PDA

View Full Version : Anyone else confused yet?



zombiekelly
February 16th, 2013, 18:17
Interac's pre-hire materials stress a formal business dress code. Standard "suit, tie, and wingtips". Yet the FB page and the recruiters have been saying that you can wear business causal (even sneakers) inside the schools. Which is it?

leiferikson
February 16th, 2013, 22:21
Just start out formal and go from there. Once you get a feel for your schools, you can dress accordingly. Interac only stresses a formal business dress code because they want to project a professional image.

Indoor shoes are separate from the dress code standard. You can wear whatever shoes you want. Sneakers were suggested because they are comfortable and practical, especially if you're at an elementary school.

Gizmotech
February 17th, 2013, 12:25
My coworkers wear suits w/ crocs at work.

Like mentioned, you start off spiffy and start downgrading from there.

notjim
February 18th, 2013, 08:55
My principal would have broken my thumbs if I'd shown up to my "academic" high school in anything less than a suit. At my first Elementary school I wore whatever didn't have holes in it. You'll figure it out, just make sure you don't not bring a suit for those first weeks.

Gizmotech
February 18th, 2013, 09:31
lol @ notjim. I'm at an Academic school and show up in jeans and a zip up fleece (and I'm not the only teacher who does it :P). It's different everywhere you go I guess.

Tyr
February 18th, 2013, 10:30
Its a case of expect a situation where you might have to wear a full suit every day, as some schools are like that, but more likely you can just wear suit-trousers, any sort of shoes and a shirt.


Just start out formal and go from there. Once you get a feel for your schools, you can dress accordingly. Interac only stresses a formal business dress code because they want to project a professional image.

Indoor shoes are separate from the dress code standard. You can wear whatever shoes you want. Sneakers were suggested because they are comfortable and practical, especially if you're at an elementary school.

Have to totally disagree here.
Show up on your first day with bleached blond hair and a bazillion piercings (assume you managed to get the job looking like that in the first place...) and that's what your school will expect of you from thereon, any change towards professionalism will be subtly encouraged and seen as a great move.
Show up 100% professional however and you've set yourself a very high bar that is hard to lower.

I wouldn't suggest you show up on your first day in jeans and a tee-shirt and with a massive tattoo on your face of course but if you really must then its better to start with that and have it be your default than for it to be a sudden change for the worse.

Gizmotech
February 18th, 2013, 10:32
In a strange sorta way that I don't want to encourage, Tyr kinda has a point :P

notjim
February 18th, 2013, 13:44
Yes, lowering the bar is indeed tough. At my current elementary school I wear a tie every damn day, its a nuisance and often a garrote. Just depends on where you go, my own rule is never be the worse dressed person of my gender at the office. And cover up the tattoos, they scare the little-uns (well, they scare the office lady.)

Ini
February 18th, 2013, 14:15
thats madness. go to school in suit and tie but once you arrive change into a tracksuit like everyone else.

notjim
February 18th, 2013, 14:44
I would, but no one changes into a tracksuit. Seriously weird to see someone teaching 8 year olds every day in a suit and tie, but that is how it goes.

zombiekelly
February 18th, 2013, 15:21
So let me understand this: if I show up in a skirt, I'll have to wear a skirt the rest of my contract? If so, I'm just going to save the trouble and not pack any. Suit pants will do.

Ini
February 18th, 2013, 15:24
Suit pants will do.

You're going to Japan, not the isle of lesbos.

zombiekelly
February 18th, 2013, 15:33
No sane human wants to see my thunder thighs in a skirt.

TAmember2003
February 19th, 2013, 08:58
i was also confused about this. But I guess it just varies school to school... Im glad I didnt go all out and get a whole bunch of stuff...

zombiekelly
February 19th, 2013, 09:21
I'm going to take my clothes from when I worked at a law office. I figured they'll do after I'm settled. Having trouble finding suit coats in colors other than black, though.

MJN
February 19th, 2013, 11:37
thats madness. go to school in suit and tie but once you arrive change into a tracksuit like everyone else.

Do you have the teachers that go to work in a suit and teach in a suit, but when they have time in the staffroom they change to a tracksuit to lounge about, and end up changing 4-5 times a day?

Blake Islington
February 19th, 2013, 18:03
I was just going to wear doc martens, can't go wrong.

Laevatienn
February 20th, 2013, 03:10
Well, you've stepped on a sticky bush. Technically speaking you are Interac's employee so whatever they say goes. At the same time there is room for wiggle. Like everyone else has said, it depends on your school. At the time time, I disagree with arriving to school in jeans or whatever is handy that day. Dress smartly at all times, it looks better to the school thus giving you brownie points at the office. It's not hard to wear business casual. Wearing a suit can be exhausting, I understand that. Don't wear a tracksuit. Seriously, don't. While you are going to be a teacher in the school you are still an outsider in more than one respect. Another good rule of thumb is the closer you are to Tokyo, the better you have to dress. Another good rule of thumb is to listen to the subtle messages of your principal (or not so subtle). If your principal tells you to relax then do so, stop wearing that overly hot suit jacket and tie (I'd keep the dress pants and button up shirt). If you start being asked if you are cold then put the suit jacket back on. Varies by school but don't start changing it too drastically but by little, tiny bits at a time.

Sneakers: Sneakers are indoor shoes and are required. Wear dress shoes up until you hit the school then you have to change into sneakers (that are only used for indoors) with white soles. Two reasons for this, one is the Japanese have always had a pair of indoor and outdoor shoes so one does not track gunk into the building. Two, you need white soled sneakers, it prevents black marks so the kids have something less to do doing the cleaning period. Don't assume shoes advertised as mark-less won't mark. Personal experience there, luckily I was able to remove the mark before anyone noticed.

Black suit coats are fine as a side note. It's pure black everything that's a bad idea. Black jacket + tie + shirt. Funeral clothes.

Sorry for the little rant. Maybe I'm on the straight and narrow (how did I, of all people, end up on the straight and narrow). It's best to make the school happy so you can keep your job. Be a professional, don't slack. It helps your quality of life to some degree.

Antonath
February 20th, 2013, 08:50
Sneakers: Sneakers are indoor shoes and are required. Wear dress shoes up until you hit the school then you have to change into sneakers (that are only used for indoors) with white soles. Two reasons for this, one is the Japanese have always had a pair of indoor and outdoor shoes so one does not track gunk into the building. Two, you need white soled sneakers, it prevents black marks so the kids have something less to do doing the cleaning period. Don't assume shoes advertised as mark-less won't mark. Personal experience there, luckily I was able to remove the mark before anyone noticed.

This depends on your school. At the three schools I teach at, teachers wear sneakers, dress shoes, sandles, whatever in the main school (after changing at the entrance, of course), and white-soled sneakers are only required in the gym.

lilyanphino
February 20th, 2013, 09:00
Yeah, my school only has the white sole rule for the gym. Otherwise any kind of shoe type is worn as indoor shoes.

zombiekelly
February 20th, 2013, 09:19
Do I need to buy a separate set for just the gym, or can white soled indoor shoes double?

Antonath
February 20th, 2013, 09:29
I'm not sure. I think most of my teachers have a seperate pair even if they wear white-soled sneakers normally, so as not to carry dirt from the main school into the gym (insert rant about shoes, dirt and cleaning here).

Unless you have large feet (male size 9(UK)/10(USA), or above), you can get shoes fairly easily over here anyway.

Laevatienn
February 20th, 2013, 09:41
Yeah, my school only has the white sole rule for the gym. Otherwise any kind of shoe type is worn as indoor shoes.

True. Sneakers are just cheaper and more comfortable (unless you are in the habit of buying Jordan's new lines). As long as they don't mark is the main (depends on your school flooring). I was in Tokyo so they are stricter with that sort of thing. Like I said earlier, the closer you are to Tokyo, the stricter the rules get. Funny how that works. I was told to wear nice looking sneakers and nothing else for indoor shoes. I picked a pair that matched my dark colored suit and ended up having to buy some white ones in Japan (luckily I have a US size 7/ 23 Japan size). Fun times. Fun times. Outside of Tokyo is best if you want a more relaxed enviroment, a general rule of thumb.


I'm not sure. I think most of my teachers have a seperate pair even if they wear white-soled sneakers normally, so as not to carry dirt from the main school into the gym (insert rant about shoes, dirt and cleaning here).

Unless you have large feet (male size 9(UK)/10(USA), or above), you can get shoes fairly easily over here anyway.

Indeed, an indoor pair and an outdoor pair. Technically they have quest slippers but they are usually big and harder to walk in. Never use your outdoor shoes indoors. Put them in the shoe box. Bad manners and such. Same with your apartment, just get into the habit of leaving your shoes at the entranceway where the little step is.

Antonath
February 20th, 2013, 09:52
Indeed, an indoor pair and an outdoor pair. Technically they have quest slippers but they are usually big and harder to walk in. Never use your outdoor shoes indoors. Put them in the shoe box. Bad manners and such. Same with your apartment, just get into the habit of leaving your shoes at the entranceway where the little step is.
Actually, I meant three pairs. One for getting to school (usually dress shoes), a second for the school buildings excluding the gym (anything, but often sneakers), and a third for the gym (white-soled sneakers, as discussed).

Gizmotech
February 20th, 2013, 09:55
Strictness usually had nothing to do with proximity to Tokyo but more the schools expectations. My school is kinda lax, but still high academic. The lower academic school near me is run like a prison, as is the higher academic school in town.

The schools in the next town over, half are lax, half are super strict.

Either way, I've been wearing a pair of Echo dress shoes since I got here which I find very comfortable (I hate the squishyness of sneakers).

MJN
February 20th, 2013, 10:04
I've got one super-strict sevearly under-performing school, yet the lax ones perform better. Nothing close to being considered 'academic' considering the average test score is a fail.

Tyr
February 20th, 2013, 14:52
Unless you're good at basketball/volleyball/badminton/whatever else they do in the gym and plan on getting heavily involved with that club you don't really need an extra pair of shoes for the gym. You can just use visitor slippers for the handfull of times per year you have to go to an assembly there.

As for closer to Tokyo stricter the rules- no way.
I've seen students in Tokyo who really look pretty shabby. A fair number with brown hair even. Then there's a super inaka HS in my ken that my friend works at, they're mega strict with their uniform stuff. 100% school by school. Tokyo probally has the best but it also probally has the worst (well....excluding Saitama. The Essex of Japan).

MJN
February 20th, 2013, 14:58
Yes, but where is the Glasgow of Japan? What city has the highest knife crime, teenage pregnancy, drug abuse rates and unemployment in Japan?

zombiekelly
February 20th, 2013, 15:03
Aren't most of the girl's sports clubs outdoors, anyway?

Gizmotech
February 20th, 2013, 15:23
Uhh, during assembly you don't need to change shoes. (At least we don't at my school)

All the students are in their indoor runners, teachers just do whatever.

Tyr
February 21st, 2013, 08:47
Uhh, during assembly you don't need to change shoes. (At least we don't at my school)

All the students are in their indoor runners, teachers just do whatever.
You do at mine. The only exceptions are for big special events where the parents come in and they put a cover on the floor.


Yes, but where is the Glasgow of Japan? What city has the highest knife crime, teenage pregnancy, drug abuse rates and unemployment in Japan?

Osaka?
They even talk funny too.

Or Kita-Kyushu? Its like Fukuoka/Edinburgh's grimmer, seedier, brother.

Laevatienn
February 22nd, 2013, 02:17
Unless you're good at basketball/volleyball/badminton/whatever else they do in the gym and plan on getting heavily involved with that club you don't really need an extra pair of shoes for the gym. You can just use visitor slippers for the handfull of times per year you have to go to an assembly there.

As for closer to Tokyo stricter the rules- no way.
I've seen students in Tokyo who really look pretty shabby. A fair number with brown hair even. Then there's a super inaka HS in my ken that my friend works at, they're mega strict with their uniform stuff. 100% school by school. Tokyo probally has the best but it also probally has the worst (well....excluding Saitama. The Essex of Japan).

I say rule of thumb for a reason. When I worked in to the office that's what we observed. Rule of thumb means it's generally true, not it's always true. And when I say strict I mean the dress code more than how the kids and teachers work. A comparison of the schools south of Tokyo showed they were more likely to be lax about what ALTs wear versus the Tokyo schools. Again, rule of thumb, not scientific fact. Singular examples can be taken from any part of the gambit, doesn't change the average.