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LostInTranslation
June 6th, 2011, 00:35
I've taken three years of Japanese at a university level, but haven't really kept up with it over the last year and a half or so. Have about 8 weeks left before I move to Tokyo to work eikaiwa. What are some good tips or methods for practical study before I go to the island?

skitch_84
June 6th, 2011, 04:29
I've taken three years of Japanese at a university level, but haven't really kept up with it over the last year and a half or so. Have about 8 weeks left before I move to Tokyo to work eikaiwa. What are some good tips or methods for practical study before I go to the island?

Hi LostInTranslation.

I just graduated from university with a degree in Asian Studies and have been trying to keep up on my Japanese over the summer so that I'm not rusty by the time I get to Japan in late July/early August. I've been trying to do the following few things daily:

1. Electronic Flashcards (i-Pod apps are great for this - JFlash, Anki, etc.). This helps me keep up on vocabulary.

2. Reading manga in Japanese (there are plenty of sites that allow you to read untranslated manga online).

3. Watch Japanese films and/or TV (either without subtitles or, if you must, use Japanese subtitles). I've found lots of great Japanese TV on Youtube and it's really great listening practice.

4. Talk with friends in Japanese, either in person or on Skype or on the phone. Preferably you should be speaking to native Japanese speakers of course, but any classmates or friends who are at your level or above is better than nothing.

If you want any recommendations for sources just PM me :)

Miss_igirisu
June 6th, 2011, 11:48
Lang-8.com is the most effective method of practicing and checking your Japanese in real settings (not just textbook stuff or memorising words, you're talking about your own feelings and your own experiences) and also you can clearly see where you've gone wrong too.

Japanesepod101 is also good.

Blogs like tofugu are also helpful, I can't vouch for the stuff you have to pay for though.

skitch_84
June 6th, 2011, 12:10
I can vouch for the effectiveness of Lang-8 as well. When I got back from studying abroad I didn't have time to immediately jump back into a university Japanese class so I decided to keep a Japanese blog. I had each entry checked by native Japanese speakers which allowed me to see where I was making mistakes and make improvement where needed. If you decide to sign up for an account just don't forget to return the favor and correct some entries of the person who helped you! :)

LostInTranslation
June 7th, 2011, 12:32
I'm not at a level where I could write a blog in Japanese about anything other than what my favorite foods are lol

Miss_igirisu
June 7th, 2011, 12:35
It's cool- I don't blog about anything profound in Chinese yet either. Mainly what time I get up and some other simple past tense stuff.

It's good practice though

skitch_84
June 7th, 2011, 12:37
I'm not at a level where I could write a blog in Japanese about anything other than what my favorite foods are lol

If you feel you've gotten really rusty, I think my best suggestion for you would be to go back through some of the textbooks you used in university. You may be surprised how much grammar and vocabulary comes back to you. Then try to use it!

SnowRabbit
June 8th, 2011, 00:50
I've taken three years of Japanese at a university level, but haven't really kept up with it over the last year and a half or so. Have about 8 weeks left before I move to Tokyo to work eikaiwa. What are some good tips or methods for practical study before I go to the island?

I would highly recommend using Anki. If you've used any of the more popular textbooks, you'll find that people have already done most of the review work for you by making the flashcards for vocab, kanji, grammar, etc.

mothy
June 10th, 2011, 23:22
I'd recommend learning a language that's spoken in a country that won't become irrelevent within the next 10 years.

skitch_84
June 10th, 2011, 23:43
I'd recommend learning a language that's spoken in a country that won't become irrelevent within the next 10 years.

Regardless of what happens economically, my Japanese friends won't become irrelevant. Money was never my reason for learning Japanese.

mothy
June 11th, 2011, 00:26
Unless your friends are brainless jackasses that cant learn English after six years of schooling you can speak to them without using their worthless mother tongue.

greengoo
June 13th, 2011, 09:25
I have it on good authority that everytime Mothy feels joy, a small implant in his skull sends an electrical shock throughout his entire body. Fortunately, it's never seen use.

usernamefail
June 13th, 2011, 19:22
God forbid he felt overwhelming happiness.. he'd fry himself. Like an actual moth in one of those bug zappers.

LostInTranslation
June 13th, 2011, 23:33
The bitterness is almost palpable on these forums lol

mothy
June 14th, 2011, 06:38
I don't know why knowing the truth means I'm bitter. Perhaps you're just naive.