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jwkelley
September 2nd, 2013, 12:26
So what is the best and worst thing you have tried for Japanese study?

Best:Graded readers. These really helped me solidify a lot of things.

Worst: I stopped using an SRS because i got sick of flashcards.

Jiggit
September 2nd, 2013, 12:45
Best: Reading kids books.

Worst: Trying to find Japanese music to listen to, it's truly unbelievable how terrible almost all of it is.

Gizmotech
September 2nd, 2013, 14:58
Best: Going out to bars and having random conversations with people

Worst: Having Japanese people teach me useful things at said bars after I've had a few to drink....

zombiekelly
September 2nd, 2013, 20:34
Worst believe it or not was my 001 and 002 classes in college. The teacher was crap, no wonder PSU wouldn't renew her green card.

Best is probably buying comics that haven't been translated, since I have to do it myself. I can't remember what someone just said to me but I can if I read it.

jmejia019
November 14th, 2013, 08:11
sorry to necro this thread but I thought it was rather interesting.

Best: telling the exchange students I studied with in college to completely avoid english, but instead speak to me like I was a 5 year old.

Worst: trying to read material well beyond my abilities, looking up every other word.

MinisterDM
November 15th, 2013, 12:00
Best: A program called Read the Kanji (free or paid website) really helped me learned the kana and I am getting a paid membership to prepare for the JLPT.

Worst: watching anything dubbed in Japanese (western, Japanese, foreign, or otherwise) unless its a movie you have seen 100+ times...

tobenaitori
November 15th, 2013, 18:33
Worst: self study
Best: reading light novels; they're harder than comics but easier (and usually more interesting) than actual literature

Ini
November 15th, 2013, 23:38
Best: blagging a job which requires a Japanese level way above what you can do.

Worst: consuming pop culture, whatever you pick up on tv won't help you in a professional setting.

Page
November 16th, 2013, 15:47
best: tricking a j-person with no english ability/interest into marrying me
worst: tricking a j-person with no english ability/interest into marrying me

therealwindycity
November 16th, 2013, 16:19
best: tricking a j-person with no english ability/interest into marrying me
worst: tricking a j-person with no english ability/interest into marrying me

Haha this.

jwkelley
November 16th, 2013, 16:33
My friend asked his wife to start correcting him more, she told him she was too use to the way he speaks to correct him.

jmejia019
November 17th, 2013, 08:44
best: tricking a j-person with no english ability/interest into marrying me
worst: tricking a j-person with no english ability/interest into marrying me

^^haha....seriously on the floor..

Corvus
November 19th, 2013, 10:00
That isn't the first time I've heard that one.

Having a few friends with JP spouses, it can go either way. Personally, I would want someone who doesn't find my Japanrish an amusing idiosyncrasy :|

Top 3 Best
3: Writing things in Japanese without thinking about it in English first. (Really hard at first, but easy to adjust to)
2: Making Japanese friends that have no desire/have such poor English that they only talk to you in Japanese.
1: Taking the shuuden because people are definitely more talkative, and i think we know why :lol:

Top 3 Worst
3: Sticking to my textbooks - worst way to learn in my opinion and fastest way to forget what little I did learn.
2: MMOs in Japanese - they create the worst habits if you start out early on learning to speak this way. I'd go as far as to say an ALT would get a more sophisticated conversation from the primary school kids.
1: Making Japanese friends that really want to learn English. Its great if you want friends and want to learn to rely on them, but it'll bite you in the end if you want to become independent and improve your own Japanese.

CrouchingMouse
November 20th, 2013, 04:14
Best: Reading stuff in Japanese that I'm already interested in (manga, video games, etc.), looking up words and grammar I don't know, and plugging them into my flashcard deck. It's certainly helped my literacy, though obviously doesn't do much for speaking/listening ability

Worst: Trying to learn with textbooks. They're all pretty terrible and I've only ever learned anything from them after having a teacher give me a better explanation for what was in the book.

genkispirit
December 15th, 2013, 09:15
Best: Taking Japanese in university, and getting a Japanese study partner.

Worst: Taking Japanese in university, and studying with a classmate. It's like the blind leading the blind.