your entire life here. It's just how it is. So parents naturally want their kids to do their best and get into top schools so they can enter top companies when they graduate.

And they pay money for cram schools because they do a better job than self study or volunteer tutors. Every time.

Native English speakers cannot fit into the juku system unless they can speak Japanese fluently.

adrianjet
August 8th, 2010, 15:16
Passing entrance exams determines your entire life here. It's just how it is. So parents naturally want their kids to do their best and get into top schools so they can enter top companies when they graduate.

Yeah I noticed how everyone is crazy about Todai or Waseda, etc thinking they will go to instant success with just the name on their resume. But its a little mystery to me why Japanese don't realize there's a whole world out there. I mean a lot of Chinese kids study hard not to get into their own schools but to go to American schools. And the Chinese system is the same as Japan's with entrance exams determining who goes to top schools like Tsinghua University.

Don't Japanese people see Harvard, MIT, or any other top rank US school as just as good as Tokyo U or even better? So just in case they don't get into a good school in Japan why not go overseas to America and get a top quality education there instead? Even Harvard doesn't base everything on tests. They look more for extracurricular activities and personal leadership skills. I would think Japanese who graduate from a top or even average American university would have much better career prospects upon returning to Japan than if they had graduated from a Japanese equivalent. They shouldn't forget this is a globalized world we live in now.

UPGRAYEDD
August 8th, 2010, 22:54
The Japanese government sends kids over to Harvard all the time. You have to pass entrance exams to get the study abroad scholarships though.

Wakatta
August 8th, 2010, 23:24
re: Adrianjet

1) Not to be facetious, but rather for the sake of concision: why didn't you go to a foreign university? (And no, I don't think you can get out of this by claiming that American universities are just the best.)
2) If they had nonetheless determined that it was okay to gamble with their tertiary education, had developed enough language ability to truly be okay in an English-speaking college level classroom (the conversations in which a lot of regular Americans would have trouble following), had found the financial resources for it, and had otherwise surpassed all the obstacles in the way of pursuing an education in the US ... I would hope they could do a little better than Harvard.

Tarquin
August 9th, 2010, 09:10
Sorry I've just been hearing so much crap about eikaiwa and how unfair they are, I wondered if there was any alternative. But thanks for telling me juku is even worse a career choice.
There is no career in eikaiwa or juku or even ALT-ing. The only English language "career" in Japan is teaching at a University (EDIT: Or running your own school).



Yeah I noticed how everyone is crazy about Todai or Waseda, etc thinking they will go to instant success with just the name on their resume.
Generally, they are treated with much higher regard. Like the guy who started Livedoor. He didn't even graduate Todai, but the fact that he got in has had him coast through life (until he commited fraud or something a while back...)


Don't Japanese people see Harvard, MIT, or any other top rank US school as just as good as Tokyo U or even better? So just in case they don't get into a good school in Japan why not go overseas to America and get a top quality education there instead?

You're overestimating the average High School kids ability to speak English. This is a massive generelisation however, outside of an exam context most of them couldn't even manage a simple conversation. This is a massive flaw in the Japanese educational system that has been going on for years. You get an average high school student to apply to any American university and you'll run into problems,

In answer to your other questions, the odds of you getting a job at a cram school are practically 0, sorry. look into finding the least dodgy Eikaiwa school, or wait and apply for JET or Interac (who are the best of a very bad bunch IMO)

HeartNana
August 9th, 2010, 11:49
Pepy kids is a juku that encourages the teacher to speak only English, I believe.

Tarquin
August 9th, 2010, 14:12
Pepy kids is a juku that encourages the teacher to speak only English, I believe.

eh, it's more eikaiwa than a juku, i know a guy who works for them and you do kids from around 3 up to 15. The older kids might be juku style but odds are you're gonna be dancing around like a twat for an average wage.

mteacher80
August 9th, 2010, 15:59
There is no career in eikaiwa or juku or even ALT-ing. The only English language "career" in Japan is teaching at a University.


What about running your own classes and or owning your own school?

I know a few guys that have been here over 10 years owning just one school, have a house two cars, families and live quite well. I think they would call it their career.

Also, to just go against what most people are saying...i know a few guys that work at jukus as english teachers and do their teaching in both english and japanese. some schools have english interviews to get into, and I think thats what these guys are there for, the interviews as well as JHS and HS speech contest prep and help.

jandek
August 11th, 2010, 08:53
What about running your own classes and or owning your own school?


This. There's a guy in my town who has been here nigh 10 years running his own school. Started off as an ALT w/JET and then after the 3 years + 2 or 3 more on private contract, started his own place. You get the Business/Investor's Visa, which apparently in some cases you have to renew every year which is kind of a bitch but lolzwhatevazamirite, and then you are set, son.

Also. As the chain eikaiwa world continues to crumble, individually-owned and operated eikaiwa are doing just fine, if not better, than before.

patjs
August 12th, 2010, 11:03
Of course you should be sure you actually want to make a career out of teaching English, not simply want to have a career that involves living in Japan.

You can get by a few years as an ALT but if you don't actually like teaching English you are going to burn out. After two years I've realized that I like teaching but I'd rather be teaching social studies or something more interesting at home.

Tarquin
August 13th, 2010, 11:35
What about running your own classes and or owning your own school?


Sorry I meant working for a specific eikaiwa company like ECC etc. Running your own school is an entirely different matter.