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View Full Version : Money - How much is enough? Max



Kewne
December 21st, 2011, 21:36
So I guess this is a question that gets asked a lot (I've seen it at least a few times) and the answer is ESID, but I might be in the position where I'll need to figure out how much I need to keep of my savings soon.

Can anyone give me estimates about how much I'd need until payday in the worst case scenario? Like living in a city, with key money, no subsidised apart, the BOE not agreeing to lend any money, needing a car (though perhaps it'd be less likely in a city), etc.

uthinkimlost?
December 21st, 2011, 21:43
Worst case scenario: ¥300,000

Ini
December 21st, 2011, 21:45
I bought over 450000 but 300000 of that went on a car

Kewne
December 21st, 2011, 21:46
Ouch, I didn't even think of a car and how expensive that it.

Gezora
December 21st, 2011, 22:07
If you're a private and depending on your placement you could need up to 500,000 yen.

lilyanphino
December 21st, 2011, 22:10
I brought about 200000 yen and had no problems, but my BOE didn't ask me for rent or anything until after my first payday. I also didn't start getting charged for utilities until after my first payday. I was pretty lucky with this though and I have heard of other people who had to pay for stuff immediately.

Kewne
December 21st, 2011, 22:10
I appreciate these answers, but I don't like how they keep going up and up. :lol:

Assuming that it's 500,000 yen, that'd be just over £4000 UK money. I'm suddenly glad I didn't do JET last year, before I saved up from my previous job.

Ini
December 21st, 2011, 22:12
of course in those days you could ride the shink to osaka and back for 100yen and still have change left for a steak dinner at the 4 seasons. If you are buying a car and paying key money you could be hitting gez's 500000. Especially if its not a furnished apartment and you need to get washing machines and beds and jazz

word
December 21st, 2011, 22:13
If you're pressed for $, you should find out if you REALLY need a car. If you're in any sort of city, it may be possible to live relatively comfortably without one. It might be unpleasant but doable if you end up being short on funds.

Ini
December 21st, 2011, 22:19
It might be unpleasant but doable if you end up being short on funds.

leave how miss_doitsu funded her education out of this

Jojo
December 21st, 2011, 22:57
i brought 400,000 and spent a bit more than half on a car..and that included paying for the apartment crap etc

Kittens
December 22nd, 2011, 08:37
The husband and I brought 250,000 and used it up rather quickly... also ended up taking some money out of our American bank account to help cover the costs of my car. The more you save up, the easier it is to settle in.

HeartNana
December 22nd, 2011, 11:57
I brought 200,000ish, and ended up needing only about 130,000 till my first paycheck. And I was pretty much the opposite of somewho who was living conservatively, so yea...depends on what you have available to you when you first get here I guess.

Kewne
December 22nd, 2011, 20:55
Thanks all who answered. From the sound of it, it might be best to have about 500,000 earmarked for then in case of the worst situation, but not actually take all of it and try avoid costs where possible.

Prospective
December 23rd, 2011, 01:18
In my recent holiday experience, one of the best exchange rates I got was by withdrawing money from my ATM card at 7-11 in Japan. I plan on taking nothing and withdrawing money as I need it, unless I have a particularly rural placement, in which case I'd probably just do a big withdrawal at the Tokyo Orientation.

Eudox
December 23rd, 2011, 01:42
In my recent holiday experience, one of the best exchange rates I got was by withdrawing money from my ATM card at 7-11 in Japan. I plan on taking nothing and withdrawing money as I need it, unless I have a particularly rural placement, in which case I'd probably just do a big withdrawal at the Tokyo Orientation.

I think you may have missed a point or three...

Tyr
December 23rd, 2011, 19:33
that number is super worst case.
I brought £2000ish and I was perfectly fine- didn't even have to get money out of the bank after my first payday as I still had plenty left.

lemsip
December 23rd, 2011, 21:47
I brought £1000 on my first stint in 2003 and it was fine.

Merkypie
December 23rd, 2011, 21:50
That's like a decade ago. With inflation that 1000 is like 1800 ~ 2500.

Eudox
December 23rd, 2011, 21:55
That's like a decade ago. With inflation that 1000 is like 1800 ~ 2500.

Ahaha exactly what I was thinking. But yeah, I'm reasonably inaka with low rent and no key money. I brought 100,000 yen with me (I'd already paid 150,000 for my car), and I had to borrow/use my credit card for another 70,000 or so.

UPGRAYEDD
December 24th, 2011, 04:18
I brought 150,000 yen and only spend maybe 50,000.

Prospective
December 24th, 2011, 08:33
I think you may have missed a point or three...

Considering some people were counting the money they "have" as separate from the money they "bring", I don't think so.

I was just pointing out that one can access any funds they have saved in a home account easily.

As for how much one should have saved, well more is always better, as with any savings... The necessary amount seems to be no more than ¥500,000.

Sorry if my tangential information didn't seem to fit the topic.

lemsip
December 24th, 2011, 22:41
Ahaha exactly what I was thinking. But yeah, I'm reasonably inaka with low rent and no key money. I brought 100,000 yen with me (I'd already paid 150,000 for my car), and I had to borrow/use my credit card for another 70,000 or so.

To be fair, I revisited Japan for a month in 2008 and most things still cost the same. But aye, bring as much as you can. 500k seems way excessive though. Maybe if you're going off your own bat - but with JET there's no way you need that much.

agrilledfish
December 25th, 2011, 01:04
I brought ¥230,000 and only spent about ¥50,000 of it before my first paycheck. ¥500,000 seems high to me but I suppose it doesn't hurt to be careful. Once you get in contact with your pred you can find out how much you're really going to need.

Eudox
December 25th, 2011, 01:31
Yeah, it depends if you're counting buying a car etc. 500k is a buttload for general living expenses, but if you need to buy a car and pay key money (and work for interac) then you may need that much.

MJN
December 25th, 2011, 02:24
I took 90,000 and thought it was way too much - my BOE got my car for me and I started my 2-month repayment from my first paycheck.

Cytrix
December 27th, 2011, 16:00
I brought over about Y150,000. Y60,000 went to my car. I managed a'ok. Don't always guarantee you can access money from home. None of my cards work here (even my visa debit)...oh and please for the love of sweet baby Jesus check your credit card expiry. I misread mine and it expired a day after I arrived. Whoops

hunterofpeace
December 29th, 2011, 23:55
If your credit card is set to expire, say, a few months after you get to Japan, you can renew it early, yes? (I'm almost certain this is a stupid question)

Kewne
December 30th, 2011, 00:20
If your credit card is set to expire, say, a few months after you get to Japan, you can renew it early, yes? (I'm almost certain this is a stupid question)

This may depend on your bank, but I can't imagine a bank saying no to doing this. I did this when I went abroad without problems.

Lianwen
December 30th, 2011, 02:36
If your credit card is set to expire, say, a few months after you get to Japan, you can renew it early, yes? (I'm almost certain this is a stupid question)

Mine expired this September. While I hate Citibank usually, they did next day (I actually received them the day after, however, but it was still suuuper quick) deliver my new cards to me in Japan, on their dime, not mine. I just called and explained my situation.

Trivial
January 3rd, 2012, 15:01
I was an idiot and brought $200, and assumed I could pull the rest out when I got to Japan. My card didn't like that idea though, and the magnetic strip stopped working once I arrived.

Very luckily, my prefecture (Tokyo) gave a 150,000 yen "move-in bonus."

greengoo
January 4th, 2012, 01:57
I brought $2000 US, and regret bringing that much. It was totally overkill, and I feel like I spent most of it simply because I had monopoly money magically in my hands.

Do yourself a MASSIVE favor, try to get some stuff second hand (fridge, couch, tables, etc) before you go and blow your "free money" pile. After that, slowly buy the things you REALLY want after thinking it through (bed, TV, etc).

Froren
January 4th, 2012, 15:32
I brought about 300,000 yen and blew threw it really quick. Had to use almost all of it on my pred's car and then my BOE asked me for 40,000 to 70,000 YEN for various expenses pretty early on when I arrived. So in reality, what I brought was not even enough, but my placement is pretty far away from any big city and in a really bad winter area so a nice car is required. A kei car would be a deathtrap here.

orangy_yellow
January 29th, 2012, 20:38
I am a current ALT in Shizuoka prefecture. I live with my boyfriend in a 3 room apt. When we arrived our place was TOTALLY empty. Nothing but a few light bulbs and a roll of tp. You might be luckier and have all the stuff from all the JETs before you, but it might all be crap.

Bring as much money as you can. When you arrive in August you'll want to travel and keep cool. It will take a whole month before you get paid and your money runs out faster than you think.

If you are lucky, you'll have a great predecessor who'll give you all the information you need and leave stuff behind for you to have.

Good luck!

arcthemonkey
January 30th, 2012, 05:50
I think I lucked out, but I was panicking when I started thinking about saving money to go. I was unemployed at the time (had just quit my awful, soul-crushing job), and had about $1000 put away with a few months to go in the states.

I kept thinking, "What about cars?!", "What about key money and deposit?" and things like that.

I arrived in Japan with $600 in my checking account back home (I withdrew it at a 7-Eleven ATM over time. This and Post Office ATMs seemed to be the best rate, and had negligable fees). I was terrified.

Then everything came together. The rent on my apartment was 25,500 yen a month, with no deposit and no key money (My BOE owned the building), and my first month's rent wasn't due until my first paycheck. The place was furnished (although it was annoyingly missing some things) and my BoE provided a brand-new rice cooker, TWO brand new futons, and dozens of other little things. I even had enough rice left over from my pred to last for 2 months.

As for a car, I found out I really - really - didn't need one. Nobody in the area drove, and I lived across the street from a major train station. I wasn't allowed to drive to/from my schools anyway.

I ended up spending less than 40,000 yen in my first month, mostly because I was stingy as hell and people were taking me out to eat and treating me left and right.

So yeah, ESID and all that. One of my friends a few town over was basically billed by his BoE for ten man the day he arrived.

Try to contact your supervisor or your CIR if the town has one before you arrive. They can usually give you a good idea. My contract had a lot of information on that sort of thing, too (Like, you can have a car, but nobody else does and you can't use it for work).