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View Full Version : Is "eigo kyoushi" an appropriate term to use to describe yourself as a JET ALT?



jamesp
June 30th, 2011, 11:04
nt

WaIdroon
June 30th, 2011, 11:06
No. Call yourself an ALT.

ten_of_spades
June 30th, 2011, 11:10
ALT or eigo no kyoushi both work. I found the latter worked better because not everyone uses/knows the term ALT.

Never use sensei though because, other than the fact the ALT is on the lowest rung, sensei is an honourific so it's a bit pretentious to use it when referring to oneself.

jamesp
June 30th, 2011, 11:14
ALT or eigo no kyoushi both work. I found the latter worked better because not everyone uses/knows the term ALT.

Never use sensei though because, other than the fact the ALT is on the lowest rung, sensei is an honourific so it's a bit pretentious to use it when referring to oneself.

Ah, yeah, I understand the difference between kyoushi and sensei, but I just wasn't sure if using eigo no kyoushi was inappropriate as well. Like, whether or not the true JTEs would find me using that term offensive. You know like, "You're not the eigo kyoushi, I am."

ten_of_spades
June 30th, 2011, 11:19
Depends on how high-strung the JTE is, and on the particular circumstances. If you're doing a self-intro in the staffroom at the start of the school year, go with ALT to be safe. If you're talking with your neighbour, kyoushi is fine. Overall though, most JTEs won't go to pieces if you use kyoushi.

(most..)

UPGRAYEDD
June 30th, 2011, 11:28
We are not kyoshi so the correct term is "shido joshu" for assistant teacher.

Easy_money
June 30th, 2011, 11:36
Yes, use ALT or eigo shido joshu / gaikokugo shido joshu

UPGRAYEDD
June 30th, 2011, 11:38
If you use "kyoshi" peeps are going get confused and think you have a Japanese teaching license and actual responsibility and we don't want peeps to have the wrong impression, right?

jamesp
June 30th, 2011, 12:06
If you use "kyoshi" peeps are going get confused and think you have a Japanese teaching license and actual responsibility and we don't want peeps to have the wrong impression, right?

Being a gaijin, I highly doubt any Japanese person would think that. I'm only trying to not offend.

UPGRAYEDD
June 30th, 2011, 12:10
Yea actually if you say "kyoshi" they will probably think - who the hell does this gaijin think he is telling me he's a real teacher when he's really an ALT?

They will think that while smiling very politely.

Jojo
June 30th, 2011, 14:09
Also dont say please - people will think your bossing them around

WaIdroon
June 30th, 2011, 14:39
Being a gaijin, I highly doubt any Japanese person would think that. I'm only trying to not offend.

Then just say "ALT".

jamesp
June 30th, 2011, 21:25
Then just say "ALT".

From what I understand, ALT is not a widely used term in Japan, nor is it widely understood. Keep in mind I am NOT asking whether or not eigo kyoushi is the CORRECT term, only whether or not it is appropriate.

Strange_quark
June 30th, 2011, 22:51
I'm opting for "gaikokugo shidō joshu".

And when that doesn't work, I'll try to communicate it through charades "I pretend to know what I'm talking when attempting to assist English language teaching."

Page
July 1st, 2011, 21:15
No, it is not appropriate. You are not a licensed teacher, let alone a teacher at all.

jamesp
July 1st, 2011, 23:41
Well, I am a licensed teacher of English in the US. Does that make a difference?

ten_of_spades
July 2nd, 2011, 01:42
Not really. The Japanese teachers licence is all they care about.

It's really not the end of the world to refer to yourself as kyoushi though, unless you're a dick about it. A sure-fire way to be treated like a drooling retard is to prostrate and scrape in front of the other teachers with how lowly you are (though at the same time, don't act like you're hot shit because that won't get you anywhere).

Look, act and speak professionally and they won't care what you call yourself.

3liter6
July 2nd, 2011, 03:06
Well, I am a licensed teacher of English in the US. Does that make a difference?

I don't understand what the objection to ALT or naninani-shidoujyoshu is? It's your job title.

Most of the younger (at least into mid-30s) Japanese I know are familiar with the concept of ALT as they had an ALT in school. For those that aren't, giving them your job title in Japanese isn't going to confuse them. It's their language, I think they can handle it. Telling them you're an eigo sensei/kyoushi is likely to confuse them more as most know what's required to become a teacher, or they'll just write it off as a J-go noob mistake.

We're legally not supposed to take a lead teacher role in the classroom so it's wrong and inaccurate to refer to yourself as a kyoushi. No matter what you call yourself, you're just another fucking gaijin teaching english, I wouldn't get so caught up in terminology. Nobody worth impressing is going to care.

jamesp
July 2nd, 2011, 04:28
Not really. The Japanese teachers licence is all they care about.

It's really not the end of the world to refer to yourself as kyoushi though, unless you're a dick about it. A sure-fire way to be treated like a drooling retard is to prostrate and scrape in front of the other teachers with how lowly you are (though at the same time, don't act like you're hot shit because that won't get you anywhere).

Look, act and speak professionally and they won't care what you call yourself.

I'm just kidding, obviously my licensure in America is irrelevant. Anyways, your first answer gave me all the information I needed, thanks!

Tyr
July 2nd, 2011, 05:44
Saying you're an English teacher will make them think you've passed all the exams and are a proper certified teacher?
What is the term for eikawa and other low grade English teachers?- saying you're an English teacher I'd have thought would bring those assosiations.

jamesp
July 2nd, 2011, 05:55
Just use English teacher. That's what I'm going to do. Unless you speak fluent Japanese, no one is going to think you're properly certified and no one is going to care if you use the term.

ten_of_spades
July 2nd, 2011, 12:35
We're legally not supposed to take a lead teacher role in the classroom so it's wrong and inaccurate to refer to yourself as a kyoushi. No matter what you call yourself, you're just another fucking gaijin teaching english, I wouldn't get so caught up in terminology. Nobody worth impressing is going to care.

That's not true (anymore). A few years ago MEXT went to get a court ruling confirming that Gary Gaijin can't lead a class, be left alone in the classroom, etc.. etc.. and, much to MEXT's surprise, the court said "hm, no" and ruled ALTs count as 'expert instructors'.

Real responsibilities for fake-ass teachers, basically. It's particular true at elementary schools that don't necessarily have a set curriculum. I rarely had a homeroom teacher come to ES lessons; they just told me 'use your best judgement and have fun'.

3liter6
July 2nd, 2011, 13:02
That's not true (anymore). A few years ago MEXT went to get a court ruling confirming that Gary Gaijin can't lead a class, be left alone in the classroom, etc.. etc.. and, much to MEXT's surprise, the court said "hm, no" and ruled ALTs count as 'expert instructors'.


Good to know. It appears I'll be leading some Elementary classes myself, which is both scary and exciting.

MCAS
July 3rd, 2011, 09:03
That's not true (anymore). A few years ago MEXT went to get a court ruling confirming that Gary Gaijin can't lead a class, be left alone in the classroom, etc.. etc.. and, much to MEXT's surprise, the court said "hm, no" and ruled ALTs count as 'expert instructors'.

Real responsibilities for fake-ass teachers, basically. It's particular true at elementary schools that don't necessarily have a set curriculum. I rarely had a homeroom teacher come to ES lessons; they just told me 'use your best judgement and have fun'.

This sounds like my situation. My pred told me that at my school the ALT is expected to lead the class. Thank god for having friends who have done this before who are willing to let me crib lesson plans off of and that I have some teaching experience.

ten_of_spades
July 4th, 2011, 13:13
Elementary school kids love the treasure hunt game...hide cards with themed pictures (food, animals, etc..) around the classroom, do a vocab lesson, then for the game split them into 2 teams, say "apple" or whatever and the first team to find the apple card gets a point.

Easy peasy. Kids aren't hard to impress (that's why they're still kids).

Page
July 4th, 2011, 15:22
For the most part I don't get left alone (though some pretty much fall asleep at the back of the class at ES), only when kids are being douches and need to get yelled at.

At JHS though I don't go without the JTE. If she's sick all classes are cancelled for the day. SWEET.

Marvellous Magician
July 4th, 2011, 17:57
You should call yourself kyoushi and you'll get mad props from almost anyone for it. I guarantee 90% of the time you answer 'what is your job' with 'kyoushi', or more specifically '[school] gakkou no kyoushi' they will go 'ehhh sensei??!?'

This is useful for getting the police off your back.

jamesp
July 5th, 2011, 00:25
You should call yourself kyoushi and you'll get mad props from almost anyone for it. I guarantee 90% of the time you answer 'what is your job' with 'kyoushi', or more specifically '[school] gakkou no kyoushi' they will go 'ehhh sensei??!?'

This is useful for getting the police off your back.

Good to know.

patjs
July 5th, 2011, 07:23
whoever said that telling someone you are a "kyoushi" will confuse people might be talking about other teachers or people who know about the education system. your average redneck in the inaka has no clue what the difference is. most young people will know what an ALT is if they had one in school, but people over 30 seem to have no clue and you can say kyoushi, which will get you some street cred with some people.

also the PTA people may be more in the know than others. the guy who cut my hair once flipped out because I had some chalk on my pants and apparently he thought it was "eeeeeee" worthy that the ALT actually wrote something on the board. (I also had one JTE that seemed really reluctant to ever let me write on the board. No idea what the deal with this is).

3696
July 5th, 2011, 11:30
when i hear my students talking about me in hushed tones on the train they use words like "sensei" and "kyoushi". LOL guys! they must think that i have some sort of official jeepernese license!!

AVN
July 5th, 2011, 18:19
Question for everyone saying we shouldn't refer to ourselves as Kyoushi. Why is it then that most of the Japanese people I know (some JTEs I work with) introduce me to other people as an eigo no sensei? They must know I have no license... They know I'm an ALT so why do they say sensei not ALT (some do say ALT too though)?

Also I'm curious what you think an eikaiwa teacher should be called in Japanese.

Easy_money
July 5th, 2011, 21:40
Question for everyone saying we shouldn't refer to ourselves as Kyoushi. Why is it then that most of the Japanese people I know (some JTEs I work with) introduce me to other people as an eigo no sensei? They must know I have no license... They know I'm an ALT so why do they say sensei not ALT (some do say ALT too though)?

Also I'm curious what you think an eikaiwa teacher should be called in Japanese.

They're just being nice.

word
July 5th, 2011, 22:16
Yeah, just think: what if they found out that you weren't actually a teacher? They'd probably confront you angrily, causing an embarrassing public spectacle, and forever branding you as a liar.


Seriously, people; it's not really that big a deal. Who cares? Most Japanese people will pretend to be impressed if you get as far as "watashi wa...."

silverx7
July 23rd, 2011, 10:59
or how about you just introduce yourself like a normal person

nine times out of ten once they ask you why you are here and you tell them you are working they say "eigo no sensei?"

seriously dont think to much into the sensei/kyoshi/ bullsh*t'orama word debacle

also remember we have the gaijin card meaning that we have leeway regarding using the exact right words

Alphabet
July 25th, 2011, 13:08
Yeah, I agree. Don't stress out about it!

Scrotty
July 26th, 2011, 13:48
If you use "kyoshi" peeps are going get confused and think you have a Japanese teaching license and actual responsibility and we don't want peeps to have the wrong impression, right?
:012:

Sciby
August 2nd, 2011, 08:38
Sorry, but what does a Japanese teaching licence have to do with anything? Would you whip it out if you're asked what you do in a bar?

If your co-workers introduce you as "sensei", use that. If you're talking to someone who isn't in education, say "sensei". If you're introducing yourself to someone within the education system, say ALT. If you go for ultra-fussy-yet-accurate titles, you won't look professional and self-aware of your place in The System - you will look like a wanker. There are more important things to overthink than this.