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Variable Rush
August 31st, 2010, 05:11
Any of you ever heard of Disney English?

Disney English – Passion for English (http://www.disneyenglish.com/EN/homepage.html)

It's a set of English as a Second Language schools in China funded by Disney. I'm sure it's a ploy to get a pile of Chinese kids interested in Mickey and Company.

Have any of your taught for them? Heard any stories? Anything?

word
August 31st, 2010, 10:57
Most of the positions they're advertising seem to be strongly related to "selling" this language course; I'd imagine it's just a cash grab in an emerging educational market. There's nothing specific mentioned regarding salary. I dunno, though, it could be a decent deal.

Gezora
August 31st, 2010, 11:20
Why doesn't Japan use this instead of Eigo Note? I think kids would be a lot more likely to learn English if they knew Stitch wanted them to. Actually you could probably convince a sizeable portion of Japan's populace to do anything if Disney was involved.
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Azrael
August 31st, 2010, 11:28
there is a disney english book in japan, one of my old schools had it - its 100% in english so they never made it out the store cupboard. came with cds and dvds and all sorts of crap.

Azrael
August 31st, 2010, 23:44
You would have to be a raving lunatic to even consider going to china unless it was on a corporate ex-pat package

Jordan
September 2nd, 2010, 01:46
they said I'd have to shave my beard and so I wrote them off entirely.
Does the safety and well-being of your beard factor in all your career decisions?

Variable Rush
September 2nd, 2010, 04:01
According to the below linked page, the pay is 10500RMB per month with a 4350RMB allowance for housing.

disney-english-is-looking-for-experience | 475 | teaching-jobs-in-china | all-teaching-jobs (http://www.footprintsrecruiting.com/all-teaching-jobs/teaching-jobs-in-china/475/disney-english-is-looking-for-experience)

10500RMB = $1,541.85
4350RMB = $638.75

I don't know if that's good or bad for Shanghai or Beijing.

Neb
September 2nd, 2010, 08:42
That is very good, that is about triple the average salary in those cities.

Shanghai: 5296 RMB
Beijing : 4868 RMB

Think it over, TRIPLE, think how comfortably you can live. Granted I'm not sure how this all works, how it gets taxed, insurance, and all that.

word
September 2nd, 2010, 09:00
Hmmm...

Jojo
September 2nd, 2010, 09:08
sounds great if you can put up with mickey mouse all day. Would suck when you want to go overseas and stop spending monopoly money

word
September 2nd, 2010, 09:34
Yeah, one of the reasons I discounted China in the first place was because no matter how well you can live on an English teacher's salary there, your money is all but worthless outside of the country. I wouldn't have been able to pay for anything anywhere else (except maybe Cambodia).

Jordan
September 2nd, 2010, 22:27
Think it over, TRIPLE, think how comfortably you can live. Granted I'm not sure how this all works, how it gets taxed, insurance, and all that.
It's high cause there's a $50 fine every time you slip up and mention democracy.
They have to factor in a few slip ups so you don't starve.

JeffersonianHighlights
December 18th, 2010, 22:24
I've noticed a lot of concerned people on other forums commenting on the dominating cultural influence of Disney. Here's my response: I currently work for Disney English in Shanghai. The fact of the matter is, there's a market for the Disney brand here and we can't quite expect a company like the Walt Disney Corporation to fail to exploit a willing market niche if it will expand their waistlines, cultural homogenization be damned.

The most pernicious thing about the Disney Corporation in China, from my perspective, is the awful manner in which corporate protocol, efficiency, and the profit margins lay waste to any semblance of decency regarding the workers here. Tens of "cast members", including myself, gave up jobs, kissed families goodbye, and uprooted our lives to work for Disney based on blatant lies that recruiters spat regarding vacation allowances (5 paid vacation days per year and you work on Thanksgiving, throughout the Christmas holiday, and New Years; that was a revelation), compensation, working hours, you name it.

Most of our benefits and compensation (especially time off, overtime, etc.) are below industry standard, from what I gather in the teaching communities here in Asia. Also, Disney will not list benefits for employees in the contract. They don't want to put it in writing; what they will put it writing is "all benefits are subject to the discretion of your direct line manager."

Furthermore, Disney English, at least in the Shanghai region, has an uncanny knack of hiring teachers for managerial positions; teachers with no managerial skills, very little people skills, and poor communication practices. Please, if you are at all interested in acquiring a job here or anywhere, get a thorough feel for the type of management system you'll be forced into. My colleagues and I did not get a choice, and this greatly reduced the amount of clear information we could obtain about our working environments before we signed on.

Rest assured, however, that the Disney environment is thoroughly Corporate. Expect your good work to be rewarded with more work and very little thanks. Expect your less-than-stellar work to be met with persistent, distrusting micromanagement, written warnings, and passive aggressiveness. Expect to continually feel vaguely put upon by upper management, to be thoroughly alienated from any job title that carries more weight than yours, and to have your pushes for innovation funneled through an endless bout of (thoroughly inefficient and demoralizing) chains of command, form letters, open-ended presentations, and eventually non-implementation.

The company is desperate to fill its pockets with money and expand as rapidly as possible-- so much so that they are currently running into trouble because people are quitting before they fulfill their contracts.

The Walt Disney Company is renowned for its customer service, and this makes sense when you see the profit incentive in it. What Disney English needs to learn is that honest and responsive human resources are equally good markers to strive for. This isn't a theme park in Anaheim or Orlando with fifty schmucks willing to sign up any day in the week. This is a job in China that requires certified teachers willing to leave kin and kind behind for something completely unknown. Frankly, we deserve better.

Azrael
December 20th, 2010, 08:21
reiteration

You would have to be a raving lunatic to even consider going to china unless it was on a corporate ex-pat package

MixedNuts
December 20th, 2010, 14:17
Expect your good work to be rewarded with more work and very little thanks. Expect your less-than-stellar work to be met with persistent, distrusting micromanagement, written warnings, and passive aggressiveness. Expect to continually feel vaguely put upon by upper management, to be thoroughly alienated from any job title that carries more weight than yours, and to have your pushes for innovation funneled through an endless bout of (thoroughly inefficient and demoralizing) chains of command, form letters, open-ended presentations, and eventually non-implementation.


Sounds familiar.

ashleytwo
December 21st, 2010, 03:24
Sounds like every job.

Miss_igirisu
December 27th, 2010, 07:58
Just in case anyone wants anymore info on this
Job Discussion Forums :: View topic - Warning - Disney English !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (http://forums.eslcafe.com/job/viewtopic.php?t=85839)

MixedNuts
December 27th, 2010, 11:37
I met someone yesterday who was leaving Japan for a job in China that supposedly pays better. But it wasn't an ALT or eikaiwa type job (more like translation for a business), so hopefully it will be.

BobsYourUncle
March 1st, 2011, 22:29
Disney is no more or less shady than all the other language schools in China. Everything in their contract is up for interpretation BY DISNEY. You are pretty much disposable as an employee. They will nickel and dime you wherever possible. These things are pretty standard. My advice is to make sure you read your contract VERY CAREFULLY and not be bashful about asking questions and raising concerns. There is so much work in China for teachers. You can always do better.

Overall, I would recommend other language schools if you can get a job that pays well with a reputable one. The benefits at Disney are pretty so-so. I've heard they make you come to work when you are sick and don't give you the normal school holidays off. You will want that time to travel and see the country.

Another thing to think about, do you really want to go to China and work for an American company teaching using American stories/American culture? Why not just stay in America?