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ChasingTheSun
October 11th, 2012, 21:50
This part of the forum seems kind of dead right now, probably because we're all working on our applications. However, I thought I'd start a discussion filled with optimism!

If/When you are accepted to JET, what are the top three new things you want to try when in Japan, that aren't directly related to being an awesome teacher?

Mine:
1. Learn how to snowboard (If I'm in a part of the country where that's plentiful).
2. Visit an izakaya
3. Learn more about kyudo

Hexi
October 12th, 2012, 02:56
i love these! XD

1: Eat Takyoyaki and kakigori at a Natsu Matsuri
2: Visit the Kyoto Costume Museum
3: Go to a nomihodai

Bonus: Buy a "weird" thing from a vending machine (by weird i mean something you can't find in a vending machine here)

Antonath
October 12th, 2012, 09:12
2. Visit an izakaya
You will have many, many opportunities to do this.


3: Go to a nomihodai
See above!


Bonus: Buy a "weird" thing from a vending machine (by weird i mean something you can't find in a vending machine here)
A lot of the truly weird vending machines are gone; I think Japan realised it was getting a reputation. There's still beer and cigarette machines, and those that sell (bad) hot food, though.

coop52
October 12th, 2012, 09:27
You'll have plenty of chances to eat and drink whatever, so don't fret! Here's a couple of things I recommend doing while you're here:

-Visit Okinawa. The beaches are really nice compared to the mainland, and the whole area has a nice, chill vibe.
-Try snowboarding/skiing. It gives you something to do in the winter besides sit at home. While I personally didn't care for it, I know several people that can only keep sane in the winter by going snowboarding every weekend.
-Visit Kyoto/Nara at least once. You can hit up all the major historical sites in a weekend. Do the maiko dress-up thing if you want, but be prepared to look kind of stupid doing it. It's fun, but the white face paint pretty much only looks good on Japanese people.

word
October 12th, 2012, 13:01
My list for the coming months...

1. Moar snowboarding.
2. Moar Japanese study.
3. Bang a schoolgirl (MG in a HS uniform + pigtails would work, I suppose).

Gizmotech
October 12th, 2012, 13:02
1) Wank
2) Wank more
3) Cry into pillow


Real list:
Travel the northern coast on local train. (Sooo much more enjoyable than bullet in the south)
Stay in Japan for Christmas and New Years. (It really is a different experience)
Find the smallest most out of the way matsuri in a near by town and just show up and talk to people.... you might end up drinking the night away for free (ahh, taiko drumming post performance party)

Hexi
October 12th, 2012, 14:31
i do plan to spend christmas and new years there. just beause it'll be so different. :) they all work on christmas day huh?

Hexi
October 12th, 2012, 14:39
A lot of the truly weird vending machines are gone; I think Japan realised it was getting a reputation. There's still beer and cigarette machines, and those that sell (bad) hot food, though.
Damn...... it would probably have been expensive anyways.....

Cytrix
October 12th, 2012, 15:03
If it's not on a weekend they work it. The 24th is a holiday so if you're lucky and that falls on a Sunday you'd get Christmas day off as well.

I will never work a Christmas day in my entire life...apart from this year where I'm volunteering at an Elephant rehabilitation Center

word
October 12th, 2012, 15:22
Weird; I always used to love working on holidays back in the 'States. The pay was always good (yanno, in the sh*tty hourly-wage jobs I was working back in HS and uni) and most folks are really nice to you. Also, it kept me from having to spend time with my family. ("Sorry dad; I hafta work that day. Yeah, they're being real a**holes about it; I can't get out of it. Guess I'll have to pass on that awkward dinner with your lunatic sister and her 'Happy Birthday, Jesus' malarkey.")

coop52
October 12th, 2012, 15:35
It depends on the holiday; I hated working Thanksgiving at the supermarket because the only customers were stressed out people trying to get their last minute things. Worst was the people who came in during the afternoon looking for a turkey. Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve were almost as bad.

Page
October 12th, 2012, 15:48
Yeah I will never work on Christmas, just too depressing.

I highly recommend taking this chance to do awesome things for yourself that you've always wanted to, not just Japan related stuff. Being in Jerpan is a good chance to work on you and towards your YUME. I started running, got my motorcycle license, and found loads of awesome new hobbies.

coop52
October 12th, 2012, 15:52
^This. I've learned to be a much better cook since I got here.

Hexi
October 12th, 2012, 17:33
I want to try and make connections in the costume industry over there.
:) I know they dont exactly have a bustling costume industry but still.

I could do with some new hobbies though definitely. ...... hmm.... i'm sure i'll discover something.... wish i could take my sewing machine with me.... ;__;

EDIT: The problem with me aswell is that Japan is kinda all there is to me.... (i mean apart from the costume stuff) it's been my goal and my passion for so long.... i'm going to need to re-find myself when i get there... and get back too i guess....

word
October 12th, 2012, 17:37
Your school will almost certainly have sewing machines (and other sewing/clothing construction materials, as well as a great deal of workspace) and if they're cool like my school, they'll be happy to let you use 'em.

Hexi
October 12th, 2012, 17:44
ooh yay! :) thanks! ^_^

ChasingTheSun
October 12th, 2012, 23:29
Also, super stereotypical, but I really would like to study a martial art while in Japan. I've been doing a variety of martial arts my whole life and I really want to continue in Japan.

And learn how to play a new instrument. I make that a plan whenever I'm abroad, but it never works out completely.

word
October 13th, 2012, 00:16
Did you play something when you were in HS? If you can already play something/read music, it's easy to pick up/resume/improve on a musical ability here.

Some folks near me do karate pretty regularly; I'm increasingly :| these days when it comes to martial arts, though.

ChasingTheSun
October 13th, 2012, 00:19
I played violin and viola in middle school. My dad's a drummer so he taught me the basics of that and I've tried guitar but didn't dedicate enough time to it.

Why are you increasingly :| when it comes to martial arts?

Also, if there is any opportunity to play lacrosse while in Japan, I'm all over that. I know some university's have lacrosse teams/ clubs, but is it at all popular in k-12?

flamingpriest
October 13th, 2012, 01:49
I want to see a mukade and ride a superfast train

word
October 13th, 2012, 02:12
Why are you increasingly :| when it comes to martial arts?

There seems to be something about martial arts that attracts douchebags. I first noticed this phenomenon in the US, but it is certainly not limited to any particular region. Many of the people who practice and teach martial arts seem to be unusually interested in hurting other people (or expressing, to anyone who will listen, their ability to do so), and this is not something in which I am remotely interested. For all the lip service in regards to "defense" and "self-discipline," it seems, in this particular field of study, that there is no shortage of asshats who enjoy imagining their ability to inflict pain upon others.


Also, if there is any opportunity to play lacrosse while in Japan, I'm all over that. I know some university's have lacrosse teams/ clubs, but is it at all popular in k-12?

This will vary wildly. One of my visit schools (JHS) is very much into lacrosse, while students from another school of mine had never even heard of the sport.


I want to see a mukade...

Careful what you wish for. You just might get it.

(I had a pet mukade for a little while; god forbid I should see a wild one in my house. A nearby JET was bitten by one, and my students get bitten pretty regularly. They're not all that cool; I promise.)

Hexi
October 13th, 2012, 02:46
I just had to google Mukade to make sure it's what i thought it was. eewww. centipedes are the 2nd most gross insect, next to earwigs. and now i'm going to see tonnes because i have expressed my dislike of them... o.0

ChasingTheSun
October 13th, 2012, 11:23
This will vary wildly. One of my visit schools (JHS) is very much into lacrosse, while students from another school of mine had never even heard of the sport.


I'm definitely going to end up bringing a ball with me, just because it's something I end up fiddling with when I'm bored. I wish I could bring my sticks too, but it doesn't seem worth it to bring them over. Still, hopefully I can find a club to play with a bit.

wicket
October 13th, 2012, 12:12
Chasing the sun, are you a guy or a girl? Because lacrosse is popular in certain areas of Japan, but is almost exclusively played by women.

ChasingTheSun
October 13th, 2012, 12:15
I guess I'm in luck then; I'm a woman.

wicket
October 13th, 2012, 12:15
excellent. then try and get yourself placed in the kansai area then.

ChasingTheSun
October 13th, 2012, 12:17
Awesome. I'll keep that in mind. I was hoping to be in Kansai anyway, if I could, just because that's where most of my friends live.

bwhat87
October 14th, 2012, 12:40
1) See a tanuki (they show up far too often in animes and I wanna know why darnit)
2) Find a hole-in-the-wall ramen/soba noodle stand and eat there (I do this with Mexican food in San Diego)
3) Visit Shinjuku

hunterofpeace
October 14th, 2012, 14:05
1) See a tanuki (they show up far too often in animes and I wanna know why darnit)
2) Find a hole-in-the-wall ramen/soba noodle stand and eat there (I do this with Mexican food in San Diego)
3) Visit Shinjuku

The last two will be easy seeing as food stands are everywhere and Tokyo Orientation is in Shinjuku.

A more difficult food challenge... find a place that makes really good, reasonable Western food.

mrcharisma
October 15th, 2012, 10:59
The last two will be easy seeing as food stands are everywhere and Tokyo Orientation is in Shinjuku.

A more difficult food challenge... find a place that makes really good, reasonable Western food.

I actually love the Japanese take on Western food. Royal Host and Coco's are 2 of this country's greatest achievements.

coop52
October 15th, 2012, 12:25
I like some of their versions of Western food, like hamburg steak, but I hate their idea of cheese and spaghetti sauce. Spaghetti sauce isn't supposed to be that sweet. Cheese should have some sort of flavor to it.

Teishou
October 15th, 2012, 14:44
Their spaghetti sauce makes me actually like the food. I used to hate spaghetti.

Tyr
October 15th, 2012, 15:22
A lot of the truly weird vending machines are gone; I think Japan realised it was getting a reputation. There's still beer and cigarette machines, and those that sell (bad) hot food, though.

Yeah, I've seen nothing weird despite all I'd heard in mid-2000s light documentaries.

Though what is weird is how rare food fending machines are (and how super common drinks machines are).

word
October 15th, 2012, 21:13
Though what is weird is how rare food fending machines are (and how super common drinks machines are).
word

Srsly, I am totally baffled by this. The only food vending machine within 30km of me is this hilarious ancient outdoor job in a village about fifteen minutes away. It sells tubes of potato chips. Freaking bizarre.

wicket
October 15th, 2012, 21:20
might explain why they're not a nation of fatties.
seriously, who needs to buy food from a machine?
drinks i can understand, especially in japanese summers, but surely you can wait til you get to a shop for a snack?

word
October 15th, 2012, 21:33
Oh, don't get me wrong; I rather admire Japan's emphasis on personal fitness, their intense hatred of fat people, and their inexplicable absence of food vending machines.

I'm just confused by it. If you have a f*cking zillion machines vending carbonated sugar-water, why not have a few vending crystallized sugar and chocolate, too?

Page
October 15th, 2012, 23:14
Their spaghetti sauce makes me actually like the food. I used to hate spaghetti.

You mean nasty ketchup sauce? Barf. Just can't do it. I made a batch of real sauce for a bunch of old women and it was all "karai" and "koi" complaints, never gonna win.

I wouldn't mind "western" food if it weren't for the proud people that tout it about as proof of Japan's "internationalization". That said, it (the total off the mark foreign dishes) happens in all countries so I'm just bitter.

tatsuko
October 16th, 2012, 01:38
I want to see the Kyoto Costume Museum too Hexi ^_^ But I want to see it so I have a better idea on period Japanese clothes for my SCA persona... Seriously, trying to live for days at a time in a poorly constructed and poorly colored outfit is awful >.<

I sadly don't have a list of three things... Or they are very general because I just want to do whatever I can wherever I end up, but I want to:
1) Hit up festivals whenever I can
2) Learn Japanese embroidery (if there are classes near me)
3) Buy a couple nice silks that are stupid expensive to order overseas

For my disgusting otaku three things, I am much more horrifying and otaku-y
1) Visit Otome Road/Way/Whatever way you've seen it most often
2) Increase my collection of manga (my collection that is actually in Japanese is very limited)
3) Visit some of the real locations anime take place in

Hexi
October 16th, 2012, 02:22
....SCA persona? :S I love kimono even though their construction is simple, the textile work is/can be phenomenal. im interested in museum costume restoration. :)

oh yeah speaking of silks. i want to visit the fabric district in tokyo and buy a whole tonne of fabric thats too expensive to buy here. :)

tatsuko
October 16th, 2012, 02:28
SCA is the Society for Creative Anachronism. We have our own kingdoms, baronies, shires, etc. with various titles, organizations, and things of that sort. In the SCA, you have a persona that is based upon a society before 1600 CE. My persona is Oguri Tatsuko, which makes her Japanese and the name dates to the 1500s. I have taught a class on Momiji-gari, learned kumihimo, made my own kosode, and I want to learn more about the clothing of different periods pre-Edo (though very early Edo is included in SCA period, I think). This is also why I want to learn Japanese embroidery, to improve my clothes.

Hexi
October 16th, 2012, 04:56
ooh thats cool! :) i just like pretty fabrics.... i did make a 13th century kimono in uni which was fun. but i wish i had a chance to actually make all the layers. because it had to be ok to go on stage after a quick change it only had 1 but had all the collars and bottom layers. :/
i'd totally be up for japanese embroidary too! sounds fascinating!

tatsuko
October 16th, 2012, 05:02
It's really interesting to learn all the layers and whatnot. Even more interesting that all the layers are essentially the same design, except that colors matter and you would make modifications to the lengths to make it line up right and not be crowded. All my garb is made of linen, so it's period incorrect, but cheap and easy to learn on. It'll be better when my collars sit straighter and the fabric drapes right. The embroidery stuff is beautiful. It's how they do the beautiful designs on modern kimono and obi and other things. There are a lot of teachers in UK, but pretty much none in Maine :\

tatsuko
October 16th, 2012, 05:02
It's really interesting to learn all the layers and whatnot. Even more interesting that all the layers are essentially the same design, except that colors matter and you would make modifications to the lengths to make it line up right and not be crowded. All my garb is made of linen, so it's period incorrect, but cheap and easy to learn on. It'll be better when my collars sit straighter and the fabric drapes right. The embroidery stuff is beautiful. It's how they do the beautiful designs on modern kimono and obi and other things. There are a lot of teachers in UK, but pretty much none in Maine :\

Hexi
October 16th, 2012, 05:47
really here? wow! bet there aren't any teachers around here though. but im sure there are online things. jet do encourage applicants to take up a hobby or something to do with japan and im gonna have a loooooootttt of time to waste after this application is sent off! :)

tatsuko
October 16th, 2012, 05:50
They have a list on the website... If you search for Japanese embroidery, you'll find a website for a place in Atlanta and they have a list of all the official certified teachers around the world.

Tyr
October 16th, 2012, 12:35
3) Visit some of the real locations anime take place in
Oh god I hate that stuff. I remember a few months back I was travelling somewhere (I cant remember which trip it was....Gifu or Shimane or somewhere inakay anyway) and stopped off in a tiny village.
They had this really nice old wooden station building so I went for a look inside- the entire place was decked out with pictures of characters and scenes and the like from some obscure romance anime which happened to be set there. Even the Japanese people I was with hadn't heard of it (and one was a full on fujiyoshi type) yet this rural town was really proud of itself for it. It was just....sad.



might explain why they're not a nation of fatties.
seriously, who needs to buy food from a machine?
drinks i can understand, especially in japanese summers, but surely you can wait til you get to a shop for a snack?
__________________
Im not too bothered about it, it is strange though. Back home snack machines arent that much less common than drinks machines. Theres certain places you just expect to find snack machines. But not here. Which is odd considering Japan's super vending machine reputation.

Antonath
October 16th, 2012, 12:52
Oh god I hate that stuff. I remember a few months back I was travelling somewhere (I cant remember which trip it was....Gifu or Shimane or somewhere inakay anyway) and stopped off in a tiny village.
They had this really nice old wooden station building so I went for a look inside- the entire place was decked out with pictures of characters and scenes and the like from some obscure romance anime which happened to be set there. Even the Japanese people I was with hadn't heard of it (and one was a full on fujiyoshi type) yet this rural town was really proud of itself for it. It was just....sad.
My city was used as the location for a fairly popular anime a year or two ago. Not by name, but that's about all that was changed. You can see local business billboards in the background, that sort of thing. It boosted tourism for a while, but seeing the same anime poster in literally every shop window for months was awful.


Im not too bothered about it, it is strange though. Back home snack machines arent that much less common than drinks machines. Theres certain places you just expect to find snack machines. But not here. Which is odd considering Japan's super vending machine reputation.
I'm guessing it's because the Japanese like to pretend that their food is fresh. Stuff from a vending machine clearly isn't, so it offends their "bery healthy fresh food" sensibilities.

tatsuko
October 18th, 2012, 08:08
Well, that is why I would do it as a weird otaku thing. But, I wouldn't go out of my way to do it. That is an absurd trip and a bad way to spend my money. If I were in the area, I might go see something from a show I like, but I'm not going hunting across the country.

kenright
October 22nd, 2012, 15:32
Hmm... list of top three things I want to do in Japan? That's rather difficult...

1) Find a secluded Shinto/Buddhist temple and just enjoy the atmosphere
2) Gion Matsuri again! That was so much fun when I was there...
3) Play around on the Shamisen again perhaps? I was rather entertained by it, though jesus christ the kanji was confusing initially.

wicket
October 22nd, 2012, 18:13
I'm guessing it's because the Japanese like to pretend that their food is fresh. Stuff from a vending machine clearly isn't, so it offends their "bery healthy fresh food" sensibilities.

i don't think that's it, because plenty of their high schools have vending machine with bread items in them.

Klovadkov
October 23rd, 2012, 02:03
1) Drink sake in a izakaya.
2) Watch the sunset from my house's window/balcony with a beer and a cigarette.
3) Walk around in a kimono.

Gizmotech
October 23rd, 2012, 06:19
1) Drink sake in a izakaya.
2) Watch the sunset from my house's window/balcony with a beer and a cigarette.
3) Walk around in a kimono.

Sooo... what are you gonna do after day 5?

Klovadkov
October 23rd, 2012, 07:58
Sooo... what are you gonna do after day 5?

Possibly develop a sake addiction.

Gizmotech
October 23rd, 2012, 08:29
So what are you going to do after day 6?

mrcharisma
October 23rd, 2012, 08:49
1) Drink sake in a izakaya.
2) Watch the sunset from my house's window/balcony with a beer and a cigarette.
3) Walk around in a kimono.

Based largely on his picture, would anyone else on here cross the street to avoid this guy?

coop52
October 23rd, 2012, 08:56
Not really. Looks like your standard hipster to me.

Gizmotech
October 23rd, 2012, 09:11
Based largely on his picture, would anyone else on here cross the street to avoid this guy?

He just described half the jets in my area... well except the smoking part.

kenright
October 23rd, 2012, 14:00
Based largely on his picture, would anyone else on here cross the street to avoid this guy?

It is a rather terrifying picture... baby-face, wide-rimmed lens-less glasses... Hipsterific, is what that looks like.

Cytrix
October 23rd, 2012, 14:05
He might enjoy the instagram thread. (My worst nightmare was the day I got stuck on a bus full of hipsters. Urg)

kenright
October 23rd, 2012, 14:07
He might enjoy the instagram thread. (My worst nightmare was the day I got stuck on a bus full of hipsters. Urg)

How did you not murder them all? Also, I walked into a hipster bar once. It was awful, but my friend's band was playing and I felt obligated. Fortunately, enough bourbon fixes almost everything (not, of course, the excess of people drinking PBR for $3 like its going out of style).

Cytrix
October 23rd, 2012, 14:14
They were all being nonconformist by all of them sitting down the back of the bus, so I managed to curl up at the front and avoid eye contact.

Klovadkov
October 24th, 2012, 02:51
I'm too poor to be a hipster. Unless you can get Instagram on a brick Nokia.

LittleBlueDragonfly
October 24th, 2012, 05:59
There is such a thing as a hipster bar?


My top 3:
1) Take a bunch of pictures of something awesome (not with instagram?)
2) Try some new foods
3) Visit a hot spring

kenright
October 24th, 2012, 06:26
There is such a thing as a hipster bar?


My top 3:
1) Take a bunch of pictures of something awesome (not with instagram?)
2) Try some new foods
3) Visit a hot spring

Yeah, basically imagine a bar filled with flannel, tight pants, and overpriced PBR. I asked for a bourbon and the bartender just looked at me like I was an asshole.

As for pictures, make sure to bring an awesome camera! And lots of space for pictures. When I was there for two months I took over 900 pictures, and I don't tend to take a lot of pictures when I go places.

LittleBlueDragonfly
October 24th, 2012, 07:31
I went to Japan in April, I brought like 64gb worth of memory cards. I took lots of pictures and video.... didn't quite fill it, but I wasn't there long enough to.

As for the bar, I suppose they have thought of everything now, haven't they?

jjstrand
October 24th, 2012, 08:34
1) Find the place in Japan that has the least number of horrifying giant insects, and be there.
2) Try out surfing and/or snowboarding.
3) Go in a hot spring. I heard someone talk about one with monkeys.
And probably just steal other peoples ideas.

coop52
October 24th, 2012, 08:36
Good luck with that first one.

Cytrix
October 24th, 2012, 08:45
Yeah the first one. If you find it, let all of us know so we can move there.
I had just been bragging about finding no insects in my apartment yesterday, only to come home to a huntsman in my kitchen. Couldn't find a glass big enough to cover him with. It all ended in an epic battle of orange kitchen spray and a giant bowl.

coop52
October 24th, 2012, 09:44
I've been fortunate with only getting big spiders on my balcony and the one flying cockroach in my room. I saw a mukade for the first time when I went on the walk with my students last week, and I'd probably just set the place on fire if I had an infestation of those in my house.

Gizmotech
October 24th, 2012, 09:56
Uhh... No big spiders (except those green ones, and they don't come inside... ever), no mukade, no hornets, no bugs to speak of actually.

Just a few mosquitoes in autumn and those little black flies.

Antonath
October 24th, 2012, 10:04
Coop and Giz have just informed the Japanese bug population that there are areas left unconquered. Expect an invasion.

MJN
October 24th, 2012, 10:32
No big spiders (except those green ones, and they don't come inside... ever)

So fucking thankful for this. Happen to know why, though? Anyone know the species or have a wikipedia link?

As for bugs round here, I've seen a mukade in a toilet (alive and well) which made good target pricatce, hornets from time to time in school but extremely rare. The stupid big stripy spiders I see outside, around power lines, signs and the likes, a lot, but again never inside.

It's stink/shield bug season currently, I get quite a few of them. I have to shake laundry off, they seem to like sitting in that if I put it outside.

Gizmotech
October 24th, 2012, 10:39
I dunno, but it could be part of their nature to like big places. I've never seen one trying to make a small web before, usually they're a quarter meter wide or more. They just might not like small places.

Tyr
October 24th, 2012, 11:15
Good luck with that first one.
I've never seen mukade here and giant spiders only appear if I go walking in the woods, around civilization the spiders at mine are pretty normal size.
About the only freaky thing is the very occasional mega wasp attacking the school.

Nature here is pretty tame really. The only freak out moment I had at home was a snake in the entranceway to my apartment building- but that was just a made me jump moment then I noticed it was probally a harmless one.

The one thing that is annoying here though are mosquitos. I don't get them at home and they're everywhere here. Have to have a mosquito net over the window when I open it or they invade.

Lianwen
October 24th, 2012, 11:15
SCA is the Society for Creative Anachronism. We have our own kingdoms, baronies, shires, etc. with various titles, organizations, and things of that sort. In the SCA, you have a persona that is based upon a society before 1600 CE. My persona is Oguri Tatsuko, which makes her Japanese and the name dates to the 1500s. I have taught a class on Momiji-gari, learned kumihimo, made my own kosode, and I want to learn more about the clothing of different periods pre-Edo (though very early Edo is included in SCA period, I think). This is also why I want to learn Japanese embroidery, to improve my clothes.

When I did tech support, my boss was SCA. He did some of the coolest stuff ever, and kept me in the loop on his projects. Guy was awesome. I think he tried hinting at me to join too, but I lack creative motivation that I probably wouldn`t be able to keep up with it.

I still want to do kyuudo in my area. Kinda get all sorts of excited when a town in my local area does archery on horseback. I would be all over that. But I don`t have a car so can`t make it to the training/meetings/practice.

//only complaint I have about not having a car in Japan.

Cytrix
October 24th, 2012, 11:17
I have a troop/pack/family of about 7 geckos in the outside stairwell of my apartment and they tend to eat anything that wants to come inside. The huntsman yesterday floated down from the ceiling which was really freaky to see. It just spread out its legs and fell at a really slow rate. Scared the crap out of me.

yamaimo
October 24th, 2012, 11:37
Late to the thread, but in my old town, there was a vending machine with eggs in it. About as exciting as you get in inaka.

coop52
October 24th, 2012, 13:09
I saw my first egg vending machine the other day.

Re:bugs- worst I've seen was when I rented a cabin for a weekend with some Japanese friends. I had to pee in the middle of the night and encountered some weird huge things that looked like Satan. They still hung around in the morning, and no one else seemed bothered by them.

tatsuko
October 24th, 2012, 13:12
When I did tech support, my boss was SCA. He did some of the coolest stuff ever, and kept me in the loop on his projects. Guy was awesome. I think he tried hinting at me to join too, but I lack creative motivation that I probably wouldn`t be able to keep up with it.

I still want to do kyuudo in my area. Kinda get all sorts of excited when a town in my local area does archery on horseback. I would be all over that. But I don`t have a car so can`t make it to the training/meetings/practice.

//only complaint I have about not having a car in Japan.

SCA is awesome. If you ever get a chance to hit an event, it is really worth it. It gets you to do and learn things that you may never have learned otherwise. I taught a class on momiji-gari and it actually went pretty well. When the hell would I have ever bothered to do any research into leaf viewing in Japan otherwise? When would any of the people that attended have researched it? I got to take a really cool class on the Buddhist Priests of Nothingness from Japan and that was also very cool.

jjstrand
October 24th, 2012, 17:08
From what I've been able to make out from old threads on here, prefecture location dictates what giant bugs you've gotta deal with.
Hornets and mukade I can probably deal with, but spiders floating down from my ceiling..
I'll start doing my research.
Does anyone have a house cat? I remember seeing someone mention before theirs was a mukade-hunter.. But if you're only going to be there for 1-5 years, it seems like you'd have to find it another home at the end of your term.
At least, I know taking a cat out there isn't really in the cards, but is bringing one back with you after your time on JET not such an issue?

jjstrand
October 24th, 2012, 17:09
Because maybe:

1) Get a giant, bug eating cat.

Lianwen
October 24th, 2012, 17:24
From what I've been able to make out from old threads on here, prefecture location dictates what giant bugs you've gotta deal with.
Hornets and mukade I can probably deal with, but spiders floating down from my ceiling..
I'll start doing my research.
Does anyone have a house cat? I remember seeing someone mention before theirs was a mukade-hunter.. But if you're only going to be there for 1-5 years, it seems like you'd have to find it another home at the end of your term.
At least, I know taking a cat out there isn't really in the cards, but is bringing one back with you after your time on JET not such an issue?

Foster. If your box owner allows it, I can hook you up.

Cytrix
October 24th, 2012, 17:52
I was tempted to get a cat, but then it would mean being really limited with my travel options etc. It's not like back at home where our cats run around in ze wild and forage for themselves if we aren't home for a day or two (yay for farm cats)

Shisa
October 24th, 2012, 18:32
1) Ascend Mount Fuji
2) Spend the night in a Ryokan
3) Try out some Karate

word
October 24th, 2012, 18:35
MG and I have a cat; it's been only a mild inconvenience if we have to leave him for more than a day or two. Our neighbors/students come by and take care of him if we need. Your mileage may vary, depending on how easily you make friends, how easily you trust your students in your empty house, or how much your neighbors like you.

jjstrand
October 24th, 2012, 19:20
That's good news, thanks Lianwen. I'll have to think about it when/if I get there. I've had a few cats before, but I guess it's been a lot easier to find someone to look after them if I've been away for holiday (family, long-standing neighbours, friends). I'll scope it out when the time comes.
Nice to know there's the opportunity though.

Tyr
October 24th, 2012, 22:27
I've been wanting a pet but yeah, the travel hastle is off putting. Also that I'm not gonna be a lifer. Who knows where I'll be next year.

armouredghost
October 27th, 2012, 05:02
1. study a martial art
2. Learn more about Ainu culture
3. Visit coral reefs in the south

Paper Moon
October 29th, 2012, 14:20
1) Travel around on the weekends/holidays with no plans-- just explore various parts of Japan and see what happens. Go everywhere that I can go and do everything that seems interesting (just keeping in mind that I always have to have enough money to get back again). This is one of my favourite things to do.

2) Learn a traditional Japanese art or martial art. I am interested in Kendo, Kyudo, and Noh theatre, but I am pretty open to trying anything. I guess this will partly be dictated by what is available in my area.

3) Climb Mt. Fuji-- It seems like there will be ample opportunities to do this!


Oh... and if they're still making music, I'd like to see Shonen Knife perform live! And maybe The Pillows too. My friend was an exchange student in Japan and he let me borrow his Pillows CD, they are fantastic!

MJjunkie86
October 29th, 2012, 22:10
1) Ascend Mount Fuji

I hope you intend to descend too...?

Gizmotech
October 30th, 2012, 17:40
As a dude the first thing you should do is get a hair cut in japan. Best hour of your life for like 16$. God I love hair cuts in Japan.

LittleBlueDragonfly
October 30th, 2012, 22:00
Really? Getting a haircut in Japan is something I would worry about, with the different type of hair and everything.

lilyanphino
October 30th, 2012, 22:51
I have never had a bad experience getting my hair cut in Japan and I'm a girl. Just know exactly what you want when you go in, bring a photo of what you want, and you should walk out with your hair that way. The only people I've heard complaining about their haircuts are people who either didn't know what they wanted or brought in photos that weren't the kind of hair cut they actually wanted.

Page
November 1st, 2012, 09:15
I wouldn't paint the country with that brush. I had a horrible experience at my local inaka salon despite the fact that I explained (in fine Japanese) what I did and didn't want. Walked out with unhealthy, crappy ends because the woman didn't know how to function without using a razor. And apparently to her layering = thinning.

That said, good and bad hairdressers exist in any country and maybe I just had bad luck. But you should have a clear idea of what you don't want if you have certain hair DON'TS (probably not an issue for people who don't really care that much), because there are certain differences that some hairdressers just might not know. If you're going in blind to a salon I'd recommend going with your regular cut instead of a big change and seeing how it goes. Nearby ALTs may be helpful as well!

Now I have the best hairdresser--even better than anyone I had in the states!

Here's a thread that has some haircut terminology: haircut terminology (http://forum.gaijinpot.com/showthread.php?39768-haircut-terminology)

Page
November 1st, 2012, 09:15
dp

MJN
November 1st, 2012, 14:48
As a dude the first thing you should do is get a hair cut in japan. Best hour of your life for like 16$. God I love hair cuts in Japan.

I agree with this, it's fantastic. The cutthroat razor shave feels great, the massage feels... odd, but it's still a fantastic hour.

kenright
November 1st, 2012, 14:57
The cutthroat razor shave feels great

F*ck no. I've seen Sweeney Todd, hell I've been in Sweeney Todd, I'm not putting a straight razor within ten feet of my throat. Those razors are bloodthirsty, yo.

bmpalmer
November 17th, 2012, 07:35
I would like to:

1) Meditate under a cherry blossom tree
2) Play taiko at a festival
3) Visit as many places that I can that differ from one another

^_^

seinaruyoru
November 19th, 2012, 03:55
I will preface this by saying that I have lived in Japan, but the main things I can't wait to get back are in the creature comfort category.

1) Fruit (I want kyohou, and biwa, and kaki, and all the other fruits I cannot get where I live)
2) Kotatsu, there's nothing better.
3) Ohuro I miss Japanese ohuro, I don't have a hot tub, so I can't pretend.

Wasabi
November 19th, 2012, 06:01
1. Cat Island
2. Cat Cafes
3. Aokigahara

Gizmotech
November 19th, 2012, 09:05
Cat Island is not as impressive as it once was. My friend went there last year, still more cats than people, but nowhere near as many as there used to be.

Page
November 19th, 2012, 10:25
Yeah and it's dirty. Though I have to say that suddenly being bombarded by 15 cats was an experience.

I appreciate kotatsu and Japanese baths as much as the next person but I hope you enjoy your insulation and central heating while you can, person. It takes me 30 minutes to get up now that it's cold. dum.

Wasabi
November 19th, 2012, 10:46
Also, visiting Kishi Station in Wakayama to see Tama the Cat. I wonder if they make a cat lover's guide to Japan?

EDIT: Forgot to mention, both Sanrio/Hello Kitty theme parks. Also, Shinjuku. My boyfriend wants to see the 1:1 scale Gundam. Urgh... I think I want to see it all. Except for the monkeys in the hot springs - they creep me out.

flamingpriest
November 20th, 2012, 08:17
Isn't there some sort of bunny island too?

coop52
November 20th, 2012, 08:36
Yep. It was once some sort of weapons facility, and the test bunnies escaped and became fruitful and multiplied.

Hexi
November 20th, 2012, 08:43
yep. i want to go there. although i'll regret it with hives and an almighty asthma attack. but i don't care. XD

stanmarsh
November 21st, 2012, 02:57
OK, besides the standard frolicking through Tokyo and learning Japanese

1. Become a Kit Kat connoisseur...I have a somewhat out-of-control sweet tooth and would be pathetically excited to try all the flavors.

2. Learn to surf

3. Climb Mt. Fuji. And the Japanese Alps.

Eternal Melody
November 26th, 2012, 03:05
1. Visit the Kayabukiya Tavern (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AzuhbA-syCE)in Utsonomiya where Monkeys are waiters.
(I love Macaque Monkeys!)

2. Fushimi Inari Temple.

3. Hike up Yakushima.

Shisa
November 29th, 2012, 00:54
I hope you intend to descend too...?

Don't be silly! I plan to stay atop and become frozen so I can enter a century-long cryogenic sleep. You'll then read about my experience in a book called 'Alternatives to Acquiring Japanese Citizenship' in 102 years time.

Eternal Melody
December 2nd, 2012, 02:36
Don't be silly! I plan to stay atop and become frozen so I can enter a century-long cryogenic sleep. You'll then read about my experience in a book called 'Alternatives to Acquiring Japanese Citizenship' in 102 years time.


That is a great idea, haha.

Shisa
December 2nd, 2012, 19:51
That is a great idea, haha.

We'll soon find out. ;)

Btw, I think hiking up Yakushima sounds like a lot of fun. From what I've seen, in pictures, and read about it it's definitely something I'd do. Looks beautiful.

SPR_255
December 3rd, 2012, 01:00
1. Mountain hiking in search of old shrines and whatever else is out there. Japan has some beautiful wilderness. This includes climbing Mt. Fuji as well.

2. Visit the Fushimi-Inari Taisha shrine and explore Kyoto.

3. Experience an authentic Japanese festival (and the foods that go with them). The Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens down here in Delray Beach has three Japanese festivals every year (Oshogatsu, Hatsume, and Obon) which are all pretty fun, so I expect a good time.

Eternal Melody
December 3rd, 2012, 03:42
Don't be silly! I plan to stay atop and become frozen so I can enter a century-long cryogenic sleep. You'll then read about my experience in a book called 'Alternatives to Acquiring Japanese Citizenship' in 102 years time.


According to this (http://www.debito.org/naturalization.html) (which referenced the Daily Yomiuri), you only need to live in Japan consecutively at one address for 5 years. Not sure if Mt. Fuji would count as an actual address though. Maybe your idea is worth a shot. But, it sounds like you would have to renounce citizenship of your homeland.

Eternal Melody
December 3rd, 2012, 03:44
Btw, I think hiking up Yakushima sounds like a lot of fun. From what I've seen, in pictures, and read about it it's definitely something I'd do. Looks beautiful.

To be surrounded by something that is up to 3,000 years old is mind boggling. :)

Eevee
December 3rd, 2012, 17:12
1) Exploring wherever I get placed, as well as everywhere else I can manage to get to. Of particular interest to visit: Okinawa, Osaka and Hokkaido (in winter!).

2) Trying all of the new foods I can lay my hands on.

3) Japanese baths.

MJjunkie86
December 5th, 2012, 03:57
Don't be silly! I plan to stay atop and become frozen so I can enter a century-long cryogenic sleep. You'll then read about my experience in a book called 'Alternatives to Acquiring Japanese Citizenship' in 102 years time.

Ah see! Good job I asked, can you put me down for a preorder of your book, please. Make it out to my Great Grandchildren, if you don't mind!

electrofreeze
December 17th, 2012, 21:00
This part of the forum seems kind of dead right now, probably because we're all working on our applications. However, I thought I'd start a discussion filled with optimism!

If/When you are accepted to JET, what are the top three new things you want to try when in Japan, that aren't directly related to being an awesome teacher?


My main list isn't really specific to Japan, but I'm using the time there as a catalyst to achieve these goals:

1. Finally be able to put away some real money in savings. This recession has made it very hard to do that so far...
2. Get in good shape, via tons of exercise and a healthier Japanese diet.
3. Really get my Japanese ability back to its old college-era semi-fluent state, and get a lot better than that! Also, going to try to not be functionally-illiterate in kanji.

More specific things:
1. Sing tons of karaoke
2. Get a sweet bike and circumnavigate Nagasaki
3. Try not to die from the humid summer heat.

Eternal Melody
December 19th, 2012, 04:13
My main list isn't really specific to Japan, but I'm using the time there as a catalyst to achieve these goals:


2. Get in good shape, via tons of exercise and a healthier Japanese diet.


You should be able to achieve that no problem with all the walking up and down through the train stations. ;)

Ini
December 19th, 2012, 09:38
the key to a good japan experience is

1. do a little dance

2. make a little love

3. get down tonight

electrofreeze
December 21st, 2012, 02:12
You should be able to achieve that no problem with all the walking up and down through the train stations. ;)

Yup! From my experience in Japan previously, I end up walking about 3-4 times as much as in the states. It'll be nice to turn over a new leaf, and to stay there long enough that this "new leaf" becomes normal / not a phase.