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Wasabi
April 7th, 2014, 00:33
Hi all,

What did everyone bring (if anything) as a present for your JTE's/principals/vice principals/etc? I was thinking along the lines of boxes of Girl Scout cookies or votives from Yankee Candle (their factory is about 40 minutes away from my home town). I don't know if those would be weird or not, though. I also remember seeing that people were getting away from bringing omiyage? Any input?

Ocaoca
April 7th, 2014, 00:48
I've heard that omiyage is almost always edible goods, so it's probably best to stick with that.

nostos
April 7th, 2014, 01:37
Things that are individually wrapped are best, if its to share.

Gizmotech
April 7th, 2014, 06:49
edible goods, individually wrappable if they spoil quickly, and DON'T BOTHER.

Seriously... biggest on-going lie on jet. You don't need to bring em, and noone will care if you do or don't.

coop52
April 7th, 2014, 07:14
I didn't bother bringing any since I didn't have space. Don't fret too much about it and only bring stuff if you have room. No one really expects you to know about omiyage culture at first anyway. If you really want to bring something, stick with something edible and individually wrapped. Non-edible things aren't as good since they take up space in people's tiny homes.

Jiggit
April 7th, 2014, 08:45
biggest on-going lie on jet

Word.

Gift giving culture in Japan is not like that. Enough snacks or candy so that everyone in the staffroom gets one or nothing at all. Every train station in Japan will have some kind of "regional specialty" (usually invented for this purpose entirely) of rice cracker or crappy "cake" in boxes of 40 for people to take back to their workplace after going on vacation. So if you want to bring something make sure it fits this category or you'll just confuse people. Even finding the right time to give individual gifts will be awkward and frankly if you give something to the VP in front of other teachers that you give nothing to it's pretty improper.

God knows how ALTs can manage to live in Japan for a year or more and not figure this out. My predecessor lived here for two years and still told me to bring individual gifts for the Principal, VPs and JTEs but not for everyone else.

Jiggit
April 7th, 2014, 08:48
If you do want to bring something I would just bring a box of something like lindt and go around shyly giving one to everyone and introducing yourself (saying yoroshiku and bowing 10 times). Especially if you're a girl they'll be talking about how kind you are all week.

webstaa
April 7th, 2014, 08:59
I brought shitty magnets and crap from my hometown. Honestly it wasn't necessary or worth it. For most ALTs coming over in the summer - your arriving during summer break anyways, so you might not even get a chance to great everybody in a meeting etc. If you have a candy company or something near you, I'd say go with that - get small (individual serving and wrapped) and give to Principal, VP, and then everybody else in the staff-room. You aren't giving them useless junk (although maybe junk food) but it'll give you a chance to actually meet everyone instead of just hanging around with the JTEs.

CannedCoffee
April 7th, 2014, 10:01
I brought some stuff to give the Principal, VP and my JTEs and ended up forgetting the whole idea. I ended up only passing out the candies I brought for the whole staff room and that probably went over better than awkwardly giving presents to a small group of people.

I ended up bringing the magnets and crap meant for omiyage and giving it out to students as stamp card prizes.

Basically just don't bother with anything more than the individually wrapped snacks. You're not expected to know the whole gift giving culture and it's a waste of money and bag space otherwise.

yingyangryder
April 7th, 2014, 10:21
Agreed, don`t worry too much. I ended up bringing a lot of Omiyage for fear I would not be liked if I didn`t. They were pleasantly surprised but didn`t care a whole bunch and as mentioned, you are not expected to know about Omiyage yet anyway. But, individually wrapped snacks are definitely the way to go if you are set on bringing some.

therealwindycity
April 7th, 2014, 10:24
Also, at the risk of perpetuating the "ITIL is full of bitter people" stereotype, don't be too offended when your coworkers don't actually eat it or complain about how sweet/big/whatever it is. If you do take gifts, remember that the gesture is the important thing and don't get too invested.

Jiggit
April 7th, 2014, 10:31
you are not expected to know about Omiyage yet anyway

I dunno I suspect omiyage might be one of those things that only Japanese do but assume is a universal law of existence.


Also, at the risk of perpetuating the "ITIL is full of bitter people" stereotype, don't be too offended when your coworkers don't actually eat it or complain about how sweet/big/whatever it is. If you do take gifts, remember that the gesture is the important thing and don't get too invested.

That's why I recommended going around and handing it out/leaving it on people's desks. I think if it doesn't look like Japan omiyage then they might not get that it's for them. But yes, there are plenty of fvckers who'll eat sh1tty Japanese food and tell you it's oishii out of a sense of duty and then complain that foreign food is too sweet (sasuga) after taking your gift.

"But Japanese are so polite!" Bollocks. /rant

mrcharisma
April 7th, 2014, 10:42
I'd re-iterate the don't bother, 10 times over. It's little more than a lie perpetuated by Jets to make the fresh meat sweat a little.

As has been said before, it's awkward for you, will likely make others feel awkward and can potentially mark you out as rude or crawling on day 1. By all means crack out one big bag of cheapshite chocolate from your home country and put it in a communal part of the staffroom, but there's no need for anything else.

Jiggit
April 7th, 2014, 10:53
As has been said before, it's awkward for you, will likely make others feel awkward and can potentially mark you out as rude or crawling on day 1.

We should probably stress this more. Giving an individual gift with others around is not only weird, it's potentially going to make you look bad. Others have been saying that it's not necessary but I'd actually say that it's a bad thing to do.

zombiekelly
April 7th, 2014, 12:28
I only brought something for when I came back from vacation, like everyone else did. Even then it was just some reeses.

mmarief09
April 7th, 2014, 14:33
I brought some maple sugar cookies which were individually wrapped and some hard maple sugar candies. I left them out for the teachers to take if they wanted to.

I got some maple syrup and post cards for my principal and vice principal but I gave it to them privately.

Do not bring anything that is not individually wrapped or that could melt. It will be very hot when you get here and you might not start school right away. That was the best advice I got.

The teachers didn`t go mad over anything- I know a lot of JETs who didn`t bring anything.

Wasabi
April 8th, 2014, 07:28
Alright, sounds good to me. I think if I do bring anything, it'll just be something to put in the staff room as mrcharisma suggested. I'm sure I'll be glad to have the extra space in my luggage when it comes time to pack. Thanks everyone!

Jedirust
April 8th, 2014, 08:29
I'm going to bring stuff I want to eat... If they don't want it, then I'll eat it. Problem solved.


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Kamirose
April 9th, 2014, 11:35
Bring stuff if you have extra space, otherwise don't bother.

I brought saltwater taffy for the teachers, and small (like, one serving) jars of marionberry jam for my supervisor and principal (gave them two jars each).

Randomgirl
April 9th, 2014, 11:53
Bring food. Cookies, candies (not chocolate - way too hot for that to survive). Maybe something practical, like a tea towel for a helpful neighbour or a cell phone strap for a female JTE. I stupidly lugged a framed art print of my city over for the BOE superintendent - we had a sister city relationship type of thing at the time, but boy what a pain that was. Food is more than fine. You can even order it from FBC, rakuten, or flying pig and have it shipped to your address ;) we do that every time we go to my husband's parents. Shh don't tell ;)

Page
April 9th, 2014, 12:14
I wouldn't say that it's a lie, every year when new staff come most of them bring snacks and omiyage with them as a "yoroshiku" in April. It's not expected or necessary as has been perpetuated by many a JET but I'd also say that the people who vehemently call it unnecessary are also wrong. Just don't call it omiyage because that will confuse them (since it's not the right word to use in that situation). It is a nice gesture, imo, but don't force it if you don't have space (it probably seems more out of place because we come in the middle of summer vacation, too). If you decide to bring something just stick to food, bringing things (stickers, mugs, pens, what have you) will probably warrant odd reactions because they give snacks, not stuff (stuff is given to friends and such, of course, but you're just coming and it may come off weird).

BambooTelegraph
April 10th, 2014, 09:50
Hi all,

What did everyone bring (if anything) as a present for your JTE's/principals/vice principals/etc? I was thinking along the lines of boxes of Girl Scout cookies or votives from Yankee Candle (their factory is about 40 minutes away from my home town). I don't know if those would be weird or not, though. I also remember seeing that people were getting away from bringing omiyage? Any input?

When I came my first year, I brought peanut butter and maple nut butter. The next year, I brought back peanut butter cups. When I returned from the US after my wedding, I brought blackberry tea (we ended up individually wrapping each packet... that was a chore).

If you're going to bring something, make sure it's individually wrapped.

bigfishnoj
June 21st, 2014, 17:42
Haha I am loving the responses from the more seasoned JETs here. Super realistic responses. I'm from Arizona and was going to bring some tiny Prickly Pear Cactus Jams just to chuckle at people's responses to the taste.

uthinkimlost?
June 21st, 2014, 18:43
The prickly pear gummies will travel better and be better received.

bigfishnoj
June 22nd, 2014, 00:01
Oh that's a good idea. I forgot about those. Well there we go. Done deal.

Cbill1
June 23rd, 2014, 09:01
At the Q & A session I was at, Mardi Gras beads were suggested as a good omiyage.

As I just finished school in New Orleans, I'll probably be going that route.

uthinkimlost?
June 23rd, 2014, 09:08
At the Q & A session I was at, Mardi Gras beads were suggested as a good omiyage.

As I just finished school in New Orleans, I'll probably be going that route.

a) Where would the recipient put cheap plastic beads?

b) If they were to ask what the beads were for, would you expose yourself to demonstrate how they are acquired?

Cbill1
June 23rd, 2014, 09:13
I'd say they're a part of a traditional American festival, of course! :P

Jiggit
June 23rd, 2014, 09:17
In all seriousness, if it isn't individually wrapped food for at least 50 people then you got bad advice.

mothy
June 23rd, 2014, 09:18
That sounds like terrible omiyage. Guaranteed for a landfill and to cause confusion.
Just skip the omiyage. Such a waste of money.

uthinkimlost?
June 23rd, 2014, 09:28
I'd say they're a part of a traditional American festival, of course! :P

-and let your 60 year old JTE drive around with 'I showed my tits to strangers' beads draped over her rearview?

Like Jiggit said, bring food, or if you must bring something inedible, make it something semi-useful like a keychain.

Bring some old-school candy from the south. The kind of stuff you only find at mom and pop shops.

Ini
June 23rd, 2014, 10:44
While rummaging around a BOE a few years back I found a cupboard that was stuffed with obscure "welcome gifts" from years of ALTs. Bring food or something useful or it will meet the same fate as that pile of crap

Jiggit
June 23rd, 2014, 10:46
Hah!

Gizmotech
June 23rd, 2014, 10:52
That's actually a really good idea. Like proper toffee or something. Hell, a bag of marshmallows would go down great as the stuff here is terrible compared to the ones you can get back home.

webstaa
June 23rd, 2014, 13:20
While rummaging around a BOE a few years back I found a cupboard that was stuffed with obscure "welcome gifts" from years of ALTs. Bring food or something useful or it will meet the same fate as that pile of crap

I gave my Principal a magnet and a US flag/star pattern bandanna (random shit, I know) - the magnet joined a couple others on the blackboard and the bandanna is now a tablecloth on the coffee table in his office. I'm sure there's crap from other ALTs around too. Food is a good idea, but don't bring anything that can't stand the heat of Tokyo/cold of an airplane's hold.

Jiggit
June 23rd, 2014, 13:22
If you're going to bring a present specifically for your principal and it isn't alcohol then don't bother.

kenkennif
June 23rd, 2014, 13:32
I brought them all kebabs from my local chippy. I ate most of them on the way over though, I wish I'd saved some for my third year....

ihatefall
June 24th, 2014, 23:42
Hi all,

What did everyone bring (if anything) as a present for your JTE's/principals/vice principals/etc? I was thinking along the lines of boxes of Girl Scout cookies or votives from Yankee Candle (their factory is about 40 minutes away from my home town). I don't know if those would be weird or not, though. I also remember seeing that people were getting away from bringing omiyage? Any input?

You're from New England right? Salt water taffy might be good for the staff. Maple candy from Vermont, the Yankee candles would be good (I would imagine things like the vanilla cookie etc would be good). Get a pamphlet for each one if you can. If you go to Quincy market (shutters) you mind find some stuff.

Randomgirl
June 25th, 2014, 01:15
One quick word about chewy/sticky food - a lot of Japanese people of that age have dental work and might not be able to eat it. Or at least use it asan excuse To not eat it!!

:P

Antonath
June 25th, 2014, 08:52
One quick word about chewy/sticky food - a lot of Japanese people of that age have dental work and might not be able to eat it. Or at least use it as an excuse to not eat it!!
Given the number of old people that kill themselves with sticky food every New Year, the excuse thing is more likely.

ihatefall
June 25th, 2014, 10:02
Given the number of old people that kill themselves with sticky food every New Year, the excuse thing is more likely.

Definitely bring sticky foods!


Seriously that is mochi, which is very different from taffy

Page
June 25th, 2014, 10:54
Yeah, I brought taffy when I came and it didn't go over well (that's the boxes that didn't melt on the way over). I was left with a lot of taffy (which would be awesome if I didn't hate it). Randomgirl is right about chewy and sticky foods (I got the same thing), all fillings I've had have been followed up with a line about no sticky food.

As for candles, most Japanese people don't wear strong perfume/cologne and there's not a big market for potpourri or smelly things like that so even if it's a nice gesture you'll probably just end up giving people a headache or making them feel sick unintentionally (odds are higher if they're old).

ihatefall
June 25th, 2014, 13:09
Yeah, I brought taffy when I came and it didn't go over well (that's the boxes that didn't melt on the way over). I was left with a lot of taffy (which would be awesome if I didn't hate it). Randomgirl is right about chewy and sticky foods (I got the same thing), all fillings I've had have been followed up with a line about no sticky food.

As for candles, most Japanese people don't wear strong perfume/cologne and there's not a big market for potpourri or smelly things like that so even if it's a nice gesture you'll probably just end up giving people a headache or making them feel sick unintentionally (odds are higher if they're old).

That is why I said the cookie one or any of the food candles. They just smell like baking.

Ini
June 25th, 2014, 14:09
Come again?

word
June 25th, 2014, 14:19
Ugh, I hate candles and incense and sh*t like that.

If you want to bring a candle, be sure to bring something that Japanese people will be comfortable with, such as "Burning Garbage," "Stale Urine," or "Pickled Tennis Shoe."

Shincantsen
June 25th, 2014, 23:48
Ugh, I hate candles and incense and sh*t like that.

If you want to bring a candle, be sure to bring something that Japanese people will be comfortable with, such as "Burning Garbage," "Stale Urine," or "Pickled Tennis Shoe."

"Subway Salaryman Beer Breath" "Whiff of Sewage from a Grate"

ihatefall
June 26th, 2014, 00:55
Ugh, I hate candles and incense and sh*t like that.

If you want to bring a candle, be sure to bring something that Japanese people will be comfortable with, such as "Burning Garbage," "Stale Urine," or "Pickled Tennis Shoe."

"Public restroom cleaned with nothing but a 3 year old mop and dirty water for 20 years"

sourdoughsushi
June 26th, 2014, 01:25
"Ollld peeeeople"


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Villebillie
June 26th, 2014, 07:13
I still have no clue what to bring. I'm from Kentucky, near the whole "Bourbon Trail" thing originally so everyone keeps encouraging me to bring booze. I keep reminding them there's a limit to how much booze you can bring. I mean the only thing we're known for is bourbon, horses, tobacco, and fried chicken, none of which is a very packable item.

uthinkimlost?
June 26th, 2014, 07:19
Bourbon balls might survive, or mint julep flavoured candies are likely to make it. (Yes, they make them.)

Mini, factory-made derby pies with a long shelf life would also do. (Just box them carefully.)

johnny
June 26th, 2014, 14:16
I still have no clue what to bring. I'm from Kentucky, near the whole "Bourbon Trail" thing originally so everyone keeps encouraging me to bring booze. I keep reminding them there's a limit to how much booze you can bring. I mean the only thing we're known for is bourbon, horses, tobacco, and fried chicken, none of which is a very packable item.

For omiyage, booze is not a great idea. You don't need to bring something that is specific to Kentucky. You can also bring something specific to your general region or even just America.

More than anything, as others have said before, you want something that can be easily shared in the workplace.

When I came here I brought maple cookies. They weren't individually wrapped, but we found a plate to put them on and told the staff to dig at their leisure. It seemed to go over well. It should be that simple.

When I first joined ITIL, someone even said that if you're really agonizing over this decision, just wait until you arrive in Japan and buy something after your first trip out of the city. I wasn't sure about that, but honestly, my omiyage from Fukuoka went over just as well as my Omiyage from Canada.

mrcharisma
June 26th, 2014, 14:35
If the recipient is teetotal or a recovering alky then gifting booze could get awkward.

Jiggit
June 26th, 2014, 14:37
There is no man who is ever dissatisfied with free alcohol.

webstaa
June 26th, 2014, 14:40
There is no man who is ever dissatisfied with free alcohol.

I got a bottle of apple 'champagne' from the school principal at our Christmas dinner during a gift exchange - he was kinda hurt that I didn't open it (it came in a heavy department store bag sealed with duct tape, inside of a bubble wrap insulation wrap sealed with duct tape, and then in one of those Japanese reusable 'gift bags.')

Certainly made me happy. And pleasantly drunk too afterwards.

Randomgirl
June 27th, 2014, 07:48
I am ordering boxes of maple cookies online and having them shipped to my residence there so they'll be waiting for me. Everyone will get a cookie on a canadian design (read: dollar store leftover from canada day) paper napkin. I figure that, judging from the omiyage stores in every major train station with omiyage from all over the country, I'm not meant to stress over it ;)

soh
June 27th, 2014, 09:04
You can just pick up some cookies or candies from the train stations or airport when you leave Tokyo for your placement.:redface:

Jiggit
June 27th, 2014, 09:07
You can just pick up some cookies or candies from the train stations or airport when you leave Tokyo for your placement.:redface:

The sad thing is your coworkers may well be more impressed by exotic Tokyo generic cookies than by anything actually from gaikoku. Gaikoku food is too sweet after all.

Antonath
June 27th, 2014, 09:10
You can bring them the famous Tokyo Banana.

word
June 27th, 2014, 10:44
I still have no clue what to bring. I'm from Kentucky, near the whole "Bourbon Trail" thing originally so everyone keeps encouraging me to bring booze. I keep reminding them there's a limit to how much booze you can bring. I mean the only thing we're known for is bourbon, horses, tobacco, and fried chicken, none of which is a very packable item.
There was an ALT from Kentucky I knew who brought some chocolate horse-arses; they proved quite popular. No idea where he got 'em.

Namisuke
June 27th, 2014, 14:52
You can buy maple cookies and maple syrup in Japan. I've found both at my local grocery. The problem with maple cookies is they aren't individually wrapped and will go stale FAST in summer if left out. Seriously, an hour later they'll soak up the humidity. You can try individually wrapping them in Daiso gift bags to keep them fresh and easy to put out if you like. I think that would be acceptable. Usually I put them out for Canada Day.

I gave small bottles of alcohol when I came. It was kind of dumb of me to gift it at school, but it was wrapped up and was luckily well-received. Ice wine or Canadian beer is my recommendation for alcohol as you can rarely find either here. Note that many Japanese people don't drink at all (allergy, can't handle it, don't like it, genetic issues, etc.). Otherwise, I make sweets for my schools. If you want to make Canadian sweets eventually, there are some tough ingredients to find. I haven't been able to find corn syrup or brown sugar easily. The stuff that looks brown is raw sugar. If you want to make Nanaimo Bars, bring Byrd's custard powder as the stuff they have here makes them taste totally different. Coconut and sprinkles are sold in small quantities, so buying bulk is a good idea and much cheaper. If you make muffins, bring a muffin pan or two. I've never seen them here. I can't recall if it is baking powder or soda that I have trouble finding. Ground ginger for gingerbread is also tougher to find sometimes. You could also make peanut butter cookies if you bring a big tub of it. Those usually aren't too sweet and taste like some peanut omiyage they have here.

Avoid bringing food that melts at all costs, because it will.

Ini
June 27th, 2014, 16:39
buy a tin of celebrations from the airport duty free. thats been my go to omiyage for the last few years.

therealwindycity
June 27th, 2014, 23:07
The sad thing is your coworkers may well be more impressed by exotic Tokyo generic cookies than by anything actually from gaikoku. Gaikoku food is too sweet after all.

いいいいいいいいいなあああああああああ

coop52
June 28th, 2014, 07:57
Found out there's now an Osaka banana, too. Guess you have to get Skytree cookies for that unique Tokyo-ness.

uthinkimlost?
June 28th, 2014, 09:16
Osaka Banana is vastly inferior.

Ini
June 28th, 2014, 09:23
take it to the gay thread

soh
June 29th, 2014, 15:27
I can't recall if it is baking powder or soda that I have trouble finding.
It's probably baking soda ... I found sodium bicarbonate next to kitchen cleaners at Daiso.

webstaa
June 30th, 2014, 12:29
Never had a problem finding baking soda or baking powder - both are available at my little inaka grocery - check by the starches and then the cake/baking aisle - if you're lucky it'll be in both places. Finding real bread flour is can be a pain - it seems to come and go.

Wasabi
July 20th, 2014, 21:23
I think I'm going to bring Twizzlers, as BJ's has individually wrapped cases of 100 for pretty cheap. My research shows that Twizzlers maybe be hard to find in Japan, but for those of you living there is this true? I'd hate to roll up with them and have it be readily available. My other option is ground coffee from Dunkin Donuts.

Ananasboat
July 20th, 2014, 21:29
I didn't see them, but you might get people who don't try them because they're chewy. Bad teeth and all that jazz.

Edit: ground coffee from Dunkin is less superior than Japanese ground coffee, and that's saying a ton.

Namisuke
July 21st, 2014, 15:22
Twizllers tend to sweat in hot weather. IF new JETs want to bring anything at all, DRY goods are best - cookies, crackers, etc. that are individually packaged. Otherwise, get stuff here! It's all the same concept.

Wasabi
July 21st, 2014, 23:38
I didn't see them, but you might get people who don't try them because they're chewy. Bad teeth and all that jazz.

Edit: ground coffee from Dunkin is less superior than Japanese ground coffee, and that's saying a ton.

Whoa, shots fired! I'm a New Englander and Dunkin is like a cult up here.

ffffff
July 22nd, 2014, 00:05
I think my gifts are still in my suitcase somewhere.

Ananasboat
July 22nd, 2014, 00:30
Whoa, shots fired! I'm a New Englander and Dunkin is like a cult up here.

I am also a new englander, and Dunkin coffee is watery and flavorless. Their pre-ground stuff you buy in the store is even more so. I just have taste.

jacqui
July 22nd, 2014, 03:16
Never had a problem finding baking soda or baking powder - both are available at my little inaka grocery - check by the starches and then the cake/baking aisle - if you're lucky it'll be in both places. Finding real bread flour is can be a pain - it seems to come and go.
Bread flour is just strong flour (強力粉), no? I've seen it everywhere.
Non-white bread flour, though, you'd probably have to go to Rakuten/one of dozens of online baking stores for that.

Wasabi
July 22nd, 2014, 05:13
I just have taste.

Yikes, sounds like someone is a bit cranky and hasn't had their morning cup of joe yet.

Thanks for the response, Namisuke! It's incredibly hard to find individually wrapped things that will endure the heat & travel process. I'll look a bit more for something else before I go. In the end, there's no pleasing everyone so I'll hope for the best!

Ananasboat
July 22nd, 2014, 06:23
Yikes, sounds like someone is a bit cranky and hasn't had their morning cup of joe yet.

Thanks for the response, Namisuke! It's incredibly hard to find individually wrapped things that will endure the heat & travel process. I'll look a bit more for something else before I go. In the end, there's no pleasing everyone so I'll hope for the best!

Not cranky, but it's just not good compared to local roast or small roast vendors.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
July 22nd, 2014, 06:53
I'm an old Englander, and I have no idea what any of you are talking about.

mothy
July 22nd, 2014, 09:09
Just further proof that New England is the Osaka of America.

Ananasboat
July 22nd, 2014, 09:35
If Tokyo is New York, Osaka is totally Boston. But those are the only four cities I've really been to, so I actually have no idea what I'm talking about.

mothy
July 22nd, 2014, 09:38
Boston is the Osaka of New England.

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 13:30
Everyone here is always saying that "osaka is dirty" blah blah blah...... So wouldn't that make New York Osaka and Boston Tokyo?!?

Boston is Kyoto.
It has a lot of history, is a smaller compact city, historic buildings, used to be the political capital but no longer is, etc.
Thus, the sister city relationship.


LA would be Osaka, if New York is Tokyo. Duh.

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 13:42
Whoa, shots fired! I'm a New Englander and Dunkin is like a cult up here.


I didn't see them, but you might get people who don't try them because they're chewy. Bad teeth and all that jazz.

Edit: ground coffee from Dunkin is less superior than Japanese ground coffee, and that's saying a ton.

DD is a good call, it's easy to give to the office so that they can all try it. What Ananasboat is missing, is that the omiyage doesn't have to be good or high quality, just something your area is known for. I don't think your co-workers are going to be thinking about the quality of the stupid crackers they bring back from "sight seeing location number 324"
DD isn't available here (but strangely is available in Korea.)

Anything from New England is fine:
Salt water taffy
Cape cod potato chips
Those weird lobster candy things you buy on the cape
Even VT/NH maple candy
Any NE brewed alcohols

I My Humble (but experienced) Opinion.


Edit :

While I agree that DD isn't good per se, I mean Cumberland farms has better coffee....but anyway, you can roll up with a pound from the Wired Puppy or ERC but there isn't going to be the chance they might see it in a movie in the future, etc. Plus DD is something EVERYONE drinks, not just the hip kids. (Warning Blanket statement ahead) Japanese people in general love that kind of stuff; to be the same, to fit in like everyone else. (Yeah yeah, I know you saw Fruits and love Yayoi Kusuma, but it's true.)

mothy
July 22nd, 2014, 14:41
Everyone here is always saying that "osaka is dirty" blah blah blah...... So wouldn't that make New York Osaka and Boston Tokyo?!?

Boston is Kyoto.
It has a lot of history, is a smaller compact city, historic buildings, used to be the political capital but no longer is, etc.
Thus, the sister city relationship.


LA would be Osaka, if New York is Tokyo. Duh.

Is LA in New England now? Nice try, but I remain the expert on comparing Osaka to things.

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 14:52
Mothy: normally I agree with you but you're wrong on this one. I see where you going, you think Osaka and Boston are both awful, but, sorry no dice this time.

Boston / Kyoto = conservative (loves tradtional clothing/ black , filled with basic bitches)

Osaka / LA = a little wild, clubs getting raided for drugs, loves super bleached hair and leopard print.

mothy
July 22nd, 2014, 14:54
Mothy: normally I agree with you but you're wrong on this one. I see where you going, you think Osaka and Boston are both awful, but, sorry no dice this time.

Boston / Kyoto = conservative (loves tradtional clothing/ black , filled with basic bitches)

Osaka / LA = a little wild, clubs getting raised for drugs, loves super bleached hair and leopard print.

Go learn your American geography before you argue with me. Again, LA IS NOT IN NEW ENGLAND!

Ini
July 22nd, 2014, 14:54
Kyoto = *insert boring overrated town of your choice
Tokyo = *insert large metropolis of your choice
Osaka = *insert large bowel movement of your choice

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 15:06
Kyoto = *insert boring overrated town of your choice
Tokyo = *insert large metropolis of your choice
Osaka = *insert large bowel movement of your choice

Exactly!

Kyoto = Boston

mothy
July 22nd, 2014, 15:23
You're really bad at comparing things to other things.

mothy
July 22nd, 2014, 15:23
Love you though.

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 15:29
I was really hoping LA's sister city was Osaka, but Nagoya?!?

Bi-Kun
July 22nd, 2014, 16:15
I was really hoping LA's sister city was Osaka, but Nagoya?!?

WHAT! Nagoya deserves better...

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 16:19
WHAT! Nagoya deserves better...

I feel like people who hate on LA have only been to Hollywood.


Prefect weather, hiking, snowboarding, great beaches and amazing food.

You're right Nagoya has all of that.
(Read: sarcasm)

greyjoy
July 22nd, 2014, 16:25
I feel like people who hate on LA have only been to Hollywood.


Prefect weather, hiking, snowboarding, great beaches and amazing food.

You're right Nagoya has all of that.
(Read: sarcasm)

From s Assessment of Los Angeles - YouTube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C0VFIKCjzl0#t=45)

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 16:44
Throwing in the hat, can't argue with Futurama......

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
July 22nd, 2014, 17:44
Cilantro, why do I see you everywhere now?

ihatefall
July 22nd, 2014, 19:18
Cilantro, why do I see you everywhere now?

Because it's delicious




Ok because Chipotle

Virgil
December 26th, 2014, 11:06
I have quite a few pecan trees at my house. They are about as local and close to home as I can get. I was thinking about just wrapping small packages of shelled pecans in cellophane. I have plenty and all it would cost me is a little time.

Not sure if they would like pecans or not. Anyone have any insight on that? From what I've read they are pretty expensive in Japan.

sharpinthefang
December 27th, 2014, 09:09
You would also have to look at import restrictions, I know in the states you cannot even bring in oranges or nuts. Best to check that one out.

Beer Baron
December 28th, 2014, 01:46
I wouldn't bother. Probably the best thing to do is to buy a range of individually wrapped snacks from your local japanese supermarket when its your birthday or something.
People do not expect presents when a new member of staff joins.

Virgil
December 28th, 2014, 03:02
I wouldn't bother. Probably the best thing to do is to buy a range of individually wrapped snacks from your local japanese supermarket when its your birthday or something.
People do not expect presents when a new member of staff joins.
This seems to be the general advice, and I'm going to heed it.

itsabird
January 5th, 2015, 15:58
I brought Slim Jims. Somone liked them becuse they went pretty fast....

sourdoughsushi
January 7th, 2015, 16:23
I brought Slim Jims. Somone liked them becuse they went pretty fast....
Just sent some of those for my Christmas haul, they're so cheap!

itsabird
January 9th, 2015, 16:18
Just sent some of those for my Christmas haul, they're so cheap!
And absolutely delicious if you're not worried about dieting or trying to bulk. Greasy spicy fatty goodness in a stick.

ambrosse
January 10th, 2015, 00:52
I brought Slim Jims. Somone liked them becuse they went pretty fast....

That's a really good idea! Although if I brought some over...it'd be difficult to not eat them myself...

Sakesake
January 12th, 2015, 18:14
Bring a big box of cookies, chocolates (though these might melt in the summer heat) or sweets that can be put out in the staff room and shared. It's definitely best if they are individually wrapped. Your colleagues will generally bring back something like this when they go on holiday somewhere and place one on each of their colleague's desks (if they are not there) or give them to them in person if they are there (accompanied with lots of bows someone else said). Don't bring individual gifts-it's awkward if you don't have enough-best to get something for the team.

JestersJ
January 13th, 2015, 02:46
I will tell you now after studying abroad, the biggest hit was reese's pieces or any kind of peanut butter chocolate. With the Japanese and with the foreigners in your area.

I brought little desert snow globes and keychains and stuff when I studied abroad. People get pretty excited when they learn you lived near cactus and desert lol

par92186
January 14th, 2015, 14:17
I will tell you now after studying abroad, the biggest hit was reese's pieces or any kind of peanut butter chocolate.

Honestly, stay away from anything chocolate that would melt. When I came this past August an ALT friend of mine bought a big bag of milk chocolates and the entire things turned to liquid.

Stick with the old faithfuls: anything individually wrapped, small, and won't melt.

Ini
January 14th, 2015, 14:51
Honestly, stay away from anything chocolate that would melt. When I came this past August an ALT friend of mine bought a big bag of milk chocolates and the entire things turned to liquid.

Stick with the old faithfuls: anything individually wrapped, small, and won't melt.

dead babies?

par92186
January 14th, 2015, 15:06
dead babies?

stop. you're making me hungry.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 14th, 2015, 15:18
Flight restricted item, too. No dice.

Ini
January 14th, 2015, 15:27
not if you smuggle them in your anus

PuddingHead
January 15th, 2015, 00:00
Of course you can bring babies. If they're under two it's usually free for domestic and about a $100 tax for international. Just say it's sleeping. No one will complain.

Virgil
January 15th, 2015, 00:15
I keep finding myself writing a response to this thread, only to decide against it and erase it all.

Ini
January 15th, 2015, 00:18
only to decide against it and erase it all.

can we please get off the topic of abortions and dead babies and get back to omiyage! jesus christ what is wrong with you people?

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 15th, 2015, 00:40
Agreed. Gods know, there should be someone to keep order around these parts...

Don't bring anything too sweet unless you plan on eating it all yourself.

Zolrak 22
January 15th, 2015, 00:43
I keep finding myself writing a response to this thread, only to decide against it and erase it all.
I've noticed. [emoji6]


*stalker ish music in the background *

(It's the people online Stream)

mothy
January 15th, 2015, 01:17
I brought [A BEAUTIFUL CAKE] and everyone loved it.

arcthemonkey
January 15th, 2015, 02:51
I brought a big bag of locally made salt water taffy, even knowing that I didn't have to bring anything (my five year pred said I needed to, for some reason...). My supervisor ate a root beer flavored one (didn't know I grabbed any of those?!) and acted like he'd been poisoned. It was a wonderful first day.