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Stephanie
November 11th, 2012, 05:35
I have no idea what to bring with me! Any suggestions? I am thinking a couple of skirts, jeans and shoes but what else do I bring my own cooking utensils

mteacher80
November 11th, 2012, 09:26
Just bring your favorite things and as much money as you can. You can get most everything you will ever need in Japan - clothes, shoes, cookware, bedding, games, etc...

Antonath
November 11th, 2012, 09:29
I have no idea what to bring with me! Any suggestions? I am thinking a couple of skirts, jeans and shoes but what else do I bring my own cooking utensils
Erm... you're not moving to a third-world country. You can quite easily buy cooking utensils in any 100-yen shop, department store, or specialist retailer, depending on the quality you want.

Clothing is usually the main thing to focus on, especially if your figure / size doesn't fit within what the Japanese consider "normal", or you're posted in some tiny village with nowhere to buy clothes. A couple of outfits won't be enough, especially as you have to cope with both hot, humid summers and cold, damp winters (unless you're posted in northern-most or southern-most areas).

Entertainment is also a good thing to pack: books (kindle or other e-book reader recommended), movies, etc.

Stephanie
November 11th, 2012, 10:35
Erm... you're not moving to a third-world country. You can quite easily buy cooking utensils in any 100-yen shop, department store, or specialist retailer, depending on the quality you want.

Clothing is usually the main thing to focus on, especially if your figure / size doesn't fit within what the Japanese consider "normal", or you're posted in some tiny village with nowhere to buy clothes. A couple of outfits won't be enough, especially as you have to cope with both hot, humid summers and cold, damp winters (unless you're posted in northern-most or southern-most areas).

Entertainment is also a good thing to pack: books (kindle or other e-book reader recommended), movies, etc.


cool thanks:)

akanemukade
November 11th, 2012, 22:20
Yes, you will buy a lot of stuff here, but it's essential that you bring enough clothes with you because Japanese clothes can be hard to fit into. The weather can also be extreme here, depending on where you live, with either hot hot summers or super frigid winters, or both! So be prepared.

And then the only other things you really need are toiletries, a first aid kit is very handy (but some over the counter and prescription drugs from back home are illegal here so be careful), a laptop, a reading tablet, bringing an ample supply of make up is a good idea, personal mementos, pictures of family... that's all I can really think of.

I wound up bringing too much with me, so don't obsess over it. One big bag of luggage and a decent sized carry-on will do.

Konnichiwayuki
November 13th, 2012, 01:01
I've been thinking about the same thing :kaosotnplaugh3:. What has been suggested so far seems right on target. I'm a book lover so...no kindle/tablet for me. Definitely want to bring some DVD's, thought about bringing a gaming console but I am not sure about that :kaos_mamies_hiku:. I haven't looked into the electric situation yet, so I don't know if I'll be needing a converter (s) or not:kaos_kms_m-u-n:. I've heard to definitely bring your own toothpaste and deodorant.

Laevatienn
November 13th, 2012, 02:37
US and Japanese plugs are pretty close so you generally don't need a converter. Just note that for the most part you are limited to non-polarized plugs. Most electronics in the US use 120 volts whereas in Japan they use 100 volts. Your power adapter/block on your device should have a range of tolerable input values. For pictures and a quick guide see below. Just check any power blocks you have to see if they'll work. Note, you can use an electronic that requires more power with the Japanese plugs but the output goes down. Main example would be hair dryers and irons. Anywho, the link explains it better than I can.

Electricity in Japan | JAPAN DELUXE TOUR (http://www.japandeluxetour.com/app/html/default.php?mainpage=electricity)

@Konnichiwayuki
Game consoles... if it's a PS3 then sure (the massive beast it is) but the Wii and Xbox have region locking and it's harder to find USA or PAL coded games in Japan. You can but generally don't expect it. Handhelds hold a bit better. All handhelds besides the 3DS are region free. There are plenty of used game shops filled to the brim with great gems if you care to look. International versions of games will have English as an option if you can't read Japanese. DVD's are region locked, you'll need a special DVD player or bring your own (consoles besides the Wii can play DVD's but are also DVD region locked). Ah, region locking, my hated companion. I'm an avid gamer so I need my games. I suggest not bringing a console. Handhelds are good. Consoles take a lot of space and are heavy. My two yen.

stephiiStephii
November 13th, 2012, 02:58
...I'm a book lover so...no kindle/tablet for me..

yay another book lover!! no kindle for me either, paper all the way!!

Stephanie
November 13th, 2012, 03:14
yay another book lover!! no kindle for me either, paper all the way!!

i love paper books better. but i may just end up using electronic books

akanemukade
November 13th, 2012, 07:17
I still don't have a kindle yet either, I would love to get one though, because my books were so heavy and I'm not exaggerating when I say that I brought a mini library with me LOL

Thamsuong
November 13th, 2012, 08:17
If this is the packing thread, I think I'm in the right place? If not just let me know haha.

Hey! ok so the seminar went well!...or at least I think it did haha. So here's hoping. That said, need some advice from the lady front out there.
I'm around 5'8", and wear a us 2, but while I have no bum (think athletic body type), I do have some figure on top. I've heard a few things which I'm worried about...
Is it true that any bra size over 34A is hard to find? Also, I hate padded bras, and I keep hearing that almost all bras in Japan are padded. I don't want to be hoarding bras and bringing them over if I can possibly buy them over there.
I think I should be ok in maybe a ...medium japanese size? The only issue is that I was debating whether or not to buy my pants over here since the whole 5'8" issue makes me look comical when normal pants fit like pedal pushers.
Also, my regular wardrobe consists of bootleg or boyfriend jeans, black tank top, and flats. I've heard that while mini skirts are ok, anything showing any semblance of cleavage is just a big no. Can anyone confirm this? I'm not talking about 'all out on display', more a nice v-neck worn on a casual day. I don't really do skirts haha.
Oh! and has anyone had trouble with makeup staying on in the extremely humid Japanese summers? I'm thinking of maybe doing the perma-straight thing when I get to Japan to keep the hair under control, but I'm wondering if I should even try to bring my makeup stuff if it's just going to slide off...
I guess I'm wondering because anything I can cut out I will haha

stephiiStephii
November 13th, 2012, 08:51
LOL so happy to have book ppl here :) I'll try not to pack my bookshelf x.x

Tham there's a hair and makeup rants thread in the general section so if you use the search option I think. You'll be able to find what you wanto know, although generally your research sounds on point. I know I'll have to buy stuff online a lot cus at size 12/14 I'm sure shopping in stores will be a pain. Packing-wise I'm gonna bring work stuff and whatever I'll need for the season

Haha thought I'd share something funny and kind of related. My mom just walked into my room and gave me a pack of stuff - 2 toothbrushes and 3 bars of soap for the move lolol I'm so gonna miss her

Stephanie
November 13th, 2012, 10:25
lol you are tiny you should be fine. but I'm a size 8-10! and a size 7 shoe. I'm a 36b and i hate padded bras as well. I'm just going to buy clothes online i guess.






QUOTE=Thamsuong;799434]If this is the packing thread, I think I'm in the right place? If not just let me know haha.

Hey! ok so the seminar went well!...or at least I think it did haha. So here's hoping. That said, need some advice from the lady front out there.
I'm around 5'8", and wear a us 2, but while I have no bum (think athletic body type), I do have some figure on top. I've heard a few things which I'm worried about...
Is it true that any bra size over 34A is hard to find? Also, I hate padded bras, and I keep hearing that almost all bras in Japan are padded. I don't want to be hoarding bras and bringing them over if I can possibly buy them over there.
I think I should be ok in maybe a ...medium japanese size? The only issue is that I was debating whether or not to buy my pants over here since the whole 5'8" issue makes me look comical when normal pants fit like pedal pushers.
Also, my regular wardrobe consists of bootleg or boyfriend jeans, black tank top, and flats. I've heard that while mini skirts are ok, anything showing any semblance of cleavage is just a big no. Can anyone confirm this? I'm not talking about 'all out on display', more a nice v-neck worn on a casual day. I don't really do skirts haha.
Oh! and has anyone had trouble with makeup staying on in the extremely humid Japanese summers? I'm thinking of maybe doing the perma-straight thing when I get to Japan to keep the hair under control, but I'm wondering if I should even try to bring my makeup stuff if it's just going to slide off...
I guess I'm wondering because anything I can cut out I will haha[/QUOTE]

patjs
November 13th, 2012, 11:29
You want to bring enough clothes. More if you are a bigger person. Still don't know why so many people think they need to "pack for a year."

You don't want to bring any kind of household items like sheets or kitchen utensils or ANYTHING like that. You can get it all there. Your house will likely have a lot, and you can decide after arriving what you need to buy.

You'll want something to keep you occupied the first few weeks without internet. So, load up your computer or bring dvds. Reading material.

+1 for first aid kit stuff. You probably can't read/ won't like some of what they have at the store there. Don't want to open up this whole tireddebate, but I'd skip the gifts except for maybe something to give to people who help you out at beginning like a supervisor.

It's hot and sweaty and you want to keep luggage light. Remember to send what you don't need right away ahead too.

Page
November 13th, 2012, 11:40
Is it true that any bra size over 34A is hard to find? Also, I hate padded bras, and I keep hearing that almost all bras in Japan are padded. I don't want to be hoarding bras and bringing them over if I can possibly buy them over there.

...

whether or not to buy my pants over here since the whole 5'8" issue makes me look comical when normal pants fit like pedal pushers.

...

I've heard that while mini skirts are ok, anything showing any semblance of cleavage is just a big no. Can anyone confirm this? I'm not talking about 'all out on display', more a nice v-neck worn on a casual day.

...


Oh! and has anyone had trouble with makeup staying on in the extremely humid Japanese summers? I'm thinking of maybe doing the perma-straight thing when I get to Japan to keep the hair under control, but I'm wondering if I should even try to bring my makeup stuff if it's just going to slide off...

The sizes exist--I'm a 34/6 C and I find bras fine. They ARE padded but if you buy higher quality ones you can usually take them out. The biggest thing will be if you're used to the kind back in the US that usually vary in print and colors rather than lace and designs. There's lot of frills, ribbons, lace, pearls and stuff here. It's not completely horrible (especially if you find a nice shop) but it's different than what I was used to. But you should know that a high quality shop will start you around 4000 or so for a bra.. on up to a man!


I'm 5'8" and don't have any trouble now, but that's because I know what stores to go to. Uniqlo and ZARA are usually fine for my height. I'd bring enough for work and a pair or two for fun but I don't think you need to bring ALL your pants. If worse comes to worse someone can send you your stuff but there's definitely ways to get your size over here. (Just maybe not at your local AEON, though I've had luck there too.)

Cleavage is pretty much a no-no. I pranced around and did it anyway because "I am gaikoku" but you'll get self-conscious anyway with all the people staring (hello children who aren't used to this). You'll get passive-aggressive comments about being cold and the lady teachers may think you're a slut bag. That said, it doesn't mean your wardrobe is trash. Just invest in high-rising undershirts. They sell tons here!

I've never had any problems in the humidity for makeup, you should be fine. My hair isn't completely crazy (but I grew up on a peninsula) but you might want to bring a straightener and grooming creme with you to keep the flys away. Or learn how to do fancy updos/braids--that's pretty much all I did in the summer so I wouldn't have to deal with it.





As for packing for Japan, like other people said Japan is not a third-world country. The basics should be clothes, undergarments, and any toiletries you can't leave behind. Plus shoes and winter jackets. I actually shipped my box of toiletries (face wash, toothpaste, deodorant, nail polish, hair products, etc.) to myself before I left so it wouldn't take up space. Unless you have to have whatever it is, you don't really need anything else. I marked my 2 suitcases for clothes, "yoroshiku" goods from home, and immediate need toiletry stuff only. My carry-ons could be my fun stuff--books, PS3, laptop. I would definitely recommend keeping a file of all your JET paperwork and any student loans you may be paying off and bringing it with you, as well.

As for books--take your favorite or one(s) to read on the plane but, imo, if you're moving back afterwards it's kind of silly to bring a bunch of books with you. You're going to accumulate a bunch of stuff in Japan and regret bringing things like books and DVDs (imo, unless you're OK with giving them away before you go back home). I burned all of my DVDs and ended up getting a kindle after being here for a year. Not as fun as a book but easier when moving back.

Thamsuong
November 15th, 2012, 12:31
Well it's good to hear my research isn't completely off haha. It's also good to hear that I won't have to pack my life into a suitcase ^^. Also, thanks for the tip about the makeup thread - it really was helpful, and definitely answered quite a few questions I had! In fact, I think a good amount of my suitcase will end up filled to the brim with books and my 4 suits <3 lol.
Thank you guys so much again!!
Oh, and about those frilly, lacey bras being everywhere....turns out after asking a few Japanese friends it's true haha. Looks like I might be buying a few of the T-shirt variety in the states before I head out :P.

abbajen
November 25th, 2012, 14:39
If you are trying to measure in US measurements, by all means, bring measuring cups and spoons. If you measure in metric, it is not a problem. I could absolutely not find any women's shoes or clothes, even where I lived (Kyoto). However, I wear 34-36 D bras, size 9 pants, medium American shirts, and size 9 US shoes. If you are smaller, you may be okay.

Page
November 25th, 2012, 23:03
They sell US measurement stuff everywhere nowadays. I just picked up a new set of cups and tbsp at Daiso after I lost my LOFT stuff.

That may have been your experience, abbajen, but I know a lot bigger people that have no problems. Probably impossible to find stuff at most boutique style places but AEON, Uniqlo, ZARA, H&M, etc. should fit that size. Even when I was a fatty mcfat here 6 years ago (read: a lot bigger than that) I had no problems (but it took time to find places near me to shop). Though I never had the boobs (which I can only imagine is pretty much impossible to fit into most Japanese bras (if you stick to the stores above you should be OK for shirts though!).

Gizmotech
November 26th, 2012, 11:50
Uniqlo and aeon are the only reason I can wear clothes in Japan. Being a tall fatty mcphaterson clothes shopping is difficult, but once I embarrassed the 80's and the flood pants, and belly button T's life became great :)

(Seriously though, Aeon and Uniqlo are great especially if you're big).

coop52
November 26th, 2012, 12:51
Nthing the rec for Aeon and Uniqlo. I'm short enough to fit into a lot of Japanese boutique clothes as well, such as Lowry's Farm and Earth Music & Ecology; I could find stuff even when I was a fatty-boom-boom. My problem is that most clothes aren't cut with boobs and butt in mind. For tops, baggy is the in thing right now, so it's not hard to find stuff that will stretch over the boobs, but there's a lot out there that looks horrible if you're bigger than a 34B or so. Jeans either are too tight or do that stupid gappy thing in the back.

Page
November 26th, 2012, 15:24
Damn potato sack shirts!!! And gaping high-water pants. Looking like a block is only sexy if you're built like a block.

Teishou
November 26th, 2012, 16:07
If you're placed in Hokkaido, there are super large sizes available at Daiei.

Gizmotech
November 26th, 2012, 16:17
Damn potato sack shirts!!! And gaping high-water pants. Looking like a block is only sexy if you're built like a block.

I had a REALLY cute third year last year who I had never seen in anything other than her school uniform. She came in shortly after graduating and given she was into fashion and stuff I figured it'd be something pretty decent looking.

Nope. Burlap sack top, Flood pants that made her hips about twice as wide as she was. It was like looking at a brown clown w/o makeup.

Needless to say I was quite disappointed.

Antonath
November 26th, 2012, 16:31
I put it down to most of the population being old. Every clothes shop in my town caters for either businessmen or old women.

Gezora
November 26th, 2012, 16:47
Fashion for women in Japan is absolutely atrocious. And yeah most clothing shops suck in small towns because they're catering to the barely mobile baasans that live in the neighborhood. Everyone else just drives down the highway to the mall.

bwhat87
November 27th, 2012, 14:09
Oooookay, how about a dude's perspective here. I'm 6'1" 200lbs, 36" waist, large to xl shirts depending on the brand...any troubles here? I'm definitely not a giant or anything, but I'm "above average" that would be living in a "below average" world, so I'm curious.

As to the PS3, I love mine and was planning on bringing it along (assuming I get picked, of course), there shouldn't be an issue in using it over there, right? Also, just bought a 3DS, is that one good to go?

Finally, what's this about bringing your own toothpaste and deoderent? Is that just so you can stick with brands your comfortable with or do they get kinda funky over there?

Gizmotech
November 27th, 2012, 14:22
Bwhat.
I'm 6' 210 pounds. I came over at a 38" waist, now wear a 34. I wear XL shirts because I'm broad shouldered. (46 jackets fit well, but can be kind of snug on the shoulders). Pants aren't that much of a problem, but larger than 38 will be (don't gain). Shirts long enough for arms CAN (most likely will) be a problem though.

Ini
November 27th, 2012, 14:23
tshirts will be skin tight so if you plan on hanging out in gay clubs alot you should be fine, if that's not your scene you might struggle to find something that you are comfortable with. Where do you carry your 200lbs? if you have normal sized shoulders you'll struggle with shirts, if you are a little dude with a pot belly you should be ok.

bwhat87
November 27th, 2012, 14:29
I'm fairly well built, I think I have a 38 chest, been a while since I've had anything tailored. I've got the typical tight-end kinda build for you football fans. Well, good thing I have a solid stock of t-shirts, though I suppose I should start collecting button-downs/collared shirts and winter clothes. Not sure what the dress code is for teachers, but living all my life in Southern California has left me somewhat under-prepared for extended cold.

Ini
November 27th, 2012, 14:41
you should be able to find stuff that fits, just be prepared to pay a fortune for under armour stuff in sports shops while everyone else if off buying 20 Lsized tshirts for 5 dollars at uniqlo.

bwhat87
November 27th, 2012, 14:50
Dude, Costco has them right now for like $15 a 3-pack. Gonna so stock up on some long-johns and jackets while I still got some cash to blow :)

BeckyJones
November 27th, 2012, 15:32
Finally, what's this about bringing your own toothpaste and deoderent? Is that just so you can stick with brands your comfortable with or do they get kinda funky over there?
Toothpaste can be found just as easily here. The difference is the flavors, they may not be to your liking. As for the deodorant, stick deodorant and antiperspirant are hard to find that are strong enough for most gaijin. I've seen lots of body sprays here, and Axe is even here. But if you like your super power stick deodorant, Id bring it along, or have someone ship you a supply every 6 months or so.

Antonath
November 27th, 2012, 15:34
As for the toothpaste and deodorant: toothpaste you will probably be ok with. There used to be a lack of toothpaste with fluoride in Japan, but it's caught on in the last few years. Deodorant, however, you should bring plenty of. The stuff over here rarely has an antiperspirant ingredient and if it does, it's not that strong.

Gizmotech
November 27th, 2012, 15:40
tshirts will be skin tight so if you plan on hanging out in gay clubs alot you should be fine, if that's not your scene you might struggle to find something that you are comfortable with. Where do you carry your 200lbs? if you have normal sized shoulders you'll struggle with shirts, if you are a little dude with a pot belly you should be ok.

Pot belly thing is so very true. Emphasis on short though. Some of the shirts just aren't made for people w/ long torsos and shorter legs. (Basically the exact opposite of Asians with their tall legs and short torsos)


you should be able to find stuff that fits, just be prepared to pay a fortune for under armour stuff in sports shops while everyone else if off buying 20 Lsized tshirts for 5 dollars at uniqlo.

THIS. I was soo happy when the uniqlo polos just fit. Now if I was less of a fatty they'd be even better (still snug on the shoulders though... gay clubs for me)


Toothpaste can be found just as easily here. The difference is the flavors, they may not be to your liking. As for the deodorant, stick deodorant and antiperspirant are hard to find that are strong enough for most gaijin. I've seen lots of body sprays here, and Axe is even here. But if you like your super power stick deodorant, Id bring it along, or have someone ship you a supply every 6 months or so.

I stock up from home every 6 months or so on deodorant (being a sweaty fat frenchman doesn't really work in Japan sadly) and I just get them to toss in my favourite toothpaste at the same time.

akanemukade
November 27th, 2012, 17:21
.

mothy
December 2nd, 2012, 00:35
Where do you carry your 200lbs? if you have normal sized shoulders you'll struggle with shirts, .

This is so annoyingly true. Being a little guy I figured I wouldn't have any of the clothes problems I'd heard about from other westerners. But the shoulder issue. Every t-shirt is tight across the shoulders for me. I always try to buy a t-shirt or two when I'm back home. The ones here are so uncomfortable.

bwhat87
December 2nd, 2012, 09:35
Heh, great. I'm wide-shouldered by American standards as it is, gonna be damn near impossible to find a shirt that fits me then. Guess it's a good thing I have a solid collection of t-shirts. I'm assuming there's a dress-code of sorts for ALTs while teaching? Cuz I'm woefully short in the collared-shirt department.

Teishou
December 2nd, 2012, 15:02
Depends on your school. I wear suits at my JHS and HS, and track suits at my ESs.

hunterofpeace
December 2nd, 2012, 23:52
Short of jeans or revealing clothes, I wear whatever I want. I'm a woman though. My school is also awesome.

MJN
December 3rd, 2012, 11:17
As to the PS3, I love mine and was planning on bringing it along (assuming I get picked, of course), there shouldn't be an issue in using it over there, right? Also, just bought a 3DS, is that one good to go?

Finally, what's this about bringing your own toothpaste and deoderent? Is that just so you can stick with brands your comfortable with or do they get kinda funky over there?

The PS3 will be fine. Your online accout is tied to address/card, so you'll keep your US one fine. PS3s are reigon free, so you can play any game from anywhere. It's also got an internal transformer, so you can use any default wall plug/kettle lead and it'll turn it on. You're from America judging by your flag, so just take your US plug and it will be fine.

The 3DS likewise in regards to charging. It's got the transformer in the plug, so you'll need to use a 100-120v 2-pin plug. From america, you're fine. From the UK, not so much. It's region locked, so watch out - Japanese games won't work on it.

In regards to deodorant: Antiperspirant seems non-existant. I've found regular brands of deodorant(Axe/Lynx) here, but in smaller cans that are more expensive.I'd recommend, if you can fit it, a can or 2 if you're a person that stinks naturally without it, or some antiperspirant if you're a sweaty manbeast. I wouldn't recommend taking a massive collection with you, ask a friend to drop you a care package or buy some off eBay or something if you need/want it.

Toothpaste is easily available everywhere, but I've found it has a bit of a bitter taste. It doesn't bother me, though. Whitening toothpastes seem non-existent.

TAmember2003
December 8th, 2012, 12:04
talking about games, I read somewhere (on here i believe) that the international games have english subtitles...
what does this mean. really? If I buy a japanese game from china it will have english subtitles?? or does the game itself have to say international version??

Also, thanks about the DS games... I did not know that and that will be very useful!

Laevatienn
December 8th, 2012, 21:13
talking about games, I read somewhere (on here i believe) that the international games have english subtitles...
what does this mean. really? If I buy a japanese game from china it will have english subtitles?? or does the game itself have to say international version??

Also, thanks about the DS games... I did not know that and that will be very useful!

No. There are games have "International" on the title and include English subtitles and voice overs. They are called International Editions but not all games have them. Off the top of my head I know Final Fantasy 12 and Star Ocean the Last Hope have International editions. Kingdom Hearts 2 Final Mix I believe has English... You have to look for the "International" on the cover.'

In fact, you can also look at the box and it will tell you what languages the game is in. 英語 is English if you don't know kanji. Look for that if you want it in English.

zombiekelly
January 5th, 2013, 15:26
What kind of clothes are my fellow ladies going to pack? I'm one of those American fatties so I'll have to pack a bunch. I figure a jacket and few pairs of nice pants, a bag of camis and some nice shirts will last me until I get a feel for the job. Question is, what colors do you recommend? I was the only one at the Interac seminar wearing a color besides black/dark blue (mourners' colors).

TAmember2003
January 5th, 2013, 16:10
i asked my recruiter about different color shirts and he told me it depends on the school.
If everyone is wearing mourners colors then most likely you shouldnt be wearing bright colors (which is what I like).
So im gonna take a few of the boring colors and a few of the happy colors. Buy more after I figure out which is safe.

stephiiStephii
January 6th, 2013, 04:58
hey guyys, googled the colour issue and came up with this: Japanese Fashion – What to wear at work (http://fashion.3yen.com/2005-08-05/what-to-wear-at-work/)

scroll through the comments.. it's old but seems to make sense, especially a lot of the comments. i actually didn't even concern myself with colours but guess that was a bad idea. good heads up.

bwhat87
January 6th, 2013, 13:25
No black? o.O That's not bueno, as that happens to be a prominent color in my wardrobe. I wonder if they're talking about just shirts or jackets or everything? Cuz, it must be said, while I could live with no black shirts, most of my sweatshirts and jackets are black and love my black pants.

Edit: saw that it's a black tie that pushes it over the top in the comments section, whew :P

Page
January 6th, 2013, 15:58
As far as I know there are no rules against colors in Japan, I'd chalk the coloring up to it being a professional interview. Also, the article above was written by someone working for an eikaiwa--much different if you're going to work in a school (and maybe again different if you're at HS, but I don't think it can be that different). At least glad they realized that "no black" is definitely not a thing.

Of course during ceremonies (start/end of the semester, grad, etc.) more reserved colors are worn (but there's nothing wrong with a bright button up under your black suit) but there's nothing wrong with wearing bright colors--you might get comments but unless you're going to live in Japan forever (and therefore these professional clothes would only be for use in Japan) I don't see why you'd want to base your professional wear on what your school MIGHT think of you. It's definitely not a firing point--people will just be shocked by your colorfulness if anything else, then they'll get over it and never mention it again.

I work at an ES, JHS, and kindergarten and see all kinds of colors from the younger teachers (and lovely ranges of gray and black from the old people). There's so much to worry about when it comes to moving to Japan, I would worry about this the least.

zombiekelly
January 6th, 2013, 16:39
The interac pamphlet makes it sound like they're going to stalk us and kill us in our sleep if we don't have a jacket and heels every second of the day, so naturally it was a little concerning. :redface:

Gizmotech
January 6th, 2013, 21:55
The only time I have ever seen a female coworker wear black at work other than pants and or a smart jacket was when someone died. Otherwise I would say anything within the shades of brown or pastels is good.

That being said, I wouldn't worry too much. I wear a black fleece all winter with black chinos and no one says anything. In fact I've been complemented on it as it looks more professional than many of the teachers :)

Antonath
January 7th, 2013, 09:08
If you're a woman, dress like someone in their 60s and you'll fit right in with the 20-something female teachers at my schools.

DandeLion
January 25th, 2013, 10:16
decent article for things to bring
The Sushi Complex: Moving to Japan: What to bring? (http://thesushicomplex.blogspot.jp/2012/08/moving-to-japan-what-to-bring.html)

Gizmotech
January 25th, 2013, 20:42
That list really reads like a pre-departure list, which has many things that are unnecessary, or cheap enough here that there is no point to bring them.

Which is odd, as according to the blog she had been in Japan for a bit already when she wrote that.

Gezora
January 25th, 2013, 22:12
All I can say is bring deodorant and dental floss. Deodorant doesn't work here and dental floss is expensive.

Lianwen
January 25th, 2013, 22:59
Ditto-ing the deodorant comment.

I broke my stick (it was running low anyway) last Tokyo trip, and I had to buy Japanese roll on deodorant and even though it was in the dead of winter and I wasn't sweating much, I still felt gross.

Page
January 26th, 2013, 11:38
I hope that if you bring NyQuil you get picked for a random bag check.