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View Full Version : Soooo.....how was everyone's interview??



jmejia019
February 22nd, 2014, 05:03
I realize that for some (myself included) the wounds of the interview may be too fresh to discuss at the moment, but I know many (again, myself included) are dying to hear other people's experiences. By now all US interviews should be over so lets discuss!!

unfortunately I don't feel too confident about my interview. I had the misfortune of catching a cold a few days before my interview and it really killed me. I didn't take any cold meds the night before for fear of have a late groggy morning and as a result I couldn't sleep (plus there were some...."defects" with my hotel room...). At any rate, I was pretty tired, but my interview was at 11 so I shaped up. What really killed me was my cold. I ended up taking some meds so I could avoid sniffling and such during the interview. It fogged my head up a little and I also had a slight fever so I'm sure I appeared very nervous (between the nerves, blazer and 100.7 fever I was flushed and sweating some). Plus my throat was sore and my voice suffered. I felt like all of my answers were good but my delivery was lacking. I was not as sharp as I wanted to be and couldn't quite get to the words I wanted at some points. I also completely bombed one question. They have me a brief Japanese assessment, and praised my proficiency but as we all know, that is far less important than the rest of the interview.

All in all if I had to rate my performance I would give it an 80/100. I just feel like I isn't put off the presence I needed to, even if my answers were solid.

CrouchingMouse
February 22nd, 2014, 05:18
I came out of mine feeling like I did the best I could've done and that I handled myself relatively well. Of course, since then I've been replaying all the most awkward moments over again in my head and I'm not sure what to think anymore. I kinda wish I could go into hibernation or cryogenic sleep or something until April so I don't have to keep thinking about it. I've been stressed about the whole process since the night I mailed my application. xp

Shelia
February 22nd, 2014, 05:46
Personally I felt that mine went well. My panel of 3 was composed of an ex-JET dude (who I'm now convinced is the president of my local JETAA) and 2 Japanese ladies (one older and one younger). The ex-JET pretty much asked most of the questions but there was a Japanese section where the older Japanese lady took charge.

I managed to get a few good laughs from them especially during the Japanese section where they gave me pictorials and asked me to provide the conversation. I had a lot of fun doing so and they commented on how I brought the conversations to life. There were also 4 or 5 simple Q&As in Japanese ranging from what did you have for dinner last night to if you had to choose from a newly renovated mansion or an old but characteristic apartment which would you live in. At the end I was given an opportunity to ask them questions during which I again made them laugh by asking for tips on how to make the next 2 months go quicker, but I also had a couple of more serious questions lined up, which turned into a discussion on JET experiences / lifestyle which I feel is a good sign, and they recommended me to take the Advanced Japanese course offered by JET should I be accepted.

The other questions I got asked were very much based on what was in my application / SOP and there weren't really any curveballs so I won't go into further detail, but I did head straight to a bar after my interview and wrote down my questions over a nice cocktail.

spman2099
February 22nd, 2014, 05:47
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNUr__-VZeQ

Actually, I don't think it went that badly. However, we won't know how things went until we hear back in two months. The "Interview Questions and Advice 2014" thread has pretty much turned into a conversation about how the interviews went. If you are interested, check out the last five pages or so. There are tons of accounts.



I managed to get a few good laughs from them especially during the Japanese section where they gave me pictorials and asked me to provide the conversation. I had a lot of fun doing so and they commented on how I brought the conversations to life.

I wonder if I was too straight laced in my interview... I was very professional, composed, and measured. Which means that I was able to speak relatively articulately, but it really diminished any sense of personality. I mean, it is a great method for interviewing for security jobs, but maybe it is less appropriate for this type of interview. Well, nothing I can do about it now. However, it will be something to think about if I don't get the job.

Shelia
February 22nd, 2014, 06:07
I wonder if I was too straight laced in my interview... I was very professional, composed, and measured. Which means that I was able to speak relatively articulately, but it really diminished any sense of personality. I mean, it is a great method for interviewing for security jobs, but maybe it is less appropriate for this type of interview. Well, nothing I can do about it now. However, it will be something to think about if I don't get the job.


I think it just depends on your panel, the atmosphere in mine was relaxed and casual, the interview itself was conducted in a small meeting room with lounges and a coffee table with water provided, and the flow of the interview was far more conversational than rigid so to me that called for a natural approach whilst being professional and articulate in my answers. If I walked into a room with 3 people staring me down across a table I would be straight laced too!

CrouchingMouse
February 22nd, 2014, 06:16
Mine felt like a bit of both. I was sitting on a chair halfway across the room from the interviewers, who were behind a long table. I had to keep leaning forward so I could hear them properly. But they were all pretty friendly and asked me a few questions to break the ice before getting into the harder stuff, and it felt semi-conversational at times, which helped me relax.

undisputed2020
February 22nd, 2014, 11:00
Just by the responses of many of you, I really doubt I'm going to Japan this year. The whole discussion I had about promoting diversity took a big turn that pretty much destroyed any of my credibility. That happened pretty early in the interview, but I also felt I was too casual and unprofessional for an interview. I made the interviewers laugh a bit, but I don't think it helps me much. My only good points came from my passion for teaching I suppose.

Jurassyk
February 22nd, 2014, 11:10
The last words I heard as I was walking out of the interview room were a, "Well he was...!" I could hear the tangible exclamation mark in the sentence, but the last word(s) were shut out.

At first it sounded like an enthusiastic recommendation, as in, "Well he was... Interesting! Fun!" However, the dreaded self doubt set in merely a few hours later and I know I'll fall to sleep tonight to the imagined scene of my three interviewers shutting the door and laughing about what an awful candidate I had proven to be.

All in all I'm glad it's over. I messed up a bit, but I also made my panel laugh and I certainly held nothing back. If I get in, it's because they liked me flaws and all and I'll be happy. If not I'll know that it may not have been meant to be (at this point in time) and I will look to something else with the knowledge that I at least didn't let an opportunity go by without chasing it as far as my legs could take me.

Thanks to everyone on the forums for keeping the rest of us up to date with your adventures, and let's hope this isn't where any of them end!

jmejia019
February 22nd, 2014, 13:45
Yea one thing I really regret is lack of specificity. In my current job, there are so many legal pressures when corresponding with clients that I am so used to giving vangue, pc, abstract answers. I think that really came through on a few questions in the interview and looking back I know I should have given actual examples.

firemarth
February 22nd, 2014, 15:13
I'm actually fairly confident in my interview. Of course I've read the horror stories of how hard the interview is, but I've had much more difficult job interviews in the past.

Strange thing in mine was that they didn't ask if I had any questions at the end. While waiting in the lobby with the other interviewees, the former JET talking to us said that they weren't bothering taking questions during the interviews...but it felt so off for me that I ended up forcing a question through them anyways. I think it turned out to be a good idea, as it ended up sparking discussion amongst my interviewers.

The interviewers also seemed genuinely surprised when I told them that I intended to stay on the program for the maximum amount of time I'm able to. The question I asked pertained to that, so hopefully it showed that I wasn't just saying "I'll stay on for as long as you like!" just to sound good.

yukito
February 22nd, 2014, 20:00
I was given a chance to ask questions after one of the interviewers said the interview portion was over. Afterwards though, right before leaving one of the other interviewers mentioned "oh, before I forget," with another question for me about a hypothetical teaching situation.

I'm divided between "Great, they enjoyed my company enough to want to know more," and "Dammit, they probably rejected me and cut the interview short, and he was probably being polite."

I'm certainly overthinking it, but it's the #1 thing stuck in my head. This is gonna haunt me to April. :(

moonbeam
February 22nd, 2014, 21:15
My interview seemed to go all right. My panel was made up of two JET alums and a Japanese lady and they were all very friendly. I made them laugh a few times and they seemed to like my questions at the end. The time flew by, it felt like five minutes rather than twenty. But of course later that day the doubt starting creeping in so I guess we'll see in April.

spman2099
February 23rd, 2014, 01:00
All in all if I had to rate my performance I would give it an 80/100. I just feel like I isn't put off the presence I needed to, even if my answers were solid.

In my university if you can swing an 80, you have earned yourself an A. Having an 80 average when you graduate will be enough to graduate with distinction. So, congratulations.

HorseFeathers
February 23rd, 2014, 02:25
So I felt like I did the best I could during the interview. There were things I wish I had said but without knowing the questions, I came up with the best responses I could at the time. That being said, if it went poorly or well, depends entirely on how they took my answers. Which I couldn't quite tell if the answers were well received or not. They smiled and nodded but that could have just been the panel being polite.

I did not have a mock lesson. I heard somewhere if you have teaching experience they sometimes skip that part of the interview. Which kinda bummed me out after the fact. At the time I felt lucky but later I thought that my mock lesson could have helped prove all the points I was making about my teaching ability. Ooooor I could have royally flubbed it up.

And I was asked if I had questions at the end of the interview. I thought it was important that I provide some questions but for some reason I completely blanked on the questions I had prepared. So I asked some simple questions about the orientation process and how the contract renewal works until I could think of one of those prepared questions. I asked three questions and the last one I asked dealt specifically with a video I watched on their website. I could tell the other two weren't paying attention to the first two questions but with my last question, they perked up and started writing again. And the Claire Rep said "Oh! That's an excellent question." I hope that got me bonus points then. :)

jmejia019
February 23rd, 2014, 02:58
In my university if you can swing an 80, you have earned yourself an A. Having an 80 average when you graduate will be enough to graduate with distinction. So, congratulations.

I hope that's the case. I just keep thinking how even if my interview was an 80, we all know that there are far less slots than applicants so 80 might still be too low.

Anyone know a roundabout proportion of how many interviewees get in? 1 in 3? Probably heavily dependent on the location too.

Coolmanio
February 23rd, 2014, 03:55
So I felt like I did the best I could during the interview. There were things I wish I had said but without knowing the questions, I came up with the best responses I could at the time. That being said, if it went poorly or well, depends entirely on how they took my answers. Which I couldn't quite tell if the answers were well received or not. They smiled and nodded but that could have just been the panel being polite.

I was complimented on my experience at the start of the interview. The rep from Claire made an offhand comment that I certainly have more experience than usually seen which I'm not sure if that's good because they liked that or bad because they are wondering why I chose JET now.

I did not have a mock lesson. I heard somewhere if you have teaching experience they sometimes skip that part of the interview. Which kinda bummed me out after the fact. At the time I felt lucky but later I thought that my mock lesson could have helped prove all the points I was making about my teaching ability. Ooooor I could have royally flubbed it up.

And I was asked if I had questions at the end of the interview. I thought it was important that I provide some questions but for some reason I completely blanked on the questions I had prepared. So I asked some simple questions about the orientation process and how the contract renewal works until I could think of one of those prepared questions. I asked three questions and the last one I asked dealt specifically with a video I watched on their website. I could tell the other two weren't paying attention to the first two questions but with my last question, they perked up and started writing again. And the Claire Rep said "Oh! That's an excellent question." I hope that got me bonus points then. :)

That would make sense. I did not have a mock lesson, but they went on and on and on about my previous student teaching experience!!

HorseFeathers
February 23rd, 2014, 04:02
Anyone know a roundabout proportion of how many interviewees get in? 1 in 3? Probably heavily dependent on the location too.

Someone at my location asked that question. They said something along the lines of 1 in 9. Some years it's 1 in 6. And as for dependent on location, they said it could be as few as 8 or as high as 900 getting in through where I was interviewing at.

spman2099
February 23rd, 2014, 04:13
Anyone know a roundabout proportion of how many interviewees get in? 1 in 3? Probably heavily dependent on the location too.

I have a rough idea for Toronto, I think...

So, there were four applicants at my location when I interviewed. My interview was scheduled to be twenty minutes long. Thus, if this was all standard, there would be twelve interviews every hour. So, if they were all working a straight eight hour day without lunch, they will have interviewed ninety six people a day. We know that they interview for three days, so the overall total would be two hundred and eighty eight interviews. This sounds about right, as I have heard that Toronto does about three hundred interviews. Now, my understanding is that Toronto gets about seventy positions. If all the above holds true, and some of it may not, that means that one in four get hired. That, however, should be a relatively high estimate. Surely some people didn't show up, it is likely that there is a lunch break, and it isn't guaranteed that all three days are eight hour days.

If anyone else interviewed at Toronto, and has some conflicting data (or supporting data), I would love to hear it. Better yet, if you were involved in the hiring process at some point you could give us even more insight.

nostos
February 23rd, 2014, 05:09
I was in Toronto on the last day, at the last time slot (3:15 - judging by the fact that the registration room was dark and empty when I left). My interview was supposed to be about 20 minutes; ran for more like 30. There were 2 or 3 other people interviewing at that time. I was surprised how empty it was! Oh, and my interview room was empty when I got there. Not sure if that's standard (maybe they schedule more time for interviews, but only use 20 mins) or if it was just because I was the last of the day and things were slow.

Somewhat unrelated - did anyone else have an interview panel of only 2 people? Mine was just 2 Japanese guys. Kind of threw me off. I also wasn't given the chance to ask questions at the end, which is making me nervous. I didn't even realize at the time, I was probably too shell-shocked haha.

pahandav
February 23rd, 2014, 06:26
I'd say I didn't do too badly, even though I did botch some of the Japanese stuff (but nailed some of it too.) I did tend to be rather vague and evasive with some of my answers, essentially talking for a minute or two without actually properly answering the question (one of the benefits or drawbacks of a legal education, I suppose.) And I wouldn't worry too much about your chances at getting in based on the location you interviewed at. I'm assuming they short list the top people from your country and alternate some more people who have lower scores, and the remainder get declined. So, with the US, it'll likely be 800-900 short listed out of ~1800, and then there would another 300-400 alternates. If they didn't do it that way, then people would be interviewing at consulates based on the percentages of people who were getting accepted from those consulates, rather than based on which consulate was the most convenient for them.

spman2099
February 23rd, 2014, 06:47
I was in Toronto on the last day, at the last time slot (3:15 - judging by the fact that the registration room was dark and empty when I left). My interview was supposed to be about 20 minutes; ran for more like 30. There were 2 or 3 other people interviewing at that time. I was surprised how empty it was! Oh, and my interview room was empty when I got there. Not sure if that's standard (maybe they schedule more time for interviews, but only use 20 mins) or if it was just because I was the last of the day and things were slow.

Somewhat unrelated - did anyone else have an interview panel of only 2 people? Mine was just 2 Japanese guys. Kind of threw me off. I also wasn't given the chance to ask questions at the end, which is making me nervous. I didn't even realize at the time, I was probably too shell-shocked haha.

Likewise, I had two Japanese gentlemen. Maybe for Toronto there was no former JET used in the panel this year?

Gizmotech
February 23rd, 2014, 07:16
Ummm

My year, there were 2 or 3 days of interviews at my embassy. Each day appeared to have atleast 2 or 3 panels going concurrently, with interviews scheduled every half hour. Lets go with the worse case scenario, 8*.5, 16*3, 48*3, 144. 20 people when from Ottawa.

There's "some" math for your participants. Keep in mind, afaik participants is not based out of the embassy in question but out of the country as a whole. The only time the embassy picks the follow ups is when a candidate from that embassy drops out of the program near the end, and an upgrade is required from their list of worthy candidates.

PoorYorick
February 23rd, 2014, 08:59
I haven't had my interview yet. Going to Miami tomorrow and going in Monday morning. I have zero Japanese experience. Bracing for the worst.

HorseFeathers
February 23rd, 2014, 09:04
I haven't had my interview yet. Going to Miami tomorrow and going in Monday morning. I have zero Japanese experience. Bracing for the worst.

I had no experience either. So long as you didn't say otherwise on your application, you should be fine. You'll feel a bit inferior in the waiting room talking to other applicants; but that's inevitable no matter your experience. Don't sweat it too much. Take deep breaths and smile, and you'll be fine.

Wax4Alphonse
February 23rd, 2014, 16:23
How often would a candidate have 4 people on an interview panel? I had the Japanese consul, 2 professors of Japanese/Asian studies, and the ex-JET. I thought that was unusual because the impression given about all the submitted application materials is that 3 people would review it to then interview the potential candidate. I know I did well because of the number of times the consul and professors kept nodding approvingly at my answers, even during the Japanese speaking test (I marked introductory for both speaking and listening on my application). The ex-JET did the role of bad cop, a role I could see was not that person's natural disposition, but I suppose it had to be done.

Sl10
February 23rd, 2014, 19:09
I was in Toronto on the last day, at the last time slot (3:15 - judging by the fact that the registration room was dark and empty when I left). My interview was supposed to be about 20 minutes; ran for more like 30. There were 2 or 3 other people interviewing at that time. I was surprised how empty it was! Oh, and my interview room was empty when I got there. Not sure if that's standard (maybe they schedule more time for interviews, but only use 20 mins) or if it was just because I was the last of the day and things were slow.

Somewhat unrelated - did anyone else have an interview panel of only 2 people? Mine was just 2 Japanese guys. Kind of threw me off. I also wasn't given the chance to ask questions at the end, which is making me nervous. I didn't even realize at the time, I was probably too shell-shocked haha.

I had the two guys as well. How did u find them? Seemed friendly and easy going for me but the Japanese guy was tired or really out of it. They never left room for questions for me either.

nostos
February 23rd, 2014, 21:33
I had the two guys as well. How did u find them? Seemed friendly and easy going for me but the Japanese guy was tired or really out of it. They never left room for questions for me either.

Yeah, I don't think the one guy had very much knowledge of English, so he was quiet most of the interview until he did the Japanese test for me. I felt okay though, they seemed friendly enough and encouraging. There were no real tough questions or good cop-bad cop. Pretty much just like a normal interview.

tiger_claw448
February 24th, 2014, 02:04
Mine was also done by 2 guys, a former JET and a Japanese dude. It was rather straightforward, which actually threw me off guard as I prepared for the worst. At the end there was a mock lesson and Japanese test, anyone lack one or both? Also, my time slot was right before lunch, and they didnt ask if I had any questions for them, until I brought it up in the very end. Does anyone smell rejection already??? lol

Jamie Solo
February 24th, 2014, 02:56
Mine was also done by 2 guys, a former JET and a Japanese dude. It was rather straightforward, which actually threw me off guard as I prepared for the worst. At the end there was a mock lesson and Japanese test, anyone lack one or both? Also, my time slot was right before lunch, and they didnt ask if I had any questions for them, until I brought it up in the very end. Does anyone smell rejection already??? lol

Nah, but they probably did smell lunch...

spman2099
February 24th, 2014, 04:18
Mine was also done by 2 guys, a former JET and a Japanese dude. It was rather straightforward, which actually threw me off guard as I prepared for the worst. At the end there was a mock lesson and Japanese test, anyone lack one or both? Also, my time slot was right before lunch, and they didnt ask if I had any questions for them, until I brought it up in the very end. Does anyone smell rejection already??? lol

Well, I didn't get asked if I had any questions either. I have encountered a few other people that experienced the same thing this year. So, either it is more common this year, or none of us are getting in and this is a sign of our rapidly impending DOOM.

Coolmanio
February 24th, 2014, 04:36
Well, I didn't get asked if I had any questions either. I have encountered a few other people that experienced the same thing this year. So, either it is more common this year, or none of us are getting in and this is a sign of our rapidly impending DOOM.

I interviewed in Calgary and they asked me if I had any questions...... Eh, maybe it's just Toronto! Was anyone else asked to reconfirm their medical and criminal history and/or asked what level they would prefer to teach?

dstin
February 24th, 2014, 06:02
Was anyone else asked to reconfirm their medical and criminal history and/or asked what level they would prefer to teach?

Yes, asked to reconfirm that stuff but I was in Texas not Canada.

LaVie
February 24th, 2014, 08:17
I interviewed in Calgary and they asked me if I had any questions...... Eh, maybe it's just Toronto! Was anyone else asked to reconfirm their medical and criminal history and/or asked what level they would prefer to teach?

Oh wait, we did have to reconfirm all that stuff before actually going to the interview (through email).

Tarepanda
February 24th, 2014, 12:55
Mine was also done by 2 guys, a former JET and a Japanese dude. It was rather straightforward, which actually threw me off guard as I prepared for the worst. At the end there was a mock lesson and Japanese test, anyone lack one or both? Also, my time slot was right before lunch, and they didnt ask if I had any questions for them, until I brought it up in the very end. Does anyone smell rejection already??? lol

I interviewed in Toronto on the first day with a Japanese guy and a female ex-JET from Australia. I did the mock lesson (which I fucked up royally) & Japanese test. My time slot was also right before lunch (it was sort of creepy when I left because the registration room door was closed and the hallways were deserted lol), but I got asked if I had questions for them. I think it really just depends who you got on your panel.

I bumped into a random interviewee on my way out and I don't think she got asked if she had any questions.

During my time slot they interviewed 4 people. At least I only spoke with 4 people... :|

Shincantsen
February 25th, 2014, 00:13
How often would a candidate have 4 people on an interview panel?

The number of people on an interview panel and their positions (ex-JET, professor, diplomat, etc) just depend on how large the consulate/embassy is and how many people they have at their disposal.

HorseFeathers
February 25th, 2014, 01:34
So I'm guessing that if there were four to a panel they had a surplus of extra people? I only had the standard three at mine.

PoorYorick
February 25th, 2014, 04:00
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flapjack21
February 25th, 2014, 07:16
Had my interview in SF on Friday at 11. The odd thing before even starting my interview was that I was the only guy there, there rest were ladies (about 15?). Just an odd observation.

My interview I thought went well enough until they asked me what grade level I wanted to teach, I said any was fine but they looked like they wanted a definitive answer so I said elementary. Later on they asked me to demonstrate my level of Japanese knowledge and I completely froze and it did not go over well. That's when the main woman who was interviewing me asked the ex-JET that I said elementary for what I wanted to teach and then responded that she thinks that it would be better to have someone who was more proficient at Japanese teaching such young children. Otherwise the interview went about as expected, no left field questions mostly standard stuff. They did keep asking how I would do if placed in the rural side, kept returning to this about 3 or 4 different times so perhaps if I do get in it will be way out in the boonies.

One thing I was happy about was making them laugh early in the interview, also the main woman interviewing me had a coughing fit right in the middle of the interview and had to step outside. Overall not really sure how it went because when I stepped outside I looked at my phone and only 15 minutes had passed, even the greeters looked surprised to see me out so quickly.

Also does anyone here have experience with early departure? I applied for it and have all my paperwork in but wasn't sure if it would hurt or help my chances.

Gizmotech
February 25th, 2014, 08:15
Early departure will not help or hurt your chances at all.

In my prefecture in Japan, there are more women than men ALTs.

The rural question often comes up like that if you come from a relatively large and or convenient city. Japanese rural can be very.... nowhere. Many ALTs can't hack it.

johnny
February 25th, 2014, 08:44
Early departure will not help or hurt your chances at all.

In my prefecture in Japan, there are more women than men ALTs.

The rural question often comes up like that if you come from a relatively large and or convenient city. Japanese rural can be very.... nowhere. Many ALTs can't hack it.

Yeah dude, I could see that as being really, really hard for someone with experience living abroad, let alone someone who hasn't any experience living abroad.

I think I would find it really difficult. I live in a town of 55,000, but we have about 210,000 in the area. We have any core Western stuff you would want to survive plus other Westerners. I think it would be hard to thrive without that stuff.

Gizmotech
February 25th, 2014, 09:05
Yeah dude, I could see that as being really, really hard for someone with experience living abroad, let alone someone who hasn't any experience living abroad.

I think I would find it really difficult. I live in a town of 55,000, but we have about 210,000 in the area. We have any core Western stuff you would want to survive plus other Westerners. I think it would be hard to thrive without that stuff.


Ya, at the beginning it can be REALLY hard. Especially if you have limited Japanese, or you aren't that bubbly idiot who will talk to anything moving or not... The longer you are in an area, the easier it becomes, but many ALTs who have limited "away from home" experience, or no international living experience (a one month trip does not count imo) get REALLY depressed really quickly.

Even in my town of 100,000 people, (really about 60k, but the town area is f'n massive) it was rough until I met a good group of Japanese people (after having improved my spoken Japanese) and started to live here, rather than visit.

johnny
February 25th, 2014, 09:32
Ya, at the beginning it can be REALLY hard. Especially if you have limited Japanese, or you aren't that bubbly idiot who will talk to anything moving or not... The longer you are in an area, the easier it becomes, but many ALTs who have limited "away from home" experience, or no international living experience (a one month trip does not count imo) get REALLY depressed really quickly.

Even in my town of 100,000 people, (really about 60k, but the town area is f'n massive) it was rough until I met a good group of Japanese people (after having improved my spoken Japanese) and started to live here, rather than visit.

Good for you. I think the continuous improvements to technology that we enjoy, living abroad becomes much easier (I think this life would have been super tough pre-internet). That said, you can't take the human element out of things. You need people with whom you can speak.

I'm impressed you developed a good relationship with Japanese people because the language barrier can make that a big challenge. I am working hard to improve my Japanese, but it's slow going.

I suppose you had good motivation. That helps.

HorseFeathers
February 25th, 2014, 10:10
Oddly enough, I asked about teaching in elementary school even though I have no Japanese language skills. And although they said they typically try to get JETs who know a moderate amount of Japanese, they said they would make a note on my application that I was interested and see if they could make an exception.

Iunno if they were just being polite but they did write something down. So... there's that.

johnny
February 25th, 2014, 10:21
If you get hired as a municipal ALT, there is a strong possibility that you will teach at both ES's as well as JHS's. There are a lot of ALT's I know who have at best a rudimentary knowledge of Japanese but still teach in ES's. If you happen to have a school with JTE's who have relatively strong English skills, then it would work just fine. If you don't have JTE's who are incapable or unwilling to speak English, then you'll adapt and learn the core words and phrases you need to succeed.

LaVie
February 25th, 2014, 10:23
You interviewed in --- right? We may have crossed paths!

Gizmotech
February 25th, 2014, 10:30
Oddly enough, I asked about teaching in elementary school even though I have no Japanese language skills. And although they said they typically try to get JETs who know a moderate amount of Japanese, they said they would make a note on my application that I was interested and see if they could make an exception.

Iunno if they were just being polite but they did write something down. So... there's that.

A guy who came on the same day as me got stuck doing the ES/JHS travelling circus beat. He had 0 Japanese. He now has one of the best Japanese levels for ALTs in the area, but in his first year he spoke nada. Most of his coworkers barely spoke anything more than the simplest English.

Shit happens.

@Johnny. One thing that I think made a huge difference is I wasn't trying to make friends with young people where I live (not that there are many). I was making friends with adults (late 30's to 50's) which made it MUCH easier, especially because I don't act like a child or a tourist. I gave off the impression that I live where I live, and while I might have fun, I'm not fucking round and being a disrespectful turd like many of the foreigners they have seen in the past.

HorseFeathers
February 25th, 2014, 10:31
-DELETED-

hypatia
February 25th, 2014, 12:11
I interviewed in Calgary and they asked me if I had any questions...... Eh, maybe it's just Toronto! Was anyone else asked to reconfirm their medical and criminal history and/or asked what level they would prefer to teach?

They also had me verbally reconfirm medical/health history, but absolutely no questions about grade level I might prefer to teach. I have experience working with teenagers (specifically 13-15 year olds) that I mentioned in my SoP, and I referenced it in passing at one point when I was answering something else, so perhaps they felt that that I had already addressed that question.

Gizmotech
February 25th, 2014, 12:35
Did you indicate a preference on your application? That's usually when they bring it up. I checked on mine that I did not want to work with young kids, so they asked me about it. I lied of course and said I'd figure it out, but honestly had I been placed with the rug rats I wouldn't have come on JET.

hypatia
February 25th, 2014, 12:57
Did you indicate a preference on your application? That's usually when they bring it up. I checked on mine that I did not want to work with young kids, so they asked me about it. I lied of course and said I'd figure it out, but honestly had I been placed with the rug rats I wouldn't have come on JET.

I just read over the application three times to make sure I wasn't crazy, but (as far as I can tell) there isn't actually anywhere to indicate ES/JHS/SHS preference on this year's application.

Gizmotech
February 25th, 2014, 12:58
It was specifically to indicate a preferred level, but when I did it (4 years ago now) there was an option on the canadian application to the effect of:
do you mind working with small children?

which was the HS/JHS+ES divider line.

johnny
February 25th, 2014, 13:14
I forget whether it was on the application or whether I was asked in the interview. I think I was verbally asked last year when I think on it.

hypatia
February 25th, 2014, 13:36
but when I did it (4 years ago now) there was an option on the canadian application...

Hmm. Application year difference, country difference (I'm in the US), or both? Canadians who applied this year, do you remember if you had this question?


P.S. Holy cow the Canada JET page actually looks professional and not like the US website that looks like someone set it up with tables in HTML back in the early naughts. And Papyrus. WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT?? The only thing that reminds me more of middle school power point projects is comic sans.

Coolmanio
February 25th, 2014, 14:11
Hmm. Application year difference, country difference (I'm in the US), or both? Canadians who applied this year, do you remember if you had this question?


P.S. Holy cow the Canada JET page actually looks professional and not like the US website that looks like someone set it up with tables in HTML back in the early naughts. And Papyrus. WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT?? The only thing that reminds me more of middle school power point projects is comic sans.

Nope, the Canadian application did not include a question about what grade level you would like to teacher. Nor did it ask you if you would mind working with small children.

Gizmotech
February 25th, 2014, 14:26
I guess they must've removed that one. Ahh well, all the better I suppose given how many more JHS/ES positions there are compared to SHS positions.

nostos
February 25th, 2014, 20:33
I interviewed in Toronto - my candidate card at least asked for a preferred school level (circle one): ES, JHS, SHS, no pref.

Jurassyk
February 25th, 2014, 23:38
So, the more and more I think about my interview the more nervous I get. I actually feel confident that at least one of the three interviewers liked me, and I think it's likely so did the others; however, I wonder about my qualifications. Has anyone ever heard of a situation where the interviewers liked a candidates personality, but declined to endorse them?

Jamie Solo
February 26th, 2014, 00:03
Has anyone ever heard of a situation where the interviewers liked a candidates personality, but declined to endorse them?

No one gets any feedback from interviews, so its pretty hard to actually tell if a situation like this comes up. Short of looking at how people thought their interview went and the outcome anyway.

TomOmnomnom
February 26th, 2014, 06:24
I've genuinely no idea how my interview went. My panel consisted of just two people, a Japanese dude and a British lady, both of whom seemed pretty nice, although petty inscrutable too. The questions I was asked were all pretty general: I was not really asked anything that pertained to my statement of purpose apart form my placement choices. I felt that there was a ton of stuff that they could have tried to catch me out on from my statement of purpose. In my statement I mentioned teaching experience, lesson plans, and one or two sentences were actually quite vague, and I was certain these would have been brought up as talking points. Ultimately, I feel I didn't have a great opportunity to convey myself/ my personality at all.
I guess the uk interview period is over, so I think I'm safe posting this: I was asked how I would explain the difference between the House of Lords and the Houses of Parliament, which totally threw me. I said I'd google it and tell whomever asked me the next day.
The panel was running late the day of my interview, and my slot was right before lunch which I think put the odds against my favour.
Uk candidates were also not allowed to ask questions during the interview, but could ask the ex-JETs looking after us anything we wanted. They were all armed with clipboards and seemed to be referring back to them whenever a key phrase or piece of Japanese etc. was mentioned, but this is probably just my paranoia. We were constantly reassured that whatever we said outside the interview room had no bearing on anything at all.
Urgh, I've had already had a month to dwell on it. Not sure how I'm going to survive until April....

LaVie
February 26th, 2014, 09:18
Did you interview on Tuesday afternoon? Because we might have! I was chatting up everyone in the waiting room.
Ah, unfortunately not. I had my interview Wednesday at 10:35 am!

HorseFeathers
February 26th, 2014, 09:21
P.S. Holy cow the Canada JET page actually looks professional and not like the US website that looks like someone set it up with tables in HTML back in the early naughts. And Papyrus. WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT?? The only thing that reminds me more of middle school power point projects is comic sans.

LOL. My brother in law glanced at the website over my shoulder one day and the papyrus font was the one thing he picked up and joked about. Asking why the JET program's website hadn't been updated since the 90s. So your comment made me laugh all over again.

And bummer, LaVie. Maybe we'll see each other on the flight over? Although with each passing day, the more and more I feel like I probably won't be accepted. I think I'm just trying to cushion the blow if it comes.

LaVie
February 26th, 2014, 09:29
LOL. My brother in law glanced at the website over my shoulder one day and the papyrus font was the one thing he picked up and joked about. Asking why the JET program's website hadn't been updated since the 90s. So your comment made me laugh all over again.

And bummer, LaVie. Maybe we'll see each other on the flight over? Although with each passing day, the more and more I feel like I probably won't be accepted. I think I'm just trying to cushion the blow if it comes.


Haha, I'm with you there. The more I think about it, the more acceptance seems highly unlikely.
We can hope though! :P

therealwindycity
February 26th, 2014, 09:38
P.S. Holy cow the Canada JET page actually looks professional and not like the US website that looks like someone set it up with tables in HTML back in the early naughts. And Papyrus. WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT?? The only thing that reminds me more of middle school power point projects is comic sans.

They haven't updated it since I applied three years ago. I checked all the various countries' application pages when I was compiling info about application deadlines this year and the US is definitely the worst.

miamicoordinator
February 26th, 2014, 22:29
Just had my interview today in Miami, it was not nearly as horrible as I anticipated. I was expecting difficult/awkward questions but everything was pretty standard and related to my application. Of course I've started thinking of things I could have said better, should have brought up, or moments that were slightly awkward. It could go either way, but I'm trying to stay positive. I did get a few smiles and some "wonderful"s, but that could just be the interviewers being polite while actually thinking I'm full of shit. Ah well. I'm going to try not to torture myself. I did the best I could, and there's nothing more I can do at this point to get this job. Good luck to everyone!

Just stay positive. Not even we know what will happen until April.


I dont remember any awkward momment in your interview though o.o

uthinkimlost?
February 26th, 2014, 22:49
herpaderp interviewborked awkwarderp!


Just stay positive. Not even we know what will happen until April.


I dont remember any awkward momment in your interview though o.o

-and this is why we don't use real names.

Jamie Solo
February 26th, 2014, 23:03
-and this is why we don't use real names.

This has been an I Think I'm Lost Public Service Announcement.

But seriously, who wouldn't want to get some sort of feedback after an interview? =P

miamicoordinator
February 26th, 2014, 23:05
You'd be surprised how easy it is to know who people are even without real names just by reading their posts ^_-

kelleycristin
February 26th, 2014, 23:49
-and this is why we don't use real names.

I wondered about that, but I don't intend to ever post something that breeches privacy or reflects exceptionally poorly on me as a person. I've never signed up and participated in a forum site before, I came across ITIL when I was looking for information regarding people's experiences with JET a few months ago.
Remembered it, happened to stumble across this thread, and figured I'd sign up and get it off my chest. Hopefully it doesn't negatively impact my chances.

Miamicoordinator - Awkward was the wrong word to use. There are some moments I feel I didn't capitalize on, or some points I feel I didn't stress to the best of my ability. I think everyone who interviewed me knows that I want to improve my Japanese, but I'm not sure that I stressed the cultural aspect of my desire to participate in JET. Which happens to be a large part of JET's goals and a large part of why I want to participate.
Thank you, that's what I'm doing from here on out. I realize that there are many more applicants than available positions and that your job is incredibly difficult. Thank you again for your time!

Shincantsen
February 26th, 2014, 23:51
-and this is why we don't use real names.

It's not a great idea. Applicants (in the US, anyway) signed an agreement that they wouldn't disclose any part of their interview, and there's a lot of disclosure going on in these forums. If you're going to talk about your interview in detail, you probably should make an effort to hide your identity/consulate.

kelleycristin
February 27th, 2014, 00:02
It's not a great idea. Applicants (in the US, anyway) signed an agreement that they wouldn't disclose any part of their interview, and there's a lot of disclosure going on in these forums. If you're going to talk about your interview in detail, you probably should make an effort to hide your identity/consulate.

I didn't think saying everything was standard really said much about my interview. Of course I would never post specific questions I was asked or who interviewed me. Is there a way to delete posts? The coordinator from my consulate has already seen and replied to my post, but if that was a breech of privacy I'd like to remove it!

LaVie
February 27th, 2014, 00:03
I didn't think saying everything was standard really said much about my interview. Of course I would never post specific questions I was asked or who interviewed me. Is there a way to delete posts? The coordinator from my consulate has already seen and replied to my post, but if that was a breech of privacy I'd like to remove it!

Ha, if (s)he really is the coordinator from Miami, (s)he's violated her/his end of the deal as well.

miamicoordinator
February 27th, 2014, 00:07
It's not a great idea. Applicants (in the US, anyway) signed an agreement that they wouldn't disclose any part of their interview, and there's a lot of disclosure going on in these forums. If you're going to talk about your interview in detail, you probably should make an effort to hide your identity/consulate.

100% this.

I think it is human nature to vent and be be frustrated with aspects of the interview. I don't think there is anything wrong with speaking in generalizations on the website about what has happened to each and every one of you. What would definitely be frowned upon is someone came here and said "Oh the male panelist I had in middle earth consulate was such a jerk to me. He asked me (specific question 1) and (specific question 2). He definitely had it out for me!"

Middle Earth Consulate might only have one male panelist so it would be very easy to tell who you are talking about. Many coordinators read forums like these, but usually only lurk. So, don't bash specific panelists and don't specify what your questions were and you should be fine.

miamicoordinator
February 27th, 2014, 00:10
I didn't think saying everything was standard really said much about my interview. Of course I would never post specific questions I was asked or who interviewed me. Is there a way to delete posts? The coordinator from my consulate has already seen and replied to my post, but if that was a breech of privacy I'd like to remove it!

Do not worry. You have not mentioned anything specific about the interview.

You merely expressed your thoughts and feelings on the matter. No worries.

miamicoordinator
February 27th, 2014, 00:11
Ha, if (s)he really is the coordinator from Miami, (s)he's violated her/his end of the deal as well.

I am most definitely a he!

LaVie
February 27th, 2014, 00:13
I am most definitely a he!

Noted :P No offense meant; I couldn't remember if you had specified your sex in any of your posts!

kelleycristin
February 27th, 2014, 00:14
Ha, if (s)he really is the coordinator from Miami, (s)he's violated her/his end of the deal as well.

Maybe so, but miamicoordinator potentially being in violation doesn't make my violation OK. I went ahead and removed my post, although it does show up quoted in another post.

LaVie
February 27th, 2014, 00:18
Maybe so, but miamicoordinator potentially being in violation doesn't make my violation OK. I went ahead and removed my post, although it does show up quoted in another post.

Certain things that come up in the interview are a given, so there's really no concern (or at least there shouldn't be) in discussing them. I think what they don't want are things like calling out interviewers by name or any other personal details, or details pertaining to any mock lessons given, or more specific and nuanced questions that may have come up during the interview.

kelleycristin
February 27th, 2014, 00:19
Do not worry. You have not mentioned anything specific about the interview.

You merely expressed your thoughts and feelings on the matter. No worries.

I just saw your reply, whew! Thank you!

uthinkimlost?
February 27th, 2014, 00:21
Maybe so, but miamicoordinator potentially being in violation doesn't make my violation OK. I went ahead and removed my post, although it does show up quoted in another post.

I edited my quotation. That will be 50 bitcoins, please.

Ini
February 27th, 2014, 00:33
I wouldn't worry too much. It's not as if any of you said one of the panelists was a grey haired old twat.

yo mike - just for men - make it happen.

kelleycristin
February 27th, 2014, 00:34
Certain things that come up in the interview are a given, so there's really no concern (or at least there shouldn't be) in discussing them. I think what they don't want are things like calling out interviewers by name or any other personal details, or details pertaining to any mock lessons given, or more specific and nuanced questions that may have come up during the interview.

Yeah I agree. And I got confirmation from miamicoordinator that I'm fine! :D Apparently I'm very behind in seeing responses ><

miamicoordinator
February 27th, 2014, 00:45
I wouldn't worry too much. It's not as if any of you said one of the panelists was a grey haired old twat.

yo mike - just for men - make it happen.

Haha! Come on now! I've been gray since 13, I am so over just for men. Been there done that, not going back.

Jedirust
February 27th, 2014, 01:38
I edited my quotation. That will be 50 bitcoins, please.

The future of bitcoin speculation might be over anyway.

Mt.Gox site disappears, Bitcoin future in doubt - Feb. 25, 2014 (http://money.cnn.com/2014/02/25/technology/security/mtgox-bitcoin/)



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

itsabird
February 27th, 2014, 03:12
Maybe I have my information mixed up, but isn't there a coordinator that's applying for jet this year? Could have sworn I heard that somewhere....

HorseFeathers
February 27th, 2014, 07:28
I tried to be careful not to mention any questions or specifics about my interview. But now I wonder if I said too much.

itsabird
February 27th, 2014, 09:16
I tried to be careful not to mention any questions or specifics about my interview. But now I wonder if I said too much.

We're all probably thinking that now lol.

uthinkimlost?
February 27th, 2014, 09:24
We're all probably thinking that now lol.

Unless any of you posted about how you're going to Nippon looking for a55, you're all fine. Just remember that anonymity is best.

flapjack21
February 27th, 2014, 10:09
Oh boy I sure do hope to find some donkeys in Japan.

At first I didn't get what a55 was and thought it might be either some legal jargon or some sort of visa type thing and then it hit me.

uthinkimlost?
February 27th, 2014, 13:03
Oh boy I sure do hope to find some donkeys in Japan.

At first I didn't get what a55 was and thought it might be either some legal jargon or some sort of visa type thing and then it hit me.

Nothing quite like getting hit by some a55, amiright?

itsabird
February 27th, 2014, 14:05
Oh boy I sure do hope to find some donkeys in Japan.

At first I didn't get what a55 was and thought it might be either some legal jargon or some sort of visa type thing and then it hit me.

I was in the same boat until I read your reply. Clever numbers to replace letter. Who woulda-thunked-it.

kbui
March 4th, 2014, 17:21
I wonder when we'll exactly hear back. I heard that last year people started hearing back on April 1st, but that it also depends on the consulate. I hope I hear good news from Chicago next month! :D

Gizmotech
March 4th, 2014, 20:30
Last year, America was the slowest. It all depends how long it takes to disseminate the information from the primary source to the various embassies and how long it takes for them to get sorted. Australia is usually first as they have the least amour of administration to deal with.

miamicoordinator
March 4th, 2014, 22:17
I wonder when we'll exactly hear back. I heard that last year people started hearing back on April 1st, but that it also depends on the consulate. I hope I hear good news from Chicago next month! :D

Not even us coordinators have an exact date unfortunately.

Since the majority of jets come from the u.s., it does take some time for the contracting organizations to pick who they want and for clair to know how many spaces are available.

We nornally find out by the end of march or first week of april.

Trust me when i tell you that we are just as anxious to see our numbers for the upcoming year.

Cutthroat-finch
March 5th, 2014, 14:23
Can someone correct me if I don't understand this correctly? The panel who interviewed us will either recommend or not recommend us for the program. This information will then be sent to Tokyo where a decision will be made based on the recommendation and on the application. It seems like if you are recommended by the panel, your application has high marks, and there is room, you will be offered a position. If you are not recommended by the panel then it is pretty safe to say you will not be offered a position. Is there any reason why we can't be made aware of the status of our interview when it is sent to Tokyo? It seems like that would make this process of waiting much easier.

Kdes23
March 5th, 2014, 15:13
Can someone correct me if I don't understand this correctly? The panel who interviewed us will either recommend or not recommend us for the program. This information will then be sent to Tokyo where a decision will be made based on the recommendation and on the application. It seems like if you are recommended by the panel, your application has high marks, and there is room, you will be offered a position. If you are not recommended by the panel then it is pretty safe to say you will not be offered a position. Is there any reason why we can't be made aware of the status of our interview when it is sent to Tokyo? It seems like that would make this process of waiting much easier.

Well there's those of us recommended and not. Within that list of recommended people, there are rankings. At the same time though, things like having a drivers license, having experience with disabled people, or just any unique assets that you hold, can override where you rank on this list. You're right though, the list is sent to CLAIR in Tokyo. The Board of Education (BOE) offices and the Prefectural offices (PO) collaborate with CLAIR. The BOEs and POs select who they want, and tell CLAIR, and then CLAIR tells the embassy or consulate.

Why can't we be notified of our status? I think it has something to do with the due date for ALT's to tell their BOE/PO if they'll be re-contracting.

word
March 5th, 2014, 15:48
Can someone correct me if I don't understand this correctly? The panel who interviewed us will either recommend or not recommend us for the program. This information will then be sent to Tokyo where a decision will be made based on the recommendation and on the application. It seems like if you are recommended by the panel, your application has high marks, and there is room, you will be offered a position. If you are not recommended by the panel then it is pretty safe to say you will not be offered a position. Is there any reason why we can't be made aware of the status of our interview when it is sent to Tokyo? It seems like that would make this process of waiting much easier.They're also dealing with thousands of ALTs and potential ALTs; there's a lot going on. Besides, you're talking about Japanese bureaucracy. Your average oak tree moves significantly faster. It's actually impressive that they're able to get it all done as quickly as they do.

miamicoordinator
March 5th, 2014, 22:31
Can someone correct me if I don't understand this correctly? The panel who interviewed us will either recommend or not recommend us for the program. This information will then be sent to Tokyo where a decision will be made based on the recommendation and on the application. It seems like if you are recommended by the panel, your application has high marks, and there is room, you will be offered a position. If you are not recommended by the panel then it is pretty safe to say you will not be offered a position. Is there any reason why we can't be made aware of the status of our interview when it is sent to Tokyo? It seems like that would make this process of waiting much easier.

Kdes and word have shared some good information, but i will shed a little more light on this subject.

For the most part, you are right cutthroat finch, each panel will score each applicant on a point based system. After we are.done interviewing everyone, we organize applicants into one master list and this is sent to tokyo. There are obviously people with high marks, middle marks, and low marks. The problem is the following.

Just because you have high marks does, it does not guarantee you will be selected and lower or middle marks is not a death sentence either. I will explain further.

Lets say my consulate interviewed 50 people this year(not the real number). Out of those 50, lets say we are not recommending 5 of them. That leaves us with 45 people we are recommending. Now the problem is, not even we have the exact number of people who will be short listed this year. We can only go by how many people were sent from our location in previous years.

So lets say last year we sent 25 people, and the year before that we sent 15 (remember how many people we send depends on openings in the program, so it varies every year). Then the issue becomes how many people will be short listed this year? 25 again? Or 15 like the year before? Or maybe we will only get 10, or as high are 35. We really do not know, so we make our recommendation list as good as we can hoping our top picks make it in, but again, there is no guarantee.

So back to our hypothetical number of 45 people recommended. Sure, we can most likely safely say the first 10 people on the list will be shortlisted, but what of the other 35? Many of them might be short listed as well if we get a high number of participants. Or none of them may be short listed if we get a small number. The point is we do not know. That is why we are honestly cannot tell people anything until we receive the list for ourselves. It would be unfair to the other 35 applicants if we told the first 10 they were going already. Unless everyone knows their place(as an alternate or short lister) we cannot disclose that information.

Another issue is that just because you are at the top of the list, it does not mean 100% placement either. If you have some medical condition where you need to be near a hospital and no placements are available to fit your needs, you may not be short listed even though you were a top pick.

I agree, knowing your ranking would make it easier for people if they knew they wete at the top of the list, but it would be even more nerveracking for those in the middle area who have the posibility of either being an alternate or shortlisted. Out of fairness for everyone, we do not disclose this information until we can give everyone a definitive answer.


Sorry this is so long, but i hope it is clear why we cannot just tell people whether or jot they will be able to go at this stage of the selection process.

Cutthroat-finch
March 7th, 2014, 01:59
Thank for your the information miamicoordinator! Your explanation really helps to understand how the process works.

flapjack21
March 12th, 2014, 07:35
So I just found out today that I was selected for early departure and will be leaving April 8th. Apparently I'm going to be located way down in Nagasaki Prefecture. I was wondering if we could start a thread about what advice people had on packing.

Kdes23
March 12th, 2014, 08:33
So I just found out today that I was selected for early departure and will be leaving April 8th. Apparently I'm going to be located way down in Nagasaki Prefecture. I was wondering if we could start a thread about what advice people had on packing.

Why don't you make it :P

Oh, and congratulations!

johnny
March 12th, 2014, 08:33
Start one!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Shelia
March 12th, 2014, 10:42
So I just found out today that I was selected for early departure and will be leaving April 8th. Apparently I'm going to be located way down in Nagasaki Prefecture. I was wondering if we could start a thread about what advice people had on packing.
Congrats!

kenkennif
March 18th, 2014, 12:09
I wanna go to Nagasaki.

No, I wanna go anywhere where they have more sunshine than up here...

kenkennif
March 18th, 2014, 12:09
Do they give out placements in Hawai?

therealwindycity
March 18th, 2014, 13:27
Do they give out placements in Hawai?

Hawai, Tottori - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawai,_Tottori)
?

HorseFeathers
March 18th, 2014, 14:26
Tottori was one of my requests. :)

Spacey
March 18th, 2014, 15:01
There is an ALT or two in Hawai, but I'm not sure if they're leaving this year or not. That being said, there are quiet a few openings coming up in Tottori-ken, so maybe I'll see you here!

kbui
March 21st, 2014, 14:13
THE WAIT IS KILLING ME.

par92186
March 21st, 2014, 15:45
THE WAIT IS KILLING ME.

start to practice your bowing to kill the time. yesterday i did over 4,000 bows and a whole 5 minutes went by that I wasn't thinking about JET or ITIL. When we all get into the program you'll know exactly who I am because everyone will be talking about the smoooooooth bower at orientation

AVN
March 21st, 2014, 20:16
THE WAIT IS KILLING ME.
Being on the forums will only make that worse.