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EMTQueen
June 28th, 2011, 14:24
My mom is the kind of person that hits up yard sales every Saturday, buys from Goodwill, and finds every sale in a 50-mile radius and buys multiples of stuff we don't use. As a result, I have most of the stuff I would need, especially kitchen items. I'm just wondering if it was more cost-effective to pack up the stuff (e.g., pots, pans, cooking utensils, small appliances) and ship it to myself in Japan (obviously if I don't need it or have the room, I won't ship it) rather than buy it there.

What have been your experiences with shipping?

kawaiijutsu
June 28th, 2011, 15:57
id say pack the normal things, and if you want try to pack some of those bits if you have left over space. Like Rommy said, you can pick up a lot of that easy in Japan. I'd say is there's a specialty tool in there, focus on things like that rather than pots/pans. Definitely not worth it to ship them with you outside of your luggage that you're bringing anyway.

Tarquin
June 28th, 2011, 18:00
it will be a lot cheaper to buy it here.
plus you might arrive and find that you have all the essentials already in your apartment.
You can buy 99% of all cooking utensils in Japan. I’ve never came across anything I couldn’t get. It’s not some backwards 3rd world country.

word
June 28th, 2011, 18:14
My mom is the kind of person that hits up yard sales every Saturday, buys from Goodwill, and finds every sale in a 50-mile radius and buys multiples of stuff we don't use.
http://j.static-locatetv.com/images/content/mid/4/47793_hoarders.jpg

word
June 28th, 2011, 18:16
Wait, this one's even better:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_1imsP8GVDSM/TIfw9wo7TKI/AAAAAAAABAU/V4pBwI97470/s1600/hoarder-decision-process.gif

Hikari
June 28th, 2011, 18:41
more like

http://fattony.transworld.net/files/2009/09/hoarders.jpg

WaIdroon
June 29th, 2011, 13:13
......I'm just wondering if it was more cost-effective to pack up the stuff (e.g., pots, pans, cooking utensils, small appliances) and ship it to myself in Japan (obviously if I don't need it or have the room, I won't ship it) rather than buy it there.

What have been your experiences with shipping?

A large, heavy box shipped by air mail will probably run you about $100. For $100 you could buy all the pots, pans, dishes and utensils you could ever use.

Just go to a 100 yen store, AEON, etc. and you'll be able to find loads of cheap stuff.

Additionally, your predecessor probably left you a kitchen full of shit already. You should probably talk to them.

word
June 29th, 2011, 13:30
A large, heavy box shipped by air mail will probably run you about $100. For $100 you could buy all the pots, pans, dishes and utensils you could ever use.

Just go to a 100 yen store, AEON, etc. and you'll be able to find loads of cheap stuff.

Additionally, your predecessor probably left you a kitchen full of shit already. You should probably talk to them.word

EMTQueen
June 29th, 2011, 17:01
http://j.static-locatetv.com/images/content/mid/4/47793_hoarders.jpg


Wait, this one's even better:

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_1imsP8GVDSM/TIfw9wo7TKI/AAAAAAAABAU/V4pBwI97470/s1600/hoarder-decision-process.gif


more like

http://fattony.transworld.net/files/2009/09/hoarders.jpg





These are all accurate.

ten_of_spades
July 1st, 2011, 10:06
Ugh, I hate that show. I wish they'd just take the hoarder on a "vacation" (cough, mental hospital) for a week, throw out all their shit, then let them back once they're done. It looks like they get barely 20% of the clutter cleared from those houses.

Instead of mailing sporks and commemorative NASCAR plates, use that weight allowance for something useful like winter clothes.

lilyanphino
July 1st, 2011, 11:32
Ugh, I hate that show. I wish they'd just take the hoarder on a "vacation" (cough, mental hospital) for a week, throw out all their shit, then let them back once they're done. It looks like they get barely 20% of the clutter cleared from those houses.

Instead of mailing sporks and commemorative NASCAR plates, use that weight allowance for something useful like winter clothes.

This. There is absolutely no reason to not buy house stuff in Japan.

Page
July 4th, 2011, 15:38
The only thing you need to bring is

- clothes (shoes if you're bigfoot) Even this can be kept minimum if you can fit into/buy clothes here
- laptop (bring all your music, TV, movies, pictures from home on here)

Additionally if you're a finicky person:

- deodorant/toothpaste/face wash/meds/makeup (stuff that you're so attached to that you'd rather spend the money to send it to yourself than buy new stuff. I mailed a box ahead of myself with my favorite hair product, toothpaste (since I have sensitive teefs), face wash, no-berbies pills and makeup.)

Anything else isn't necessary. I shipped books to myself but I don't think I've read even one of them.

Aside from winter jackets, if you can fit into Japanese sizes I'd be wary of sending them over--you can always just buy winter clothes here, too.

WaIdroon
July 4th, 2011, 17:31
The only thing you need to bring is

- clothes (shoes if you're bigfoot) Even this can be kept minimum if you can fit into/buy clothes here
- laptop (bring all your music, TV, movies, pictures from home on here)

Additionally if you're a finicky person:

- deodorant/

Wait what? I'd say that everyone should bring that.

I live pretty inaka but I've never seen deodorant (that actual has an anti-antiperspirant in it) for sale other than online stores. Considering it weighs almost nothing and takes up only a little space, I would tell any incoming ALT to pack a few extra sticks.

Page
July 4th, 2011, 20:36
True enough, I know some people say it's a waste of space but I definitely brought a bunch with me.

Gezora
July 4th, 2011, 23:03
Deoderant in Japan is just weird. Very rarely can you get anything resembling American style deoderant outside of liquid roll on or the cakey white stick antiperspirant made by Soft Stone. The rest is a bizarre assortment of questionable sprays, lotions, splash on liquid, and wet naps. Oh, and spray on powder. I'll be that is fun to put on.

The only readily available brand of toothpaste sold in Japan that contains fluoride is Aquafresh Extreme Clean. You will understand when anyone over the age of 25 smiles at you.

ten_of_spades
July 5th, 2011, 07:10
You can place deodorant sticks inside whatever shoes/boots you pack so they don't take up any additional room.

Also, if you find yourself in Japan and deodorant-less, use baking soda. Even the bags of it from the 100-yen shops there work great (I'd say they're superior to what's sold in grocery stores...at least for deodorant purposes).

I bought a seasoning shaker from Daiso last year, filled it with baking soda (it dispenses just the right amount) and haven't looked back. No more suckling the teat of Old Spice for me!

Gezora
July 5th, 2011, 11:18
I don't doubt this solution, but now more than ever, you are the biggest cheapskate I have ever encountered.

edit: And you know, you could make toothpaste out of the baking soda too, right?

Lego
July 5th, 2011, 11:41
Deoderant in Japan is just weird. Very rarely can you get anything resembling American style deoderant outside of liquid roll on or the cakey white stick antiperspirant made by Soft Stone. The rest is a bizarre assortment of questionable sprays, lotions, splash on liquid, and wet naps. Oh, and spray on powder. I'll be that is fun to put on.

The only readily available brand of toothpaste sold in Japan that contains fluoride is Aquafresh Extreme Clean. You will understand when anyone over the age of 25 smiles at you.

Mr. Gezora,

We here at Lego have stockpiled the Old Spice anti-stench stick and Crest tooth polish powder. For it is heavy weight, in suitcase going home is wasteful. I send the items and disposable chopsticks to your destitute person, yes? What do you have in return? We are still waiting.

Thanks to you,
Lego

ten_of_spades
July 5th, 2011, 23:46
I don't doubt this solution, but now more than ever, you are the biggest cheapskate I have ever encountered.

edit: And you know, you could make toothpaste out of the baking soda too, right?

For once, that solution had nothing to do with being cheap. I ran out of deodorant in Japan and looked up some DIY ideas online until I could order some real stuff. It ended up being so effective I never bothered switching back.

The fact that it's cheaper was just a nice bonus.

(and homemade toothpaste sounds like it would taste like ass)

patjs
July 7th, 2011, 17:25
don't ship any kind of utensils or household items unless it is some sort of super-expensive spatula or something that would be cheaper to ship.

ship your winter clothes and pack the rest of your clothes in your suitcase and you are set.