PDA

View Full Version : Why is this sentence wrong?



word
September 22nd, 2010, 15:31
The following sentence appeared on a worksheet:

"None of the boys could do it, but Kahu could do."

It should be "...but Kahu could" or "...but Kahu could do it" or something.

I was trying to explain this to my JTE, but I couldn't explain exactly why "could do" is not appropriate. Please help me. Be specific and give examples, because she's anal and will want to know exactly why it's wrong.

FamilyMart
September 22nd, 2010, 15:44
The following sentence appeared on a worksheet:

"None of the boys could do it, but Kahu could do."

It should be "...but Kahu could" or "...but Kahu could do it" or something.

I was trying to explain this to my JTE, but I couldn't explain exactly why "could do" is not appropriate. Please help me. Be specific and give examples, because she's anal and will want to know exactly why it's wrong.


i'll take a stab at it but...

i think you use a comma with a conjunction to stick a coupla independent clauses together? Kahu could do isn't an independent clause? me thinks?

word
September 22nd, 2010, 16:04
That sounds good... Although I don't really know that "Kahu could." is an independent clause either? Hell, I dunno; I'll keep lookin' into it.

ashleytwo
September 22nd, 2010, 19:36
If you were asked "which of the boys could do it?" you could respond "Kahu could" so it works in that sense as its own clause.

3ngrishsensei
September 22nd, 2010, 22:11
I'm not 100% sure on this, but I think the verb phrase "can do" needs an object. He can do. I could do. The boys could do.
All those sound strange.

Give your JTE examples of other verbs that need objects. "Put" is a good one. Usually put needs and object and a direct object: "I put the book in the box." It would be strange to say "I put." or "I put the book."

hmm. It's a tough one. Let me know if you find a better explanation.

Edit:
You could mention that by omitting "it" the sentence is a bit ambiguous. In the first clause the boys could do "it" (referring to whatever task), but in the second clause by omitting "it" you could be implying that the task Kahu could do is something else.