PDA

View Full Version : Stickers!



sourdoughsushi
May 7th, 2014, 04:30
(shortlisted 2014, here) I beseech you, oh Wise Ones, to share your stories of sticker use in the classroom. Tiny stickers, animal stickers, scented stickers. Happy kids and kids crying. How have you employed stickers as a motivation tool, and in which ways have they backfired in the past?

webstaa
May 7th, 2014, 08:27
There's probably around 10,000 stickers in my desk. I've never used them. Probably never will.

Jiggit
May 7th, 2014, 08:30
Are you going to be in ES? Otherwise I wouldn't bother with the stickers.

mrcharisma
May 7th, 2014, 08:47
If you try giving stickers to High School kids the best you can hope for is ironic appreciation. More than likely you'll get the exact same reception as you would if you tried giving stickers to 16 year-olds in your home country.

Lianwen
May 7th, 2014, 11:52
Are you going to be in ES? Otherwise I wouldn't bother with the stickers.

This.

johnny
May 7th, 2014, 14:11
I'm a JHS ALT, and my 1st and 2nd graders still like stickers. By 3rd grade they don't really seem to care. At the 3rd grade level, stickers are momentary evidence of their victory and little more.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Jiggit
May 7th, 2014, 14:13
Do you just halt class to hand out random stickers? Or are you the sticker bitch while your JTE teaches?

johnny
May 7th, 2014, 14:15
I am many things, including a sticker bitch. Thusly, I refuse to be judged for that adpect of my personality.

INRE the stickers, I hand them out to victors of our gladiatorial English games after class.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ini
May 7th, 2014, 14:26
I cant stand stickers and hate everything they represent.

johnny
May 7th, 2014, 14:27
Even Mickey Mouse stickers?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ini
May 7th, 2014, 14:32
if you hand out stickers you might as well hang a sign round your neck saying "my lessons are boring and I don't know how to motivate students without resorting to bribery"

johnny
May 7th, 2014, 14:35
Truth be told, some of my activities are pretty boring. Some subjects allow for more fun than others.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Gizmotech
May 7th, 2014, 15:43
I have never used stickers as a reward mechanic (seeing as that is plain bribery assuming the student is motivated).

I have used stickers for my own reasons, usually around seasonal times when they are cheap. For instance, when identifying which essays were handed into me early at christmas, I put a simple (and dirt cheap) sticker on it so I knew who to give extra points to. I also saw some cute ones and just attached them as gifts to my second year journals for the students to use however they want.

Noone was particularly impressed, except maybe a few first year girls who got em on particularly impressive writing.

I imagine if you are teaching significantly younger students they appreciate it more, but I gotta agree with Ini. If the lesson is so un-interesting, or your students so un motivated to learn English that you need to bribe them, then you probably should look at the causes instead of bandaiding a solution.

sourdoughsushi
May 7th, 2014, 16:59
Thanks for chiming in, guys. When I first heard of JETs using stickers it seemed as if were used more as motivation for the kids to raise their hands and get outside of their shells. With that said, another question: If not stickers, what are some methods you use to coax participation when kids are being shy?

therealwindycity
May 7th, 2014, 17:06
In my experience, getting kids to laugh a few times at the beginning of a lesson can really affect whether they feel comfortable participating and help draw shy kids out of their shells. It's not a science, but it really seems to help at my schools.

Jiggit
May 7th, 2014, 17:07
Don't bother trying to get kids to raise their hands. Don't bother quizzing them. If you really need one student to ask them a question then call them by name.

Hand raising is not a part of the Japanese classroom and they won't participate even with stickers or candy. The same 5 attention seeking kids will just raise their hands every time while the rest sit there sulking.

johnny
May 7th, 2014, 23:26
In my experience, getting kids to laugh a few times at the beginning of a lesson can really affect whether they feel comfortable participating and help draw shy kids out of their shells. It's not a science, but it really seems to help at my schools.

Yeah, this is been a somewhat effective technique in my limited time as an ALT. Breaking the ice is a good way of letting the kids drop their shields, so to speak, and not be so self-conscious.

Page
May 8th, 2014, 13:12
I sometimes use them for checking textbooks at ES but my JHS JTE LOVES stickers. They get stickers on their writing assignments, winning games, and also for doing the reading (1 sticker to read from the text, 2 to read from the fill in the blank copy of the text, and 3 for doing it all from memory--JTE uses it as a measure of their participation since they put them in their notebooks) so I keep a large stock of stickers. If you want to bring some bring characters that are popular here too (anything Disney or Spongebob). I brought some English reward stickers but they're only exciting to 1st/2nd/3rd grade ES kids. Scented stickers might be interesting but tbh Japan has a lot of stickers already so you shouldn't feel like you have to bring them from your home country.

Zolrak 22
May 8th, 2014, 13:50
If you are into giving stickers to students , you could always custom make them in websites like MOO | Business Logo Stickers (http://us.moo.com/products/business-logo-stickers.html).

Though I doubt most alts would be willing to waste that much money.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk

Ini
May 8th, 2014, 13:57
this is a lot cheaper (http://www.amazon.co.jp/%E3%82%A8%E3%83%BC%E3%83%AF%E3%83%B3-A-one-%E3%82%A4%E3%83%B3%E3%82%AF%E3%82%B8%E3%82%A7%E3%83%83%E3%83%88-%E5%85%89%E6%B2%A2%E7%B4%99%E3%83%BB%E3%83%9B%E3%83%AF%E3%82%A4%E3%83%88-29223/dp/B000A63F56/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&qid=1399525024&sr=8-8&keywords=%E3%83%A9%E3%83%99%E3%83%AB%E3%82%B7%E3%83%BC%E3%83%AB%5B%E3%82%A4%E3%83%B3%E3%82%AF%E3%82%B8%E3%82%A7%E3%83%83%E3%83%88)

sourdoughsushi
May 8th, 2014, 14:09
Living in a remote area, I would have to order some stickers from Amazon, anyway. I guess I'll wait and get a feel for my JTEs' teaching styles. (Waiting seems to be the answer for any shortlister question)

Ini
May 8th, 2014, 14:11
schools have budgets for this kind of thing. no need to buy stickers yourself. wait till you get to school and buy them out the the school supplies catalog.

Gizmotech
May 8th, 2014, 14:49
schools have budgets for this kind of thing. no need to buy stickers yourself. wait till you get to school and buy them out the the school supplies catalog.

Word. When I did my essay marking, I just used standard envelop labels with my marking structure on em and stuck em to the paper over the instructions. The staff were more than happy to let me have an entire pack of stickers without even batting an eyelash at it.

coop52
May 8th, 2014, 22:52
I used to use a lot of stickers, but now I pull them out for only for holidays. I've switched over to stamps since they're much cheaper. Most of the kids over the age of 8 or so aren't really impressed with stickers anyway, beyond maybe an initial "kawaii!!!" if it's a Snoopy sticker or something.

ihatefall
May 8th, 2014, 23:05
I knew an ALT that had two stamps, I think they were 1500-2000 yen each. But he got one of his smiling face with a thumbs up, and one one with a frown and a thumbs down. Apparently, they were a big hit.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ebi
May 8th, 2014, 23:28
I use stickers for elementary school, but not every time and not for every thing. Usually I'll do it as a special treat, especially if it's a one-off class, holiday event, or it's a quiz-based game where I can ask enough questions to get every kid at least one sticker and then the "genki" kids get a shot at earning a second one. I think I give too many sometimes though, so I hope to cut back a bit at my next school.

Oddly, my JTEs also use stickers extensively at my JHS as well for all three grades. But it's used as a point system rather than an "ooo shiny!" prize. It depends on the JTE, but some will hand out stickers after every class to every student who was called on and gave an answer. So far I've never witnessed a kid trying to scam for unearned stickers so I've got to admire their honesty.

-----------------

As for non-sticker based motivation, one of my favorite tricks is using UNO cards. All you need is one deck of your typical pack of UNO cards, sorted into two identical piles: one of each color (red, green, blue, yellow) for the numbers 1-9. Each pile should have 36 cards, but be careful not to mix them together since the accuracy is important. Pick one pile and pass them out to students, one per each.* Then you can draw from the other pile. Whoever has the matching number AND color to the card you draw is now summoned to do your bidding and must bring their card to you, which you collect in a discard pile separate from the pile you're drawing from.

Surprisingly, I get very little resistance from any students when I use the UNO method. Since drawing the number is an act of fate they don't try to wiggle out of it as much as other methods and you can avoid the awkwardness of asking for volunteers or picking names, which may seem unfair. The biggest thing to watch out for is kids who may try to hide the cards. Also, the cards may suffer wear and tear unless you stress that they're your personal property.

*If you have fewer than 36 students you will need to remove the cards from the matching deck so you won't draw an unused card. If you have more than 36 kids per class, then you can add in some wild cards or reverse or whatever. (I think the max would be 49 unless you want to consider Wild and Wild+4 separate.)

sourdoughsushi
May 9th, 2014, 02:06
As for non-sticker based motivation, one of my favorite tricks is using UNO cards. All you need is one deck of your typical pack of UNO cards, sorted into two identical piles: one of each color (red, green, blue, yellow) for the numbers 1-9. Each pile should have 36 cards, but be careful not to mix them together since the accuracy is important. Pick one pile and pass them out to students, one per each.* Then you can draw from the other pile. Whoever has the matching number AND color to the card you draw is now summoned to do your bidding and must bring their card to you, which you collect in a discard pile separate from the pile you're drawing from.

Surprisingly, I get very little resistance from any students when I use the UNO method. Since drawing the number is an act of fate they don't try to wiggle out of it as much as other methods and you can avoid the awkwardness of asking for volunteers or picking names, which may seem unfair. The biggest thing to watch out for is kids who may try to hide the cards. Also, the cards may suffer wear and tear unless you stress that they're your personal property.

*If you have fewer than 36 students you will need to remove the cards from the matching deck so you won't draw an unused card. If you have more than 36 kids per class, then you can add in some wild cards or reverse or whatever. (I think the max would be 49 unless you want to consider Wild and Wild+4 separate.)

Evil genius at work, here. I love it.

Ini
May 9th, 2014, 04:21
I knew an ALT that had two stamps, I think they were 1500-2000 yen each. But he got one of his smiling face with a thumbs up, and one one with a frown and a thumbs down. Apparently, they were a big hit.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It had a thumbs down???? And he bought it in Japan?

be careful with using any stamp or sticker with a thumbs down on it, especially with younger kids who don't realize you are being a western goon who doesn't know better. In Japan a thumbs down is much stronger than in the west and you are basically saying to any kid who made a minor mistake to fuck off and die.

Jiggit
May 9th, 2014, 08:28
picking names, which may seem unfair

Nope. It's what Japanese teachers do.

therealwindycity
May 9th, 2014, 08:39
It had a thumbs down???? And he bought it in Japan?

be careful with using any stamp or sticker with a thumbs down on it, especially with younger kids who don't realize you are being a western goon who doesn't know better. In Japan a thumbs down is much stronger than in the west and you are basically saying to any kid who made a minor mistake to fuck off and die.

Yeah, I've had a few teachers say this to me too. Maybe that's why the students loved the thumbs-down so much - it'd be like a teacher back home with a stamp of himself flipping the bird

johnny
May 9th, 2014, 11:42
Nope. It's what Japanese teachers do.

I don't know how else to do it. Otherwise a lot of the kids are happy to sit quiet.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

coop52
May 9th, 2014, 12:19
I've had JTEs who used number cards or sticks to pick kids to answer questions. No one fusses since the teachers just pull out one at random.

Jiggit
May 9th, 2014, 12:30
I've had JTEs who used number cards or sticks to pick kids to answer questions. No one fusses since the teachers just pull out one at random.

No one fusses in my class because I rule with an iron fist.

word
May 9th, 2014, 12:38
https://gs1.wac.edgecastcdn.net/8019B6/data.tumblr.com/tumblr_lp84zzK9Y91r0y44no1_400.gif

uthinkimlost?
May 9th, 2014, 12:39
No one fusses in my class because I rule with an iron fist.

Wearing a gauntlet filled with petroleum jelly doesn't count.



I do actually like the drawing numbers idea. I might do that for my writing classes, just so I don't need to keep track.

Antonath
May 9th, 2014, 18:52
I've had JTEs who used number cards or sticks to pick kids to answer questions. No one fusses since the teachers just pull out one at random.
I've been known to use the minute-hand on the clock, the thermostat on the heater, and the date to choose students. Like you say, the students don't care as long as it's not the same person every time.

Jiggit
May 9th, 2014, 19:32
Wearing a gauntlet filled with petroleum jelly doesn't count.


I don't get this reference, sorry.

uthinkimlost?
May 9th, 2014, 21:13
Vague reference to Of Mice and Men when a guy wears a glove full of Vaseline to keep his hand soft for the fondling of his wife's vagina.

Jiggit
May 9th, 2014, 21:30
Aww, how sweet. I wish I had a vagina to fondle.

uthinkimlost?
May 9th, 2014, 21:55
Soften those calloused mitts and the アイドル will flock to you.

Ini
May 9th, 2014, 22:26
I doubt the scrawny, sport hating metrosexual college boy has calloused mitts....

uthinkimlost?
May 9th, 2014, 22:33
I doubt the scrawny, sport hating metrosexual college boy has calloused mitts....

The hand that controls the mouse never gets lubed.

Jiggit
May 9th, 2014, 23:19
I doubt the scrawny, sport hating metrosexual college boy has calloused mitts....

http://i.imgur.com/bbDS4.gif

I actually have callouses from lifting so haha fuck you.