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jwkelley
November 24th, 2011, 23:35
Arashi is famous.

hanshin tigers are famous.

Shouldnt it be Arashi are famous because they are a group, like the hanshin tigers? That does not sound right though.

I guess i could go the hanshin tigers baseball team is famous.

uthinkimlost?
November 24th, 2011, 23:39
Arashi is famous.

hanshin tigers are famous.

Shouldnt it be Arashi are famous because they are a group, like the hanshin tigers? That does not sound right though.

I guess i could go the hanshin tigers baseball team is famous.

Arashi is ONE unit, so it is treated as such.

Just like lions ARE badass, whereas the pride of lions IS badass.

Technically I think since Hanshine Tigers is a team name it should be IS, but since it's an awkward name it dicks with you.

jwkelley
November 25th, 2011, 01:14
I think its also the way we use sports teams names. We pluralize them. It could even be a US thing.

Yankees, red sox, giants, the bears, bruins, packers......

Vs

Manchester United, Arsenal.

Antonath
November 25th, 2011, 09:50
It depends whether you're referring to them as a group of people or a single unit, like everyone's said, but they can switch. Compare:

"Arashi are celebrating after reaching number one"
"Arashi is my favourite band"

Both are ok, I think.

Gizmotech
November 25th, 2011, 13:13
It depends whether you're referring to them as a group of people or a single unit, like everyone's said, but they can switch. Compare:

"Arashi are celebrating after reaching number one"
"Arashi is my favourite band"

Both are ok, I think.

In that example you're fine because the group can be identified as a unit. With the Hanshin Tigers (or Yankees) you can't do that.

"The Yankees are celebrating after...."
"The Yankees is my favourite..." BLAMO... does not compute for me, it has to be plural are.

I wonder if it has to do with associating performance within the group. When I think of a band I don't think of the members, I think of the product. When I think of a sports team I'm thinking of the members, and I can't think of the team as having a product.

Antonath
November 25th, 2011, 14:02
Yankees does not compute because it's already a plural. Try it with Manchester United.

"Manchester United are celebrating after winning the FA Cup"
"Manchester United is the most famous football team in the world"

Gizmotech
November 25th, 2011, 14:27
Yankees does not compute because it's already a plural. Try it with Manchester United.

"Manchester United are celebrating after winning the FA Cup"
"Manchester United is the most famous football team in the world"

You might be dead on, and I can't think of a north american team without a pluralization of their name. Brain melting fun!

Antonath
November 25th, 2011, 15:35
LA Galaxy?

In fact, a lot of the US soccer teams have singular names, according to wikipedia. Must be because they use similar names to the european teams.

jwkelley
November 25th, 2011, 16:20
ok so if the unit is pluralized then go with ARE.

How would you do units where something besides the last word is pluralized?

N----- with Adetude is my favorite rap group.
N----- with Adetude is my favorite band.
N----- with Adetude are my favorite rap group
N----- with Adetude are my favorite ban.

Page
November 25th, 2011, 17:22
is

hunterofpeace
December 1st, 2011, 02:40
It may be the difference between British and American English. In the US, if the band has an "s" on the end, we think of it as plural. I think for most Americans, subject verb agreement trumps thinking of the band as a collection of people. "Arcade Fire is my favorite band. The Fleet Foxes are really awesome too." I think it's acceptable to teach them that different countries refer to bands differently.