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adammoogle
May 21st, 2004, 08:15
i just ate it for the first time today and i wasn't at all impressed. the rice was stodgy, i didn't mind the prawn one cos it didn't taste of anything much but the rest of the unidentifiable fish was, well, just fishy...

i hope theres tastier stuff over there... :cry:

also, i had fishy breath all day afterwards and kept making big fish smelling burps, is this normal???? :?:

katharine
May 21st, 2004, 08:23
You have just experienced.... Bad Sushi. I totally will not touch sushi from most sushi places for that reason. :wink: I live in probably the most Japaneseified city in the U.S. but I still won't touch it except at certain restaurants. It's gotta be perfectly fresh and well made, or else it's gross!! But I do enjoy sushi in general. My favorites are spicy tuna roll, california roll (American roll, doesn't exist in Japan :lol: ), and inari sushi.

Oh, and what does stodgy mean? :)

Rycean
May 21st, 2004, 09:23
Strangely i quite enjoy cooking and care to think of myself as fairly proficient. I am the only student i know who has actually gone out and made sushi. I really like it; its nicer knowing i have made it myself i.e the rice and vinegar witht eh sea weed wraps and fillings. I have a local japanese korean store in cardiff near to my uni digs so i pop in there to get stuff.

I am hoping to learn japanese and test it out on the lady in the shop last time i went in she couldn't speak much english and so was a job specifiying what i needed but luckily knew most of the japanese names and had made a list before hand. I berrated myself in not trying to sound competant by saying hello in japanese etc. So when i learn a bit more i am going to go in and challenge myself to ask for some food items in her local tongue.

The watasabi paste (i.e the horseraddish stuff) really blows your socks off so its kinda hard to put it in the right proportions but i love the pickled pink ginger could eat loads of that stuff. Looking forward to actually visiting japan proper and teying all the different delicacies!!!!

Rycean

Mere
May 21st, 2004, 11:16
Speaking from personal experiences:

Good luck finding california rolls in Japan. THese are mostly found at universities.

As for sushi... When my friend and her family took me out for a "sushi" dinner I was presented with raw fish (no maki rolls!). I had sashimi (manguro-->cubed tuna) and various other types of sealife including baby octopus which was suprisingly tasty and boneless!

I've also had maki rolls at functions, but they were much smaller and didn't have as many fillings as were used to in the U.S.

If you're an adventurous eater, you've got nothing to worry about. If you're a picky eater... make sure you know what you're asking. ;)

Hope I haven't ruined your tastes for "sushi." :wink:

~Mere

zkac054
May 21st, 2004, 11:21
Nigiri Sushi (Pressed version) is what most of you are probably thinking about. But I love the stuff, and just had some the other night. Have to agree though, it has to be fresh otherwise it's just terrible. The stuff here is so much better than back home.

Shotokai
May 21st, 2004, 17:05
stodgy is a thick texture that usually sticks to the roof of your mouth.

katharine
May 21st, 2004, 17:09
Ewwwww gross.

WuTAN
May 21st, 2004, 19:46
Sushi is just yum ^_^
There are a few 'decent' sushi joints in London... it'll cost you to go to the tastier places though. I prefer the buffet and conveyor belt varieties (it's a lot more fun). I often go to either Gili Gulu (I know it's not the best, but it's fun) or Hi Sushi in Soho, both do all-you-can-eat deals for around £10-£13.50. Much better than paying £3.50 for a plate at Yo! Sushi, ne? :P

Paper
May 21st, 2004, 20:52
For those of you who live in Western Canada (which I guess is none of the people who posted! aww!) you will be sorely dissapointed by the selection of sushi in Japan.

Especially so at official parties. Official parties generally have more expensive pieces. One thing I've learned about Japan is that the more expensive a food item is, the more gross it is (fish testicles in sperm sauce come to mind, but that's not sushi and would be for another topic).

Safe sushi pieces are usually tuna (maguro) or salmon (sake). They are rarely slimey. Octopus is sometimes a bit chewy (ie, if you aren't a swallower, you'll be chewing for a good minute), and sometimes slimey. Uni and natto of course are disgusting. Anything that looks like snot should be avoided. It's all up to personal taste though.

Xeno
May 23rd, 2004, 18:00
I heard California roll exists in Japan but it seems to be called "sarada-maki" (salad roll) instead. :wink:

Dave
May 23rd, 2004, 20:18
I am genuinely frightened of sushi :?

adammoogle
May 23rd, 2004, 20:48
have u have bad fish experiences before????

also, with the suishi i had there were these little tiny cuts of relly thin meat which tasted quite spicy, what the hell did i eat??? (not to worry you dave but it looked like butt cheek) 8O

and this paste stuff, looked like frozen snot, i didn't dare try that...is it good?

o, and there was a little bottle of this brown sauce stuff, i kept that because it looked cool, not sure what it is though...

all in all though if thats the worst i'll be expected to eat bring it on!!! :twisted:

yabighoor
May 24th, 2004, 02:15
really thin meat were probably strips of ginger.

Brown sauce-soy sauce.

Can't remember what snot stuff is but think its quite spicy and yuou mix soy sauce with it and dip your sushi into it.

wow the irish fountain of knowledge speaks

Mere
May 24th, 2004, 04:10
Nigiri Sushi (Pressed version) is what most of you are probably thinking about.

Yes! I couldn't remember the name (very in=mportant when expressing what you like). :wink:

It's funny how foods with the same name take on different personas when transplanted into another culture.

~Mere

Fyrey
May 24th, 2004, 11:22
and this paste stuff, looked like frozen snot, i didn't dare try that...is it good?

Wasabe. Are you talking about the wasabe? Yeah, its awesome. Indeed necessary to eat Sushi. In fact, eating sushi without it, is kind of like drinking beer that isn't carbonated.

Carbonated.... is that even a word? It sounds funny when you say it alone.

Carbonated.

hmm.

Xeno
May 24th, 2004, 11:44
I LOVE WASABI! Can't eat sushi without it. I'm mad for the stimulus. :twisted: :D

Most Japanese people seem to like eating sushi with wasabi. I guess you can order sushi without wasabi but for Japanese adults doing that sounds like kids coz kids generally don't like wasabi. So if you don't wanna be thought a little kid, try it. :D Well, just kidding. Don't take it seriously. It's up to you...actually. :wink:

charliemac
May 24th, 2004, 11:50
Fresh sushi is a must for sure. I have found that I am not to fond of most of the American versions of sushi....especially any that contain cream cheese...daikirai. Even with the fresh sushi however I've found that I've had 'fishy' burps but...em... it still tasted good :lol: In short I love the stuff but it must be fresh, have wasabi+soy and a some of the pickled ginger....and a nice karafe of sake. mmmm.

monos
May 24th, 2004, 23:12
Hi,
I am a waitress at a sushi restaurant. I get free sushi and other yummy Japanese food every time I work. Wasabi and pickled ginger are great with sushi, and if you don't like the taste of the fish, the ginger and wasabi can work wonders to cover up any yucky fish you may not enjoy. The trick is to pour some soya sauce into your small side dish, pinch a small bit of wasabi with your chopsticks and mush it into your say sauce. Then dip your treats and chow down. There are many options of sushi for non fish lovers and veggies alike. Maki is easier for the newcomer and sashimi is for those who want the fish and nothing but. Don't be afraid (unless the sake/salmon is farmed, but that is another story). Tomago, ebi, inari and kappa are great options for non raw fish (the shrimp is cooked). It is so much fun to eat and tastes great. I'll try to answer any sushi questions you may have. I can't wait to go for some fresh authentic sushi and maki.

starnia
May 26th, 2004, 00:46
Sushi certainly isn't the number one reason, but it is among the top reasons I am going to Japan.

I am allergic to seaweed, but I love nigiri.

Also, they make some incredible rolls out of rice paper instead of seaweed...any chance of something like that in Japan? I have also seen tortillas used. That was also wonderful!

hgl
May 26th, 2004, 15:53
I love sushi...the ginger, wasabi, ... and some of the stuff I still don't know the name of, but mmm taste good.
It was defintely an aquired taste. At first I would only eat the california rolls, but soon I tried other kinds - like the sashimi, and well I'm hooked. In fact, my friend and I go at least twice a week and have attempted to make our own. I don't know what it is that that makes us keep wanting more. at one point we swore our local sushi joint must have cooked with some addictive substance.....maybe in the soy sauce. Anyways, I would encourage everyone to give it a try, even if you don't want the fish there are good vegetable varieties.

However, to my dismay, I heard sushi is quite expensive in Japan, and not a daily meal for the average person. does anyone know if this is true?

steelqueen
June 6th, 2004, 09:53
My first love in sushi was inarizushi :P su-meshi stuffed in abura-age pouches (i.e. rice treated with rice wine, vinegar, and sugar, stuffed into thin, fried tofu pouches). Very unadventurous. I never used to eat seafood at all, but as soon as I decided I wanted to go to Japan, I started.

I really, really like grilled eel maki or nigiri, it's unexpectedly sweet. Recently I tried sashimi salmon, and it was good! Very fresh, not fishy at all. :) Yay!

I am, however, trying to expose myself slowly to a greater variety of Japanese food, since you can't eat sushi all the time. It was invented as a quick, relatively cheap snack. *shrugs* I have a Japanese cookbook that spends half it's pages explaining about Japanese ingredients, cooking techniques, crockery and utensils, the influence of Buddhism on the diet, etc. Japanese Cooking by Emi Kazuko with recipes by Yasuko Fukuoka. It's a very good book in you're very interested, plus it has lovely pictures. Even if you can't cook, you can learn what different food names are, and what's in the food you're eating. In Japan, Uni is not a cute cartoon winged unicorn, it's sea urchin ovaries. :D Just for example.

cottamg
June 6th, 2004, 10:49
I am genuinely frightened of sushi :?

As am I..

quote from Robin Williams.

" I don't think sushi means raw fish at all.... I think it means, "haha, they ate it!"" :)

Jay
June 6th, 2004, 12:17
I'm from Western Canada and I must say for a city of 650,000, Winnipeg has some exceptional sushi places. Yum!

Rustweaver
June 6th, 2004, 12:29
I hated sushi the first time I tried it. A bunch of the raw types took some acquiring of taste to become 'edible'. On the other hand there are a few that I liked initially. I tried a bunch of different types and found these. My favorite types of sushi involve fresh water eel.

Yum! EEEEEELLLL!

IowaJET
June 6th, 2004, 13:19
The sauce with eel is so so good. Try it! I don't like a lot of sashimi, but fatty tuna is fabulous...it's so smooth it doesn't taste raw at all.

professor_chimpenstein
June 6th, 2004, 21:54
Not so sure about sushi :o but saying that ive never tried it

as a back up plan im taking an industrial size bottle of tabasco sauce.

Anything you add it too instantly has its own flavour replaced by that of a spicy chilli. Not that im against trying new things but if i dont like em at least I have a "Everything tastes like chilli" back up plan.

:) James