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KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 08:40
Hi,

This is my first post here, so be nice ;)

I have made up a whole lot of student centred curriculums for my schools (seeing students between 3 and 35 times per year). Would people like me to put them up here? I've already put them up on the official JET forums, although I've tidied them up a bit since then.

They're not 100% student centred, since given the low number of times I can see each class, I've had to compromise a bit. I'm well aware of their limitations, but any discussion here I'm sure would be fine, to help other ALTs implement them.

So yes, would you guys like me to put them up? Would you find them useful?

therealwindycity
April 11th, 2014, 08:43
I would be happy to. I'm always looking for new ES ideas!

Antonath
April 11th, 2014, 08:57
Go for it! There may be a problem with file sizes, so shout if you run into trouble.

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 13:37
Ok, I'll probably upload some when I get back to my base school later this afternoon.

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 15:55
Ok, hopefully this works.
Still working on my Year 5s and 6s combined class curriculum. Please read the "teaching in a student centred way" first.
If you find any mistakes, please let me know. Also, any discussion about these is welcome.

EDIT: removed previous versions, see OP for new versions.

Gizmotech
April 11th, 2014, 16:23
Right on Kikki.

therealwindycity
April 11th, 2014, 16:54
Thank you for sharing! These should give me some ideas for the semester

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 18:09
????????????????????

good effort.......

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 18:54
????????????????????

good effort.......


Like I said, I am aware of the limitations of these plans, but due to the limited numbers of lessons, I had to make some choices about what to prioritise. I'm sure you will make different choices depending on your situation.

I think a lot of ALTs don't really think very hard about how the grammar points they teach actually link up, or how what they teach gives students a sense of how English fits together. Given that a lot of students actually come into elementary schools already knowing quite a lot of English words, either from manga, or anime, or gairaigo, I wanted to prioritise giving them a feel for how the grammar is manipulated in different ways, while also giving them space to choose what vocab they want to use to make it something they actually want to say, rather than a boring drill.

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 19:02
is there any reason why each grade is doing the same basic thing? what happens next year? do they just repeat everything?
is there any reason why its formatted in one long meandering stream of consciousness? could you not do 1 lesson on 1 page?
whats the thinking behind doing something as complicated as "people who want" week 1, "do you want" week 2 and finally "I want" week 3? wouldn't it be easier to introduce "want" with "i want" in the beginning?
What are the aims of each class? how do you evaluate the students?
why do numbers, wait a month then do time? wouldnt it be better to do them together?
why do "want to go" then wait a month before doing "want to be" wouldnt it be easier to do them together?
why
why
why

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 19:21
Haha, yes, nice questions.

What do you mean, "is there any reason why each grade is doing the same basic thing? what happens next year? do they just repeat everything?"? Each year focusses on a different concept. If you're talking about the phonics, this is obviously for the first year of introduction. In subsequent years, you should move on to whatever's next. For example if the Year 1s' last lesson was LWVF, then their first lesson as Year 2s should be YXRZ, not AEIOU.

Why is it formatted the way it is? To save paper. I've printed these out, because I prefer things on paper. Sorry that it's not as easy for you to see. But since it's a .doc, you can easily just add in "enters" so that each lesson begins on a new page.

"People who want" is actually not complicated at all. My ichinenseis who have had no lessons in English can always tell me that "people who like red" means that aka ga suki na hito should change seats. Seriously. They get it first time, every time. And yes, after the first maybe, 5 students for ichinensei, you don't even have to prompt them. These aren't super intelligent kids, this is actually at my worst school, which has had a tonne of problems in the past.

Secondly, if you have time after fruit basket and dictation (which all my students love, lol), you can certainly add in a ball toss, or basketball with "I want __" But the reason that I do the question first is because kids like to ask questions, and I think they will feel like they have achieved more than just if they could only say the answer.

The aims of each year of the plan is that they should be familiar with the concepts of "like" "can" "want" and "have" and sub consciously have a feel for how English grammar fits together. The aims of each class are that they are familiar with the sounds of English letters, and how they fit together to create words. I strongly believe that if students can get to grips with phonics in elementary, they will be very well placed to deal with the pressures of JHS/SHS English.

Why do numbers, wait and then do time? Because every time students have to recall something, it strengthens their memory of that piece of information. Counting and time are slightly different concepts, and therefore approaching numbers after a period, and from a slightly different angle, as it were, will strengthen both pieces of information.

If it helps, I have studied language teaching at university, and also had an education major look over these plans too. Not to shut down discussion of them or anything, but simply to let you know where I'm coming from :)

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 19:45
i would of thought doing something more challenging with the 6th grade than playing fruit basket would help them deal with the pressures of jhs/shs..... You are doing the same activities with each grade in almost every year. by the 5rd grade do you think they are going to be motivated to play ball toss and fruit basket for the hundredth time?

there is almost no review outside of your bizarre phonics obsession. you do the numbers 1-31 once. dont review it but go straight into ordinal numbers the next week then never mention numbers until time. In this section you still dont review numbers and just expect them to remember what they did months ago for 10 minutes squeezed in-between one of your phonics rants (not to mention number 32-59, what happened to them?).

The aims of having a familiarity with the way English sounds its good but there seems to be a distinct lack of communication going on in the class other than in these ball toss games. Do they kids ever have to talk to each other/interview people/use english outside of playing games?


based on the amount of phonics at work here I'm going to go out on a limb and say you are american

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 19:56
Haha, nope, you are way off, I am nowhere near america.

Actually there is a space to review vocab every lesson, in the "what's this?" section.

Also, this is for the FIRST year of implementation. Later on in the year, when I actually have some time, I will be putting together a curriculum for successive years for my successor.

But both good points that I hadn't been clear about before!

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 20:12
so "whats this?" is the same every time? how many weeks before that gets boring?

How do the lessons start and finish?

Whats the HRTs reaction to their role? what happens when they cant/wont join in with speaking and writing English?

Under "dictation" do you ever teach them the correct way to write the letters or can they just scribble anything they want down?

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 20:26
What's this isn't the same necessarily. But how I normally do it in my classes is to either a) pull the flashcard slowly out of an envelope, b) have a bag with a plastic model or similar of the vocab and the student has to stick their hand in and guess what it is, c) gesture the vocab, or d) do a 3 hint quiz type of thing.

The lessons start with me saying good morning/ good afternoon, students repeat, I ask how they are, they all answer "I'm __, and you?" I answer then ask the HRT. If I hear any student say "fine" I do it again. Not in a mean way, but I want them to actually answer how they are, as opposed to just rote repeating "I'mfinethankyouandyou" Then we go straight into the first activity. For Year 1s, we'll go through "ureshikattara?" "I'm happy" "nemukattara?" "I'm sleepy" etc each time, til I think we're getting the hang of it. It doesn't take long. 2-3 mins, tops.

Lessons finish generally when the bell goes, and I'll say, in English "that's all for today, thank you! [students say "thank you!], see you! [students say "see you"], goodbye! [good bye]" just because that's what they were used to when I got here, and I don't see much reason to change it.

I actually don't have trouble with any of my HRTs. They're all perfectly happy to either stand at the back of the class (and since I actually have a lot of experience teaching, I'm not bothered by leading the class), or they help me demonstrate stuff, or whatever. I would prefer it if it were more of a team teaching situation I think, but most of my HRTs are very shy about English, though very willing to help out when asked. I think it's better if they're not confident with English. It gives a good model for the kids, I think, because they can see that the HRT is trying, and they usually actually try to teach the HRT what to do. I will agree that I am quite lucky with my HRTs at the moment. I have also photocopied a huge thing for them all on the theory of student centred lessons and whatnot, so they can understand where I'm coming from.

For dictation, I write the letters up on the board for them. I want them to relax and pay attention to the sounds and connect that to the written form, rather than focus on trying to recall a letter from memory. That will happen anyway as the year(s) go on.

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 20:36
How do you end the classes? any time for student reflection?

shouldn't you put things like introductions and farewells in the lesson plan if you are intending to leave them for other people to follow?

do you write the letters in the correct stroke order? (the one set out in the JHS penmanship books)

you and the HRT might not mind you leading the class but thats a bit small minded isnt it? what happens in a year when you leave? shouldn't you be encouraging the the HRT to lead the class rather than be your assistant? What happens during demonstration lessons? HRT cant really write a report on "their lesson" if you are doing everything

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 20:43
Sorry, I forgot, someone mentioned about interview games. Yes I actually have used them quite a bit too. I think I will have some spaces in my lessons where I can use them, most lessons are budgeted for 40 mins, because not everyone has good class control, or easy to control classes, so I think I will be able to add them in again. Cheers!

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 20:51
Some of my schools have a sheet where students write their thoughts on each lesson. It then gets marked though, which I think defeats the purpose. I think most of my students are not at the age where that would be helpful.

As for writing that on the lesson plans, I don't think I need to. I will be doing a big write up for my successor anyway for when they come and I've always planned to put things like that in there instead.

This isn't a hard an fast thing, and I would expect each ALT to adapt anything they want to use out of these to their particular students. It's simply detailed notes about what I do in my classes.

Observation lessons where it's the HRT being observed, and not me? I've had one of those in my nearly 4 years here. And that HRT wrote the plan, and was the main teacher. Otherwise, any observation lessons have been my CO looking at me, and not necessarily being focussed on the HRT.

As for the writing. I write letters in the correct order. Ie, the one I learnt as a kid. Haha. I don't teach the kids stroke order, but they always watch me writing things on the board. I don't think it's necessary to drill that kind of thing into them. I really don't see the point.

Lesson finish stuff I answered when I edited my previous post.

Gizmotech
April 11th, 2014, 20:53
Can I chime in on one part, which was something I was considering recently with my classes. Ini is sorta right that if we're designing content like this, we really should be passing this information on to our coworkers as well as our successors and colleagues.

Given how much thought you've put into this, an english (first) HRT guide to go with it might not be a bad idea.

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 20:57
Lol, I will be training my HRTs over this term to deal with a new ALT who (most likely) won't know how to teach when they get here. I don't plan to let my hard work over the years go to waste.

These plans will also be gradually translated into basic Japanese, which, along with all the stuff I've already given my HRTs, should enable them to have the confidence to take over when I'm gone.

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 21:01
you say its not "hard an fast" but if the other ALT decides to drop phonics your lessons are essentially worthless because all you are left with is a 10-15min slot where all you do is play the same 3-5 games each week but just swap out the vocab.

You might not see the point of stroke order but unfortunately Japan does. You say you've been here 4 years so I'm surprised you haven't worked out by now that in Japan being a good English teacher has very little to do with teaching people how to speak English.

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 21:20
Well, I know there are deep, deep flaws in the way English is taught in Japan. They approach it more like Latin for a start, rather than as a living language. If the next ALT decides to drop phonics, well, it's no good crying over spilt milk. There will literally be nothing I can do about it. But I hope that they can see the value in it. Some of my year 6 classes, at a school where I actually got the required number of lessons, were actually reading quite big words in English, and they were doing interview games where I just wrote the questions in English, with no Japanese or pictures, and they did really well with them. I hope that the ALT who got those students at JHS can be converted to the value of this approach, and can help encourage the new ALT to keep up with the phonics.

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 21:50
you'd have more luck involving the HRTs more and establish a culture of teaching phonics at the school. also that way the HRT could take the lesson plans to their new schools when they transfer. Leave the ALTs out of it. thats like trying to improve English education by polishing the CD player.

KIKKI.K
April 11th, 2014, 22:24
I wouldn't get any of my HRTs to do the phonics bits. Their pronunciation is uniformly awful. Even my one JTE who went to university in the US, and is pretty fluent says she can't hear the difference between the vowels. So, yeah.

In my city, it seems to be the culture that English lessons are up to the ALTs to take care of. It's both a good and bad thing. I did give all the HRTs a that photocopy last term, and asked them to take a copy with them to their new schools, though I don't know how many did. I think younger HRTs are more interested in this kind of thing, older ones are a bit too beaten down by the system. When I asked for feedback about the student centred stuff I photocopied for them, the reaction was always positive, and they seemed really enthusiastic about it though, so, we'll see. I think any lasting change would have to come from within the individual HRT anyway.

Ini
April 11th, 2014, 22:27
wait. you gave HRTs who dont speak english 2 pages of text on student centred learning written in English and you expected them to do anything with it other than smile politely then throw it in the bin?

KIKKI.K
April 12th, 2014, 08:44
No, I gave them over 100 pages on student centred theory and application.

Ini
April 12th, 2014, 09:12
Why do you think this is something new? Teachers study jidouchushinshugi and the new education movement at university. In japanese. What were you hoping? A 45 year old ES teacher with no grasp of the English language is going to sit down and read 100 pages of theory written in technical English?

KIKKI.K
April 12th, 2014, 09:24
Sorry, I forgot to say it was written in JAPANESE.

Seriously, though, mate, I'm losing my patience with you.

Ini
April 12th, 2014, 09:38
You need to learn patience if you're going to be a teacher.

Why dont you take you plans to the BOE? if you want to instigate change in your town then taking your plans to the BOE will serve a greater purpose than posting some poorly formatted lesson plans on ITIL, spamming overworked teachers with photocopied textbooks and relying on the good will of JHS ALTs. Write up a concise proposal, arrange a demonstration class, invite members of the BOE, JHS JTEs, ES principals and HRTs.

KIKKI.K
April 12th, 2014, 09:54
I have already given them to the BoE. I have already shown them videos of my classes, on top of what they've already seen every year when the observe us. I don't know why you are engaging in such a hostile way. Really what goes on between my BoE, HRTs and me is really nothing to do with what I put up here.

The purpose of putting these up here was to give people ideas about student centred lesson planning and thinking about where their curriculum was going. In my prefecture, a *lot* of ALTs really want to do student centred lessons, but don't actually have the foggiest idea of what that actually means. These should give them some idea, which is why I put them up. You'll notice I said to read the explanation on student centred teaching first. And I don't expect that any one reading them will implement them "as is." I also CLEARLY stated they are not 100% student centred because of limitations in lesson numbers, lack of textbook, etc.

What's this about "if you're going to be a teacher"? Mate, seriously? I've already said I'm leaving this job in July. Why on earth would you think I would continue teaching after that? I have plenty of patience for those who deserve it, you, however, are an adult, I hope, and veering very close to the territory of "troll." Whether you mean to come across that way, I don't know. But you've cluttered this thread with an awful lot of completely unnecessary posts.

Seriously, I don't know what point you're trying to prove here. I really don't. But all that you've done is make me glad that I stayed away from ITIL all these years.

Ini
April 12th, 2014, 10:07
cluttered

Coming from the author of those lesson plans I'd say people in glass houses shouldn't throw stones.

So they are not meant to be implemented "as is" because of the gapping holes in them and they are not 100% student centred? couldn't you of just written a brief intro to student centred learning and put one "lesson plan" up as an example? You didn't say in the first post that they weren't intended to be implemented as is. If you put stuff like that up on a site like this then all that will happen is some FOB ALT will copy them and you are left with schools of children playing the ball toss game and fruit basket every lesson for 1-5 years. Throw karuta in there and you have the holy trinity of cliched ES lessons.

KIKKI.K
April 12th, 2014, 10:13
I have already addressed those concerns in previous posts.

Ini
April 12th, 2014, 10:21
well you haven't really, half the stuff I have questioned you about you have just glossed over, chosen to ignore or said "I plan to get to that in the future"

word
April 12th, 2014, 11:59
Hmm Ini, you're raising some good questions, but the manner in which you're delivering this commentary is not particularly helpful or polite. I think you made your point. I'm not gonna lock this thread just yet, but why don't we all step away from it for a bit and take a breather? Might be good for everyone.

Namisuke
April 23rd, 2014, 12:02
Awesome! I am going to steal these and put them in my materials collection, even though I'm a SHS teacher :) I like the inclusion of the write-up of student-centered learning practices. I agree about games - they need to be connected with the objectives/goals of the class. I want to delve deeper in my own games to make them more thought-provoking/challenging. There are a lot of super fun, but not as educational, games out there that would be fantastic if schools here implemented morning exercise/dance/movement as it's been proven to help students focus better and improve their social emotional learning.

I think the plans are well-done and have sections on theory and what the teachers should be doing. One thing I've been trying to improve on my formal lesson plans is to include assessment of outcome achievement. I want to include lessons that have students self-assess and notes on evidence of learning. Self-assessment can improve intrinsic motivation an assure student-centered learning. It can even be done with ES students with questioning them. "What was easiest? What was difficult? Can you think of a way to make the difficult thing easy? What did your partner do well? What do you want to do better?" I'm going to implement little check-box evaluations with my SHS students to evaluate ability and strengthen character. Hope it works!

Thanks for your hard work! It's nice to see other teachers who care about professional development and who are willing to share their work!

KIKKI.K
April 23rd, 2014, 12:58
Thanks Nami! I know they're far from perfect, but I really wanted to get something done to show people in time for the new school year.

I think one reason I'm a bit hesitant to use self-assessment cards for my classes is that so many schools have me teach the Years 1-4s so few times a year. I can easily see the situation happening where my students have a great lesson, and get really happy about their English, and are super excited for the next class, and they fill out the form etc, reinforcing their excitment for the next class, only to find out that their next English lesson isn't for another month, or they have English only once a term. And when they have the feeling "omg I can do this, I want more, more, more!!" but have to wait so long til the next class, I feel like they will feel incredibly defeated anf frustrated, and I think it's likely that that feeling, if it's too strong, will come out either in their normal classes, or be directed towards English class, and I don't want that to happen. Maybe I'm overthinking it? But I have had that experience. I had a 3nensei class at one of my schools, and the students thought it was the best, and they were so excited about English, and they kept pestering the teacher for when their next English class would be, and she finally gave in told them it wasn't until the middle of the next term, and that class' attitude just totally deflated, and they were never the same.

Ini, I'm sorry that you find it so hard to believe that other schools don't use furikaeri sheets. Clearly you're just lucky.

Ini
April 23rd, 2014, 12:58
if you just google 振り返りカード you can find 100s of research projects on elementary foreign language activities. Self assessment is somewhat essential as its the only form of assessment currently allowed.

Ini
April 23rd, 2014, 13:09
I think one reason I'm a bit hesitant to use self-assessment cards for my classes is that so many schools have me teach the Years 1-4s so few times a year. I can easily see the situation happening where my students have a great lesson, and get really happy about their English, and are super excited for the next class, and they fill out the form etc, reinforcing their excitment for the next class, only to find out that their next English lesson isn't for another month, or they have English only once a term. And when they have the feeling "omg I can do this, I want more, more, more!!" but have to wait so long til the next class, I feel like they will feel incredibly defeated anf frustrated, and I think it's likely that that feeling, if it's too strong, will come out either in their normal classes, or be directed towards English class, and I don't want that to happen. Maybe I'm overthinking it? But I have had that experience. I had a 3nensei class at one of my schools, and the students thought it was the best, and they were so excited about English, and they kept pestering the teacher for when their next English class would be, and she finally gave in told them it wasn't until the middle of the next term, and that class' attitude just totally deflated, and they were never the same.

What do you do with the 1-4 years outside of their classes? Also if you only see the students once a term shouldn't you make the lessons more self contained?

KIKKI.K
April 23rd, 2014, 14:34
I have more than one school. I go to a different school every day. If I see students only once a term, it's usually at my really big schools, so days when I go to that school I am usually scheduled to teach the Year 5s and 6s, and any spare periods will be scheduled with the younger years.

Should I make them more self contained? No. Lol. I don't think there's anything wrong with exploring the theme of "like" when you only have 3 lessons a year. What would 3 self contained lessons look like? Hello, my name is __/ Colours/ Animals? What's the point of that? Don't you find that it's frustrating for your students to spend so many years studying English, yet not be able to do anything more than spit various nouns at you? Why should I spend time "teaching" my students the names of colours, when most arrive at elemenary school already knowing them. Sounds like a waste of a lesson if you ask me. With so few lessons across the years at 2 of my schools (the 3-6 and the 5-10 plans) I decided to prioritise getting them to subconsciously have a feel for English grammar and how it might fit together. Of course, with so few lessons, it will be nothing more than a feeling, though maybe some brighter sparks will start to consciously put things together. But I'm ok with that. Much better, I think, than 3 lessons of vocab they already know, and them ending up with the feeling they can't do anything with English. That's why all of the games can be very flexible with the vocab. If all your students already know the colours, you can use some colour cards, while adding in new animals they don't know, or sports, or anything really. The colour cards will give them a feeling of "oh yeah I know this!" and the unknowns help them to extend their language. So there's a bit of safety and a bit of reaching each lesson.

Ini, if you have geniune questions, I'm more than happy to answer them, but if you stray too close to trolling, I will ignore your posts.

Ini
April 23rd, 2014, 14:57
Years 1-4 are not supposed to study English. At that age the number 1 priority is they have a good time. Working too much on grammar and assuming "most already know that" means you are rewarding the kids who go to eikaiwa/juku/have parents who encourage them to study english. If you get 10 kids who go to juku feeling good about themselves and desperate to study more but 5 kids who have never studied English before feeling like the lesson went over their head then the lesson is a massive failure in the eyes of MEXT.

Jiggit
April 23rd, 2014, 15:11
Ini, if you have geniune questions, I'm more than happy to answer them, but if you stray too close to trolling, I will ignore your posts.

If there are problems with your plans then pointing them out is not trolling. We appreciate you posting your lesson plans here but equally people need to know the potential problems with them rather than just blindly imitating them.

This isn't officials. People are allowed to disagree with you.

Namisuke
April 23rd, 2014, 15:12
It would be unfortunate for a productive conversation about teaching to get locked. A good dialogue about teaching should be safe for people to reveal their concerns, demonstrate care, and avoid blame and judgement.

I hear ya with teaching multiple classes with large gap periods. Although my gaps are only 2-4 weeks apart, that's still quite big if you want to integrate assessment and use it as a motivational tool. I really hope that some attention is given by MEXT to team-teaching practices. Team-teaching requires more planning time, but the results are studied to be much more effective than one teacher. My goal as an ALT given by my JTEs was just to make learning fun, and "anything is okay." I want to experiment with self-assessment regardless of only having a few classes left with my students before I return to Canada. I would love to have them thinking about their learning.

i like seeing how other teachers plan. Maybe more people would like to share their lesson plans. I'll have to spend some time searching here to see what's available. One problem I always run into is the short class times in Japan for SHS. It's tough to plan a lesson that requires making speeches, delivering speeches, and then the evaluation. Because I have blocks of time between classes, many things I would like to do become too troublesome. I'll have to think of a solution...

therealwindycity
April 23rd, 2014, 15:19
If there are problems with your plans then pointing them out is not trolling. We appreciate you posting your lesson plans here but equally people need to know the potential problems with them rather than just blindly imitating them.

This isn't officials. People are allowed to disagree with you.

This is true, but as always, just a reminder asking people to be civil with their criticisms, at least outside the lounge.

KIKKI.K
April 23rd, 2014, 15:20
I'm not working on grammar at all. But I am exploring different ways to use, for example, "like". I think you really have completely misunderstood my methods and lesson plans.

I'd also like to point out that my lessons (yes, the ones I've put up, though I do tailor them to each class and school as needed, adding in extra games or activities if we have time) are very fun and engaging for my students. I don't know anything about your schools, or how you teach, because you've spent your entire time attacking me, without reference to your own experiences, but these lessons have gone down a treat for nearly a year now. The students are still as *engaged* in the lessons as the were when I began them, with no effort at all on my part. I teach at one of the biggest elementaries in my city, which has had many problems in the past with student behaviour, and indeed still has a desk throwing student around (thankfully just one at the moment), and I teach at some of the smallest schools in my city as well. So I can say it's not just because I got "good" schools that these plans work. They work because they tap into what actually engages students with the material in the first place.

It's up to each school individually if they want to devote any time to English. I think they normally take it from general studies or comprehensive studies or something like that. When I arrived in my city, not only was there a BoE created curriculum for years 1-6, but we were expected to teach the Year 1s and 2s 15 times a year, Years 3 and 4 25 times a year, and the Years 5 and 6s 35 times a year. And this was from *before* MEXT decided that the Year 5s and 6s had a required number of English lessons. ESID really.

KIKKI.K
April 23rd, 2014, 15:23
If there are problems with your plans then pointing them out is not trolling. We appreciate you posting your lesson plans here but equally people need to know the potential problems with them rather than just blindly imitating them.

This isn't officials. People are allowed to disagree with you.

I'm prefectly happy for people to disagree with me, I would welcome a genuine discussion because it will help other ALTs around Japan develop their own teaching skills and lesson planning. If you read back over the thread, I'm sure you will see what I was talking about, re straying close to trolling.

Jiggit
April 23rd, 2014, 15:41
I'm prefectly happy for people to disagree with me, I would welcome a genuine discussion because it will help other ALTs around Japan develop their own teaching skills and lesson planning. If you read back over the thread, I'm sure you will see what I was talking about, re straying close to trolling.

I just did so. First of all, I'm not trying to have a go at you personally or scare anyone away from posting lesson plans. Hell, I don't even know if his criticisms are right or whether your lesson plans are decent or not; I don't teach ES.

But he's never criticised you in a way that wasn't directly related to your lesson plans and furthermore you really have glossed over most of what he's said. "Trolling" is saying something deliberately false to try and generate an angry response. It doesn't mean "phrasing your opinion in a slightly aggressive way". I really don't see any trolling or anything approaching it going on in this thread, except maybe where he asks if you're American for doing so much phonics.


I'd also like to point out that my lessons (yes, the ones I've put up, though I do tailor them to each class and school as needed, adding in extra games or activities if we have time) are very fun and engaging for my students.

Saying that your lessons are fun and engaging is fine. But you're doing more than just saying "this is what I do at ES and it's fun and engaging", you're claiming a lot more than that.


I don't know anything about your schools, or how you teach, because you've spent your entire time attacking me,

Again, he's not been attacking you, he's been attacking your plans. He's simply done so in a way that isn't mollycoddling. If he disagrees so strongly then there's no reason not to say so and if you disagree with his criticism equally as strongly then explain your counter-argument.



these lessons have gone down a treat for nearly a year now.

Doesn't necessarily make them good lessons. I could make lessons that kids enjoy every single time, that doesn't mean they're learning anything or doing anything meaningful/useful. If you just want the students have fun and use English, that's fine. Just doing that is fine, that's what ALTs should be doing. But with these teaching plans you're making a lot of claims that you haven't really defended. And if you're going to claim that these plans should be used by other ALTs too then the criticism needs to stay on this thread, whether you reply to it or not.

Again, I have nothing against you personally, just talking about the contents of this thread.

Ini
April 23rd, 2014, 16:26
If you dont do any form of assessment how do you know all the students are having fun and are engaged? Lots of ALTs are good at remembering the kids who go to juku sticking their hand up in the air and shouting out the answers but seem to have selective blindness when it comes to fat little tanaka sat at the back of class looking bored.

KIKKI.K
April 23rd, 2014, 16:27
Nami, here is a list of activities with explanations you might find useful in SHS. A lot of them won't work for ES or large classes, so I just take the ones I can use.

Jiggit and Ini, I'll get back to you guys since I don't have time to reply now.

Ini
April 23rd, 2014, 16:55
Where?

Gizmotech
April 23rd, 2014, 19:39
Kikki check that the attachment was put into the post. I don't see anything new on the main post or here.

KIKKI.K
April 23rd, 2014, 19:47
Sorry, I must have forgotten to paste it in my rush.

http://api.ning.com/files/XhIuwGzBQYNBAAi8YNd4s-0ikNuFswrJu34RbDRbA-V4WvEQWmzh2pbnrqFCnurEpdeJH6vWqs6GXG5YUG3LMJHC2WFusLiE/100GamesTeachingEnglishtoChildreninAsia.pdf

Gizmotech
April 23rd, 2014, 20:06
You should have upload privilege if you want to attach to your post.

KIKKI.K
April 23rd, 2014, 20:14
I think it's ok as a link. Or do you think it's better for me to upload it?

Gizmotech
April 23rd, 2014, 23:18
Nah, it's okay as a link. I'm just telling you that you should have attachment privileges here if you want to upload it or not.

If it makes you feel better, ITIL is paid for at least the next two years and isn't going anywhere, where as your upload host might just up and disappear :P

KIKKI.K
April 24th, 2014, 07:36
Oh, lol, it's not actually my document, it's a pdf I found online.

Namisuke
April 24th, 2014, 08:33
Cool, thanks for the list! When I have English club parties, we do a lot of mini games. One they love is where one kid leaves the room an changes something about themselves, comes back, and we have to guess what it is. It is like the one in this list where the kids change the room.

Sometimes if I have extra time in my lower level/at-risk school, I teach them games like heads up, 7-up. That school is less about academics and more about social-emotional learning, so in that case, these are good for lessons (in an emergency activity binder is good too).

A merit of some non-educational games is to spend a little time interacting with students casually. It's been studied that talking to students individually about something not related to the lesson once per class can increase student motivation, confidence, help discouraged students succeed, and help students feel an adult cares about them (very important). Sometimes games give us the chance to talk and rotate more. A lot of people try to write games off completely, but if used with thought, they can be quite beneficial.

it would be interesting to see everyone teach since everyone has such diverse ideas about pedagogy!

KIKKI.K
May 16th, 2014, 15:22
Ok, let's see.

First, Ini. I know my students are engaged by watching their faces. I know which ones go to eikaiwas and I would never take their level of English or engagement as solely indicative of whether or not the lessons are doing what they should or not. I always look at the whole class, and how every student is coping/engaging to decide that. Sorry that you've only ever worked with idiots who don't know how to teach, and this forms your opinion of the rest of us.

Jiggit. Lol, when I say "going down a treat" I mean they've been doing what they're supposed to do. I'm not sure which claims you mean when you say I haven't defended them. If you want to be more specific, I will try to address them better. One thing that this has taught me is that my instructions posted with the lessons were not clear enough. I have a lot of teaching experience outside of JET that I use in every lesson that I should really write down in the notes, lol.

As for my belief in the importance of phonics, I come from a country where we used to be taught to read by sounding the words out. Our reading scores were quite high compared to other OECD countries. Then they decided to stop that, and adopt a whole word reading strategy approach, and our reading scores subsequently dropped quite a bit. Hence I really believe that even for native speakers, and even with English's messed up spelling, developing a basic understanding of the sounds the consonants make, and the range of sounds the vowels make, is really important for learning English. Just my opinion, but whatever.

I'm really busy packing up and getting things ready for the new ALT, but I'll try to respond to anything raised on this thread.

Jiggit
May 16th, 2014, 17:46
Jiggit. Lol, when I say "going down a treat" I mean they've been doing what they're supposed to do.

You're missing the point. Students listening and doing what you tell them to do doesn't mean anything if the activities themselves aren't helping them at all. I mean I could make a lesson that was just playing games for 45 minutes (which I swear some people do) and have 100% of students paying attention and enjoying themselves, but it doesn't mean anything if the game is unrelated to their English education.

Now I'm not saying you're doing that but "students pay attention/enjoy themselves" is a secondary goal. It's something you should strive to do, but it should never be the goal of the lesson. Enjoyment/willing participation is a means that helps you achieve the end, the end being the actual education goals of your class. Too many ALTs completely miss sight of that and just try and make kids have fun and pat themselves on the back when they devise something that entertains them for the entire class, regardless of how little value the actual activity/game may have had.


I'm not sure which claims you mean when you say I haven't defended them. If you want to be more specific, I will try to address them better.

I mean the dozens of criticisms Ini posted that you ignored or brushed aside without addressing properly. Like I said, I don't know if he's right, but if he were wrong then surely you could explain why?

KIKKI.K
May 20th, 2014, 13:54
I think I answered all his criticisms adequately. Please direct me to the ones you think I didn't.

jwkelley
May 30th, 2014, 11:31
How many of us have actually ever taught with other ALTs enough to actually judge their ability?

Ini
May 30th, 2014, 11:37
I've been teaching with different alt+hrt/jte pairs for the last 4 years......

jwkelley
May 30th, 2014, 11:59
How many times is that with another ALT?

The only way i have ever been able to judge someones teaching ability was to an assistant in a class they led. I did that a lot in Korea, but in Japan I rarely if ever do that.

Ini
May 30th, 2014, 12:00
95% of the time

Jiggit
May 30th, 2014, 12:01
Wait you team teach with ALTs? Oh god that explains so much.

What is your actual job btw?

Ini
May 30th, 2014, 12:06
3727

jwkelley
May 30th, 2014, 14:00
You would make a good ALT consultant.

KIKKI.K
June 17th, 2014, 15:20
Ok, here are some of the new plans I have been working on based on feedback I've received.

coop52
June 17th, 2014, 16:23
It might be a good idea to put more detailed instructions for each of the games. And what is the HRT supposed to be doing? What vocab are you having the kids learn? It'd be a good idea to have a list for what words the kids should be practicing each lesson and what words they're reviewing.

Also, why are you using Japanese to prompt the kids? Even little 1st graders would probably get what you mean if you show pictures or mime or something. Leave speaking Japanese to the HRT.

I'd also have another look at the games to make sure you aren't doing the same ones over and over and that they're actually connected to the lesson content. Without instructions for how to play the games, I can't really tell how they're supposed to be using the content.

Namisuke
June 17th, 2014, 17:10
I think this is a good categorization of activities for learning points.

The way I see student-centered learning is to start planning with the objective first, and then think of proof of how you will know that objective has been met by the students. The class will revolve around getting that proof.

The next thing I do is plan for how I will get the proof. Will it be in writing? Speech? Will the assessment be objective or subjective? It's good to make activities that get concrete proof as much as possible.

What are the teachers doing? What are the students doing? Students should bear a lot of responsibility to have student-centered lessons. They take more time, but creating some routines and having practice makes them quicker down the line and better thinkers. If there are things the students can do every day, let them do it (get them to take turns to ask about the weather and date to the class every day, for example).

Although I can't quite say these plans are student-centered, I think it's good you're really thinking about your teaching. The more research I do on teaching, the more I wanna throw my old ideas out the window...lol It takes a really strong will to be open to criticism to get better. I'm glad you're sharing, especially in such an environment as ITIL ;)

I'm in also glad you're planning classes that could make English enjoyable to learn, which is state in all of the curriculum objectives that MEXT has right now. I'm gonna nab your list to combine what I have going :)

KIKKI.K
June 17th, 2014, 17:36
It might be a good idea to put more detailed instructions for each of the games. And what is the HRT supposed to be doing? What vocab are you having the kids learn? It'd be a good idea to have a list for what words the kids should be practicing each lesson and what words they're reviewing.

Also, why are you using Japanese to prompt the kids? Even little 1st graders would probably get what you mean if you show pictures or mime or something. Leave speaking Japanese to the HRT.

I'd also have another look at the games to make sure you aren't doing the same ones over and over and that they're actually connected to the lesson content. Without instructions for how to play the games, I can't really tell how they're supposed to be using the content.

Coop, there's a handout to go with these with all the games explanations on them. For reference for the moment, you can take a look at the previous files, uploaded on page one. I'm happy with the variety of games in these plans. The first 6 lessons have a very strong focus on the basics of phonics and English phonotactics, and that is reflected in the activities I chose.

I feel like a broken record, but as I have said time and time again, these are a guide, I even changed the titles of the columns to say "suggested" because apparently that was too difficult for people to understand. These are to give ALTs who have control over their curriculum an idea of what student centred teaching is about (again see the files on page one for my explanation, expanded version coming soon though), and an idea of how they might like to structure their year plans to make the most of the time they have available.

KIKKI.K
June 17th, 2014, 17:44
Although I can't quite say these plans are student-centered, I think it's good you're really thinking about your teaching. The more research I do on teaching, the more I wanna throw my old ideas out the window...lol It takes a really strong will to be open to criticism to get better. I'm glad you're sharing, especially in such an environment as ITIL ;)



As I said before, I'm well aware that these plans aren't 100% student centred. Without a textbook, access to the internet, homework etc I think this kind of thing is as close as you can get.

For me, proof is in class, based on speaking and how well they do with the reading and writing in the phonics activities. I don't have a problem any more with student participation, shy students etc, and most (85%+) of my students remember what we have covered in class, and don't need prompting during activities.

I'm more concerned that students a)are communicating real things (eg how they feel about something, what they have, what they want etc), b)aren't afraid of making mistakes, c)get in the habit of asking when they don't know something instead of just sitting there, and d)are well on their way to becoming independent learners.

KIKKI.K
June 18th, 2014, 15:30
Ok, I've decided to add the new files to the OP instead, since it's easier for people to find them there if they want.

There's a couple more to come, but that's all for today, I think.

coop52
June 18th, 2014, 16:15
OK, the plans make more sense now that I know what you mean by "Nonsense Words" and "Car Chase game" and whatnot. I still think it might be a good idea to make a master vocab list since just writing "fruits" or "animals" isn't really enough. If someone after you wants to use these plans, it'd be really helpful to have a list and amount of new words for each lesson for each grade.


I'm still not a big fan of so much prompting in Japanese from the ALT, especially with the little ones. They pick up stuff fast enough that they don't really need it. If they really don't get something after gestures or demonstrations, either have the HRT or one of the kids who does understand explain things.

Also, how are you evaluating or getting feedback from the students? I know you said that they're having fun, but I think it's important to have some sort of evaluation system to see that they're actually accomplishing the goals you set for them, especially in the areas of "communicating real things" and "becoming independent learners". I think you have some really good ideas, but it would be helpful for you/whoever comes after you to get feedback from the students' prospectives to tweak things and see what actually works best. It'd also be a good idea to get feedback from the HRTs as well.

Ini
June 18th, 2014, 16:20
formatting!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! Do you expect people to try and sift through that mess looking for information? If you tried to present something like that in any other job your boss would kick you out his office so fast your head would spin.

therealwindycity
June 18th, 2014, 16:23
formatting!?!?!?!?!?!?!?! Do you expect people to try and sift through that mess looking for information? If you tried to present something like that in any other job your boss would kick you out his office so fast your head would spin.

Ini has been saving his punctuation for weeks just for this moment. Be nice, now. You don't have to be so acerbic.

Ini
June 18th, 2014, 16:24
Areyoutryingtotellmeyoufoundthat






















messofwordsintheattachmentseasy











toread?

therealwindycity
June 18th, 2014, 16:28
It's a legitimate criticism, but we'd rather people not be afraid to upload and get comments on their lesson plans.

uthinkimlost?
June 18th, 2014, 18:24
Did I miss the individual lesson plans, or is it just the one repeated?

KIKKI.K
June 18th, 2014, 19:04
OK, the plans make more sense now that I know what you mean by "Nonsense Words" and "Car Chase game" and whatnot. I still think it might be a good idea to make a master vocab list since just writing "fruits" or "animals" isn't really enough. If someone after you wants to use these plans, it'd be really helpful to have a list and amount of new words for each lesson for each grade.


I'm still not a big fan of so much prompting in Japanese from the ALT, especially with the little ones. They pick up stuff fast enough that they don't really need it. If they really don't get something after gestures or demonstrations, either have the HRT or one of the kids who does understand explain things.

Also, how are you evaluating or getting feedback from the students? I know you said that they're having fun, but I think it's important to have some sort of evaluation system to see that they're actually accomplishing the goals you set for them, especially in the areas of "communicating real things" and "becoming independent learners". I think you have some really good ideas, but it would be helpful for you/whoever comes after you to get feedback from the students' prospectives to tweak things and see what actually works best. It'd also be a good idea to get feedback from the HRTs as well.

Coop, the vocab column clearly says it's vocab from the kaado de eigo sets, I'm pretty sure I put the link up to the webpage earlier in this thread. I honestly believe that you should choose the vocab yourself based on what your own students already know and what you think they should/ would like to learn.

I don't think that prompting from Japanese for the first couple of lessons is a big deal. And especially, it's not going to harm their English learning.

As for the evaluation, I mentioned my goals for my classes in my reply to namisuke. I'm trying to answer everyone's questions as best I can, but I really get sick of having to repeat myself over and over again.

Ini
June 18th, 2014, 19:06
maybe if you could explain yourself clearly you wouldn't have to repeat things?

KIKKI.K
June 18th, 2014, 19:06
Ini, I really, really dgaf what you think of my formatting. Why not, instead of just spazzing out about the "formatting issues" offer your ideas on how they should be formatted to be clearer. Maybe other ALTs would appreciate that.

Jiggit, my name is from a Swedish stationery brand.

KIKKI.K
June 18th, 2014, 19:07
Ini, how is this unclear?

"For me, proof is in class, based on speaking and how well they do with the reading and writing in the phonics activities. I don't have a problem any more with student participation, shy students etc, and most (85%+) of my students remember what we have covered in class, and don't need prompting during activities.

I'm more concerned that students a)are communicating real things (eg how they feel about something, what they have, what they want etc), b)aren't afraid of making mistakes, c)get in the habit of asking when they don't know something instead of just sitting there, and d)are well on their way to becoming independent learners."

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
June 18th, 2014, 19:10
Ini does have a hell of a lot of experience in these things. it might be worth listening to, even if you thought his delivery was on the harsh side. This place is (from what I understand) meant to be useful to as many people as possible, and conversely to be as accessible as possible to newer teachers. Formatting can be a big deal if you're not used to looking through reams of planning.

coop52
June 19th, 2014, 08:30
Ini, how is this unclear?

"For me, proof is in class, based on speaking and how well they do with the reading and writing in the phonics activities. I don't have a problem any more with student participation, shy students etc, and most (85%+) of my students remember what we have covered in class, and don't need prompting during activities.

I'm more concerned that students a)are communicating real things (eg how they feel about something, what they have, what they want etc), b)aren't afraid of making mistakes, c)get in the habit of asking when they don't know something instead of just sitting there, and d)are well on their way to becoming independent learners."

I still think it's a good idea to get the students' opinions and feelings, preferably in writing, so you can make sure none are falling through the cracks. It's pretty easy for a kid to go along with what everyone else is doing when they don't really understand or remember anything, and it's hard for teachers to notice it without getting individual feedback. With older kids, you can usually catch these kids by looking at their test results, but you obviously don't have that for ES level. Giving them an evaluation sheet of some sort would be pretty useful.

Are the HRTs aware of these goals? What is their role in planning the lessons? Do they give you feedback afterwards?

Jiggit
June 19th, 2014, 08:36
No, coop, it's better to just look at the kids and see if they are talking, silly. If you only base your opinion of yourself on an entirely subjective and unmeasurable method then you never have to entertain the possibility that there might be flaws in your lessons and can call everyone a troll if they try and question you.

uthinkimlost?
June 19th, 2014, 08:58
Kikki.k:

Ini has a point that your formatting and text spacing is abysmal. I have no idea what your settings in word are, but they are not helping you.

The feedback you have received here, both on your formatting and content, is pretty standard for peer reviews in education. I have no idea what your background actually is, or if you plan to continue teaching, but you will be torn a new one more often than not. How you accept it, even if it is packaged in an unpleasant way, will determine how you are seen by others. Ass-patting attaboys are unhelpful to everyone involved.

I don't know that every lesson should have an individual plan, but taking at least a few of these classes and giving a clear rundown of what happens, why, what you expect to get out of it, and how you will check for student comprehension/retention would be helpful. It would help us to give a clearer criticism of what you are doing, and it will help your eventual successor suss out what they need to do.

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 09:15
No, coop, it's better to just look at the kids and see if they are talking, silly. If you only base your opinion of yourself on an entirely subjective and unmeasurable method then you never have to entertain the possibility that there might be flaws in your lessons and can call everyone a troll if they try and question you.

The HRTs make notes on how the individual students are doing during the lesson.

Several of my schools have them, but how do you stop the teachers from standing over the students telling them to write down that they did badly because they made a mistake or didn't answer/speak fast enough. I have a fair few teachers who do that, and I've given up fighting them over the years, because nothing I say makes any difference to them. I get the feeling with this kind of thing that the students write what they think the teacher wants to hear, rather than how they really feel.

There's a whole lot of cultural stuff baggage, that shames students who can't get it on the first go, or take more time than others, and it really is sad.

I feel like there's so much pressure and assessment of students in Japan, and I don't think that having something formal like a sheet to fill in at the end of each lesson is necessarily the best way, at the ES level, to evaluate students.

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 09:19
I don't know that every lesson should have an individual plan, but taking at least a few of these classes and giving a clear rundown of what happens, why, what you expect to get out of it, and how you will check for student comprehension/retention would be helpful. It would help us to give a clearer criticism of what you are doing, and it will help your eventual successor suss out what they need to do.

It only took 5 pages, but finally we have some helpful criticism.

If you don't like the spacing and formatting, perhaps make some suggestions about what it should be.

My background is in Japanese, Linguistics, and English Language Teaching. But I studied theories of teaching, and evaluating methods depending on the students' goals, rather than making lesson plans and doing practicums. That comes under a teaching certificate, where I'm from.

Gizmotech
June 19th, 2014, 09:19
The HRTs make notes on how the individual students are doing during the lesson.

Several of my schools have them, but how do you stop the teachers from standing over the students telling them to write down that they did badly because they made a mistake or didn't answer/speak fast enough. I have a fair few teachers who do that, and I've given up fighting them over the years, because nothing I say makes any difference to them. I get the feeling with this kind of thing that the students write what they think the teacher wants to hear, rather than how they really feel.

There's a whole lot of cultural stuff baggage, that shames students who can't get it on the first go, or take more time than others, and it really is sad.

I feel like there's so much pressure and assessment of students in Japan, and I don't think that having something formal like a sheet to fill in at the end of each lesson is necessarily the best way, at the ES level, to evaluate students.

I'll address one point in this (I'll leave it to the rest for the ES actual stuff). Getting authentic writing out of the students is a simple matter if you just tell the JTE to sit down and have a cup of tea. Get them out of the activity. Let the students know the JTE won't see their final product. It can be amazingly liberating for them if they know only the ALT will interact with their content, and then they will give you genuine writing. I do this for diaries, and after making that change in my first year the level and quality of the writing went up noticeably.

uthinkimlost?
June 19th, 2014, 09:41
It only took 5 pages, but finally we have some helpful criticism.

If you don't like the spacing and formatting, perhaps make some suggestions about what it should be.

My background is in Japanese, Linguistics, and English Language Teaching. But I studied theories of teaching, and evaluating methods depending on the students' goals, rather than making lesson plans and doing practicums. That comes under a teaching certificate, where I'm from.

My last response before I head into the coal mine for the day:

Make sure you are typing in English, not romaji. Play with the settings for font spacing at the top menu of word. (This is sometimes called kerning. You can look up the different ways to control it.) Increase the spacing between individual paragraphs. Keep text around .25-.5 cm away from grid lines. When you create a main topic followed by subtopics and it is NOT in paragraph form, indent every subtopic.

a good rule of thumb: If it looks like shit when you are 4 feet from it, it looks like shit to everyone else when they are up close.

Especially if it isn't in your background, creating a thorough lesson plan for at least one lesson would be a good idea. Start at the end: What you want them to know/be able to do and how it will be assessed, and work your way back.

Write it as though you are explaining it to someone that has never seen your classes.

It is also incredibly important that you give the lower-level students a "way in" that makes certain they understand at least a portion the material, so creating activities that can have students of two levels working together is ideal.

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 10:17
My last response before I head into the coal mine for the day:

Make sure you are typing in English, not romaji. Play with the settings for font spacing at the top menu of word. (This is sometimes called kerning. You can look up the different ways to control it.) Increase the spacing between individual paragraphs. Keep text around .25-.5 cm away from grid lines. When you create a main topic followed by subtopics and it is NOT in paragraph form, indent every subtopic.

a good rule of thumb: If it looks like shit when you are 4 feet from it, it looks like shit to everyone else when they are up close.



I'm pretty sure I spaced everything at 1.5 lines, but perhaps something went wrong when it was uploaded. I'll take a look. Mostly I'm using Japanese Word 2010, but I work on these on different computers, so that might not help things. I don't know. Any way, I will take a look.

As for the other stuff, points taken on board, might have time to do something tonight.

Teishou
June 19th, 2014, 11:31
Out of curiosity, did you really just press "enter" a bunch of times until you got a new page...?

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 11:57
Yeah, because I couldn't figure out the random menus in Japanese, and it seemed like so much less hassle to do it this way. When you only have, at most an hour free each day, I really didn't want to be spending it staring at tiny simplified-for-digital kanji on my screen.

coop52
June 19th, 2014, 12:05
Pretty much everything is in the same place as it is in the English version, so at worst you can google pictures of the menus and use that to find the place you want.

uthinkimlost?
June 19th, 2014, 12:07
Yeah, because I couldn't figure out the random menus in Japanese, and it seemed like so much less hassle to do it this way. When you only have, at most an hour free each day, I really didn't want to be spending it staring at tiny simplified-for-digital kanji on my screen.

ctrl-enter will give a hard? return and a new page.

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 12:21
ctrl-enter will give a hard? return and a new page.

Thanks!

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 12:26
I'll address one point in this (I'll leave it to the rest for the ES actual stuff). Getting authentic writing out of the students is a simple matter if you just tell the JTE to sit down and have a cup of tea. Get them out of the activity. Let the students know the JTE won't see their final product. It can be amazingly liberating for them if they know only the ALT will interact with their content, and then they will give you genuine writing. I do this for diaries, and after making that change in my first year the level and quality of the writing went up noticeably.

Good idea, but I teach more than 1500 students across 5 schools, so collecting all those forms, and reading and collating them is too much work. Call me lazy if you want. It's why I stopped giving homework to the Year 5s and 6s, I was spending 1-2 hours after work (ie past my contract hours) each day marking it. I'm fine with doing extra work for my students when needed, but not every day like that.

coop52
June 19th, 2014, 12:28
How often do you see each class?

Gizmotech
June 19th, 2014, 12:36
Good idea, but I teach more than 1500 students across 5 schools, so collecting all those forms, and reading and collating them is too much work. Call me lazy if you want. It's why I stopped giving homework to the Year 5s and 6s, I was spending 1-2 hours after work (ie past my contract hours) each day marking it. I'm fine with doing extra work for my students when needed, but not every day like that.

Then you have to manage your expectations and not expect real content out of them at all. So long as you have a teacher in the room you will always have pressure, and need to assume the kids won't participate in the way you want, but in the way the teacher wants.

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 13:09
How often do you see each class?
It varies from an average of once a week, to 3 times a year. That's why I had so many different curricula up for the years 1-4, across my schools it's in a 0-1 (ie, years 1.2 get 0 lessons, years 3.4 get one), 3-6, 5-10, 15-15, 8-20 pattern. For my year 5s and 6s, it's normally in the 30-35 range, although until this academic year, my biggest school was only getting 20 lessons with me for the year 5s and 6s because of the way the BoE scheduled me. I eventually got sick of it enough to ask them to change the schedule, and hey, sometimes pigs fly, and they actually gave me the amount of days I asked for at each school this year.

KIKKI.K
June 19th, 2014, 13:16
Then you have to manage your expectations and not expect real content out of them at all. So long as you have a teacher in the room you will always have pressure, and need to assume the kids won't participate in the way you want, but in the way the teacher wants.

Yes. I try to manage that as much as possible. I have been consistently talking with my HRTs over the years to get them to calm down about mistakes, and not use words like "muzukashii" etc. Unfortunately, they keep changing schools ;)

At any rate, even if I was convinced there's enough value in evaluation forms for ES classes, there're too many negatives for me personally to want to use them. On top of that, I have 5 weeks' teaching left, so even if I was convinced, there wouldn't be much point. If the next ALT wants to use them, I'm sure they're perfectly capable of making them and using them themselves.