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Randomgirl
May 16th, 2014, 11:53
Quick Q about Fukushima - how long are kids allowed to play outside around the no go zone? Are there any restrictions for the rest of the prefecture about kids outside?

Fukushima seems like one of the most beautiful prefecture, nature-wise!!!! If I wasn't bringing a young child with me, I wouldn't hesitate!!!

Kamirose
May 16th, 2014, 12:34
Quick Q about Fukushima - how long are kids allowed to play outside around the no go zone? Are there any restrictions for the rest of the prefecture about kids outside?

Fukushima seems like one of the most beautiful prefecture, nature-wise!!!! If I wasn't bringing a young child with me, I wouldn't hesitate!!!
I live in basically the closest city you can get to the no-go zone without being actually in it. In fact, half of my city is still evacuated. There are radiation counters set up at every single school and most public buildings in the entire prefecture, and I can see mine from the window right now - it says 0.133 microsieverts/hr. That is actually below the worldwide average - NYC averages 0.25usv/hr just by virture of being a very populated city.

Basically, if you're outside of the no-go zone, there aren't any restrictions, and it's perfectly safe. The Japanese government is very strict on where they open up - some of the areas still in the no-go zone are safe to return to, but people still aren't allowed to return because they haven't finished the official decontamination efforts yet (such as the half of my city that is still evacuated).

Fukushima is also the third largest prefecture in Japan - the neighboring prefectures are actually closer to the power plant than the farthest area of Fukushima! (the neighboring prefectures are not contaminated, don't worry. But neither were the inland areas of Fukushima, even right after the earthquake)

Ini
May 16th, 2014, 12:48
Air in Fukushima is a hell of a lot cleaner than the air in kanto

Kamirose
May 16th, 2014, 12:58
Especially by the ocean! I grew up in an ocean town, I love the fresh air!

Tako
May 16th, 2014, 13:16
Quick Q about Fukushima - how long are kids allowed to play outside around the no go zone? Are there any restrictions for the rest of the prefecture about kids outside?

Fukushima seems like one of the most beautiful prefecture, nature-wise!!!! If I wasn't bringing a young child with me, I wouldn't hesitate!!!

Me too. Bringing the kiddos and just nervous about Fukushima and surrounding areas. If it were just me and I had no family, I'd *probably* accept placement there after all the work, time, and $$ spent to make it this far.

Ini
May 16th, 2014, 13:24
you kiddos will get a lot more radiation on the flight over compared to living anywhere in fukushima for a year. closest places to daiichi you could live are haramachi or hirono and theres no significant radiation there.

windar
May 16th, 2014, 13:33
Basically, if you're outside of the no-go zone, there aren't any restrictions, and it's perfectly safe. The Japanese government is very strict on where they open up - some of the areas still in the no-go zone are safe to return to, but people still aren't allowed to return because they haven't finished the official decontamination efforts yet (such as the half of my city that is still evacuated).

I have to wonder if you're aware of Japan's horrendous environmental record, especially regarding the disposal of hazardous chemicals and nuclear waste?

The Japanese government, in collusion with industry, has an egregious record of covering up fires and disturbances at their nuclear facilities, of turning a blind eye to waste dumping in rural areas, of putting its own citizens at risk for fear of stirring social unrest. This isn't different from other countries, to be sure, but the lack of an environmental oversight agency with any real teeth--not to mention a near impossibility of suing government or companies for negligence--means that we have no good reason to believe what the Japanese government-business-media-bureacracy complex tells us about health risks near Fukushima.

I'm speaking mostly from Alex Kerr's Dogs and Demons, but there are plenty of books in English out there documenting Japan's power brokers' terrible environmental record and the public's absolute lack of power to change it.

I'm inclined to believe the geiger counter, of course. I doubt anyone would tinker with how it's calibrated... I'm just wary of insinuating there's no way other information could be skewed to put people's minds at rest.

(Sorry for derailing the discussion. Best of luck on your placements, everybody!)

Kamirose
May 16th, 2014, 13:39
I have to wonder if you're aware of Japan's horrendous environmental record, especially regarding the disposal of hazardous chemicals and nuclear waste?

The Japanese government, in collusion with industry, has an egregious record of covering up fires and disturbances at their nuclear facilities, of turning a blind eye to waste dumping in rural areas, of putting its own citizens at risk for fear of stirring social unrest. This isn't different from other countries, to be sure, but the lack of an environmental oversight agency with any real teeth--not to mention a near impossibility of suing government or companies for negligence--means that we have no good reason to believe what the Japanese government-business-media-bureacracy complex tells us about health risks near Fukushima.

I'm speaking mostly from Alex Kerr's Dogs and Demons, but there are plenty of books in English out there documenting Japan's power brokers' terrible environmental record and the public's absolute lack of power to change it.

I'm inclined to believe the geiger counter, of course. I doubt anyone would tinker with how it's calibrated... I'm just wary of insinuating there's no way other information could be skewed to put people's minds at rest.

(Sorry for derailing the discussion. Best of luck on your placements, everybody!)

You don't need to believe the Japanese government. That comment was not on their environmental policies in general, just on how slowly they're allowing people back into safe areas.

There have been numerous independent studies on the radiation levels in the areas outside of the exclusion zone and some areas within the exclusion zone that have concluded that there are no health risks for living there, that have nothing to do with the Japanese government. I don't have links on hand but I can get them from other ALTs here if you are interested in reading them. As a side note, pretty much every ALT here hates TEPCO and the coverups. You can dislike the corruption while still having an informed opinion - TEPCO being evil doesn't equate the prefecture being unsafe.

This is one reason I ask that people who are placed there talk to ALTs here before making their decision. There are resources that haven't been widely publicized because "Fukushima is safe" doesn't make as much money for media companies as "Fukushima is a nuclear wasteland" does.

Ini
May 16th, 2014, 13:41
Buy your own dosimeter if you are a tin foil hat wearing loony, won't change anything

yingyangryder
May 16th, 2014, 14:18
As you know, the exclusion zone is still a no go. Hence the name exclusion zone, however elsewhere in the prefecture, as Kamirose says has radiation counters everywhere. I have yet to see one that is higher than the worldwide average. I would recommend Fukushima to anyone and everyone.

EDIT: Also, I have been to Hirono, wonderful place with wonderful people.

Randomgirl
May 16th, 2014, 14:23
Would you bring your 4/5 year old to an area just outside the exclusion zone? Or would you guys who live there hesitate?

Lianwen
May 16th, 2014, 14:39
My friend's going through a similar debate, but that's because she's heard a lot of fear-talk. She's worried about just flying over the prefecture.

As long as your kid isn't running into the exclusion zone and putting their mouths on everything, I'll think they'll be fine.

Kamirose
May 16th, 2014, 14:44
Would you bring your 4/5 year old to an area just outside the exclusion zone? Or would you guys who live there hesitate?

The only time I would hesitate would be if:
1. You are planning hiking through the mountains directly next to the exclusion zone with your child a lot, AND
2. Your child has a habit of eating wild plants like mushrooms

Otherwise, I would have no hesitation. I don't actually know any JETs in the prefecture with children, though, but being a JET with children is fairly rare to begin with so I doubt it means anything.

yingyangryder
May 16th, 2014, 14:53
If it was me, I wouldn`t hesitate. However, I don`t have a child so I cannot realistically answer that question. How far outside is "just outside"?

Randomgirl
May 16th, 2014, 15:01
Isn't that the million dollar question!! I know a few people in Fukushima, so personally I don't have problems with being there, but I am mostly nervous about the food. I was there for the snow brand fiasco, a CEO in our area hung himself because he didn't report the bird flu in his birds, etc, etc - I don't trust food companies there very much. I'm going to guess that much of the radiation is in the land and ocean- inland, I can't imagine there being much of an issue. Still though, as a parent it would be a tough choice!

yingyangryder
May 16th, 2014, 15:09
Every bag of rice is checked for radiation levels. Each farm has food tested on a regular basis, having visited these test centers too, I trust the food here. Actually the radiation threshold used in these tests is much much lower than that of the UK/US, although I don`t remember the exact amount. I just remember being surprised when I found out. I can imagine it is indeed a tough choice as a parent so I hope Kamirose`s and my posts can help a little. Or anyone else who lives, has lived, or has been to Fukushima.

spman2099
May 16th, 2014, 15:17
Isn't that the million dollar question!! I know a few people in Fukushima, so personally I don't have problems with being there, but I am mostly nervous about the food. I was there for the snow brand fiasco, a CEO in our area hung himself because he didn't report the bird flu in his birds, etc, etc - I don't trust food companies there very much. I'm going to guess that much of the radiation is in the land and ocean- inland, I can't imagine there being much of an issue. Still though, as a parent it would be a tough choice!

There are a lot of independent reports on the food. If you do a Google search you will find that the fish, even the bottom feeders (which absorbed the most radiation) are very comfortably in the safe to eat range of radiation. Apparently there are still many people in Fukushima that are paranoid about their food, but independent study has shown that their paranoia does not reflect the actual safety of the food. I get that you are nervous, but all the information available (at least the suitably informed stuff) seems to pretty conclusively say that the food is safe. That being said, I guarantee that there will be lots of alternates that will be quite willing to take your spot if you can't get over your hesitation. Worst case scenario you make the day of some other JET hopeful.

Kamirose
May 16th, 2014, 15:18
If you're nervous about the food, pretty much all food and produce are labeled with the prefecture that it was grown in, so you can easily avoid food from Fukushima. I do urge you to put a little research into it, though. I live in the area most affected by the radiation, and there are no farms in production in my area because of the proximity - I'm not even sure if it's legal to farm here. Once you get into the other areas, the food is tested so anything that is sold is fine. Remember, Fukushima is HUGE, the areas that do the most farming are in areas that were never even remotely close to the areas with raised radiation levels.

BeckyJones
May 16th, 2014, 15:55
The only risk to children was the release of iodine-131 and cesium-137. iodine having the greatest risk for causing thyroid cancer in children. Iodine-131 will give your kids thyroid cancer. It's proven, and it is super dangerous.. RUN RUN FOR YOUR LIFE!!!




oh wait,
Iodine-131 has a half life of 8 days. so the accident was on 3/11/11 so using today's date of 5/16/14 that accident happened 1162 days ago
1162/8 = 146 half-lifes ago. So even if the amount of iodine-131 released was a large amount (it wasn't) it hasn't been a danger in years.
lets do some fun math
if you know what a half life is, you know that an elements half life is the time it takes for half the amount of that element to decay into another element. Iodine-131 decays into stable non radioactive elements btw (you can look it up).
so lets say 1000kgs of deadly evil radiative iodine-131 was released, estimates however say that it was less than 100kgs but lets assume 10 times that with 1000kgs. If you divide that by 2 146 times
here is a handy dandy formula
(1/2)^(# of half lives past) x (initial mass)
so let's plug our numbers in shall we
(1/2)^146 x (1000) = 1.1213kg still around and kicking it.
AKA, not a fucking problem.

as for Cesium-137, it's halflife is 30 years. It is less radioactive than Iodine-131 but still dangerous as it decays with beta radiation as well as gamma radiation. im going to quote wiki here with this tidbit



Caesium-137 reacts with water producing a water-soluble compound (caesium hydroxide (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium_hydroxide)), and the biological behavior of caesium is similar to that of potassium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium) and rubidium (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubidium). After entering the body, caesium gets more or less uniformly distributed throughout the body, with the highest concentrations in soft tissue (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soft_tissue).[17] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium-137#cite_note-RPD-17):114 The biological half-life (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_half-life) of caesium is rather short at about 70 days.[18] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium-137#cite_note-18) A 1972 experiment showed that when dogs are subjected to a whole body burden (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whole_body_burden) of 3800 μCi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curie)/kg (140 MBq/kg, or approximately 44 μg/kg) of caesium-137 (and 950 to 1400 rads (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rad)), they die within thirty-three days, while animals with half of that burden all survived for a year.[19] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium-137#cite_note-19)

Accidental ingestion of caesium-137 can be treated with Prussian blue (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prussian_blue), which binds to it chemically and reduces the biological half-life to 30 days.[20] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium-137#cite_note-20)
so you can see, it is deadly. but look at those numbers and note that this is ingestion. They had to eat the cesium. The estimates for how much Cesium released during the disaster are highly contended and debateable. But there is good news, You really have to ingest cesium-137 for it to really hurt you because beta radiation doesn't really penetrate skin all that well and that far...

Most of the cesium is concentrated in the water, and area directly surrounding the reactor. The radiation it is giving off isn't that high if you look at the sievert count, but if you were to live there, there is a chance you would ingest radioactive cesium hence the exclusion zone. Outside the exclusion zone the cesium has already been diluted enough (it was never really that high to begin with) through natural process that you have nothing to fear from it either. Remember, radiation is normal and everywhere... Don't let the idiots fool you, Radiation is EVERYWHERE and it is NATURAL as well as man made.

There, I'm done.

BeckyJones
May 16th, 2014, 15:57
so a simple easy answer.
Don't worry about it as there isn't enough radiation/radioactive elements to cause a significant chance of cancer or death. You are worse off in Denver (a very radioactive city), or Australia (a very radioactive continent) than you are in Fukushima city.

Ini
May 16th, 2014, 16:10
There's nothing to worry about, even in the "no go zone" it's not that bad apart from a few hotspots.

throwawayfor
May 16th, 2014, 17:03
Does this mean people have already gotten placements?

Kamirose
May 16th, 2014, 17:20
Don't think so, these are "if you get placed here" questions. :)

Jiggit
May 16th, 2014, 17:31
What if you travel everywhere by hot-air balloon and your kids accidentally drift into the sea directly next to the reactor. WHAT THEN?

Ini
May 16th, 2014, 17:41
It's not too bad down by the sea, radiation isn't much higher than the rest of the country.
http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/05/16/ma8yry3a.jpg

Shincantsen
May 17th, 2014, 00:09
Ah, the natural beauty of glorious Nippon!

yingyangryder
May 20th, 2014, 15:57
You are a good 2.5+ hours away, if not more. How far away do your parents want you to be? As said, if you want to be dictated by your parents your whole life, if you`re cool with it and you don`t mind then sure, drop out. I am sure someone would be willing to snap that placement up in seconds. I live in Fukushima, MUCH closer than to the plant than anyone in Sendai. My mother was against it, but I said fuck if I care, I have done my research and I came, and I do not regret a thing. Also Kamirose lives even closer than I, we have both said it is fine. We would not lie to you.

Ini
May 20th, 2014, 16:07
2.5+ hours to sendai? how slow do you drive?

ekm
May 20th, 2014, 16:21
You are a good 2.5+ hours away, if not more. How far away do your parents want you to be? As said, if you want to be dictated by your parents your whole life, if you`re cool with it and you don`t mind then sure, drop out. I am sure someone would be willing to snap that placement up in seconds. I live in Fukushima, MUCH closer than to the plant than anyone in Sendai. My mother was against it, but I said fuck if I care, I have done my research and I came, and I do not regret a thing. Also Kamirose lives even closer than I, we have both said it is fine. We would not lie to you.


There are just so many mixed messages it is hard to know what is the right thing to do. In regards to everyone having a go at me for caring about what my parents think, I feel like it would be a selfish decision to put myself in a position where my parents are worrying about me everyday, they told me that if i choose to move to sendai, then that is my choice and they won't stop me.

I am still have obvious concerns myself, it is not just my parents that are making me hesitant.

You can't deny it is a risky choice to make. I understand there is evidence to prove it is safe, and cities like New York and Paris have higher radiation levels than Sendai, but they don't have a damaged nuclear plant nearby.

Please no more negative comments guys, I was just looking for support and I have received that from some so thank you.

I love Japan and want to participate in JET more than ever, I just wanted to make sure I am making an educated decision

par92186
May 20th, 2014, 16:25
You can't deny it is a risky choice to make.

Moving anywhere in Japan can be a risk for anyone. You are right to feel the way you do. Think it over yourself and you'll eventually make the right decision. :)
Good luck!

Ini
May 20th, 2014, 16:30
You can't deny it is a risky choice to make.

I can and will deny it.

There is zero risk of suffering negative effects from radiation living in Sendai at the moment and there is zero risk of anything happening at the plant in the future that would affect people in Sendai. Of course if the reactor 4 building collapses most of the hamadori coast in fukushima will be screwed but thats about it.

Gizmotech
May 20th, 2014, 17:03
I can and will deny it.

There is zero risk of suffering negative effects from radiation living in Sendai at the moment and there is zero risk of anything happening at the plant in the future that would affect people in Sendai. Of course if the reactor 4 building collapses most of the hamadori coast in fukushima will be screwed but thats about it.

Doesn't the mountain range between fukushima and sendai basically mean the weather pattern could never really shift even IF fukushima could meltdown and disperse ionizing radiation? (Which from what I understand it is no longer capable of doing so)

ekm, I wish you the best, and hope you make an informed decision about it. I wouldn't worry about your parents too much, they are adults and can deal with things themselves (much like we are asking you to do). Also, don't dismiss what Ini is saying, he actually lives there.

Honestly, you would be turning down one of the nicest JET placements in the entire country on a risk. Said risk is lower than the chances of you getting hit by a car where ever you live (especially lower if you live in city). I have a few friends who have lived there and do live there and I am always insanely jealous of them, even though I can get there in three hours by bus.

osakavamp
May 20th, 2014, 17:08
There are just so many mixed messages it is hard to know what is the right thing to do. In regards to everyone having a go at me for caring about what my parents think, I feel like it would be a selfish decision to put myself in a position where my parents are worrying about me everyday, they told me that if i choose to move to sendai, then that is my choice and they won't stop me.

I am still have obvious concerns myself, it is not just my parents that are making me hesitant.

You can't deny it is a risky choice to make. I understand there is evidence to prove it is safe, and cities like New York and Paris have higher radiation levels than Sendai, but they don't have a damaged nuclear plant nearby.

Please no more negative comments guys, I was just looking for support and I have received that from some so thank you.

I love Japan and want to participate in JET more than ever, I just wanted to make sure I am making an educated decision


Sendai is not Fukushima. Sendai is not anywhere close to Fukushima. My friend lives in Sendai with her 2.5 year old daughter. She was 8 months pregnant when the quake happened. She is a very intelligent, very, very, VERY cautious person. Especially when it comes to radiation and the health of her family. And she continues to live in Sendai.

Gon
May 20th, 2014, 17:11
There are just so many mixed messages it is hard to know what is the right thing to do. In regards to everyone having a go at me for caring about what my parents think, I feel like it would be a selfish decision to put myself in a position where my parents are worrying about me everyday, they told me that if i choose to move to sendai, then that is my choice and they won't stop me.

I am still have obvious concerns myself, it is not just my parents that are making me hesitant.

You can't deny it is a risky choice to make. I understand there is evidence to prove it is safe, and cities like New York and Paris have higher radiation levels than Sendai, but they don't have a damaged nuclear plant nearby.

Please no more negative comments guys, I was just looking for support and I have received that from some so thank you.

I love Japan and want to participate in JET more than ever, I just wanted to make sure I am making an educated decision

Hi ekm. I can understand the way you are feeling because I was in the same position as you. I was placed in a prefecture adjacent to Fukushima - in fact much closer to the plant than Miyagi is. Personally I wasn't too worried about it, but my parents were quite upset. I did some research, and they also did some research, and we talked about. I never considered forfeiting my spot, but I also didn't want them to worry about me all the time. Every one we talked to had similar responses - the radiation levels are constantly monitored and are well within safe limits and there is nothing to worry about. As long as you are outside the exclusion zone you are perfectly safe, and you are very far away from it. You can find more info in the Fukushima thread. My advice is to gather all the info you can and share it with your parents (this seems to be what you are doing anyway). They should come around eventually, and hopefully the information will help alleviate some of your own concerns too. Good luck with your decision, I hope you decide to come and have a blast on JET :)

Kamirose
May 20th, 2014, 17:20
I live in a city that is half in the exclusion zone, in the closest district to the exclusion zone that is still open (I suppose I should finally name it, I live in Haramachi district in Minamisoma City). I also work at the elementary school closest to the exclusion zone that is still open, I'm there once a week. I feel 100% perfectly safe, based on my own research and the radiation counters that are everywhere in the prefecture. The exclusion zone around the power plant is a 20km radius. Sendai is 110km from the power plant.

You should make whatever decision you're comfortable with, I'm not trying to pressure you or anything. But Sendai is, empirically, with no room for interpretation, 100% safe and not in any danger from the nuclear power plant in Fukushima.

teabot
May 20th, 2014, 17:25
throwing out there that while i'm not in tohoku at all, i came in 2011. my parents (and i) were pretty concerned, but since my father happens to work in the nuclear industry, he had to attend some information meetings about the status of the plant for his job. it had the bonus of allaying those fears even back then. i'll be starting year 4 this summer.

coop52
May 20th, 2014, 19:34
There are just so many mixed messages it is hard to know what is the right thing to do. In regards to everyone having a go at me for caring about what my parents think, I feel like it would be a selfish decision to put myself in a position where my parents are worrying about me everyday, they told me that if i choose to move to sendai, then that is my choice and they won't stop me.

I am still have obvious concerns myself, it is not just my parents that are making me hesitant.

You can't deny it is a risky choice to make. I understand there is evidence to prove it is safe, and cities like New York and Paris have higher radiation levels than Sendai, but they don't have a damaged nuclear plant nearby.

Please no more negative comments guys, I was just looking for support and I have received that from some so thank you.

I love Japan and want to participate in JET more than ever, I just wanted to make sure I am making an educated decision

My parents still worry about radiation and such. I live 400ish miles away from Dai-ichi. They didn't believe me until I pointed out the same distance using a US map. They've always been worry-worts though. I found 75 or so emails from them the first time I checked after I got here, and that was way before the big earthquake. They got better (until the earthquake at least) once they realized that moving to Japan wasn't as dangerous as they thought. Yours will be fine too.

Ini
May 20th, 2014, 21:31
The exclusion zone around the power plant is a 20km radius.

well not really, not for the last year or so. you might not want to live in the 10-20km area but you can pretty much wander around it if you want. the security checks are at the 10km mark.

yingyangryder
May 20th, 2014, 22:20
2.5+ hours to sendai? how slow do you drive?

I don't, used google maps.

Anyway, Fukushima is and has been fine (minus the exclusion area). I can understand that some people worry but with the wealth of knowledge available, I would imagine that is easy to make an informed decision.

BeckyJones
May 21st, 2014, 08:49
There are just so many mixed messages it is hard to know what is the right thing to do.

listen to the science and evidence. Tell the people who tell you otherwise that they are stupid and that they should fek off.



I am still have obvious concerns myself, it is not just my parents that are making me hesitant.

if the evidence and science doesn't sway you, nothing else will. Don't come. Harsh for me to say, but there are others that will gladly take your place. The choice is yours.
Come or don't... It doesn't matter to us. So why would we lie to bring you here, or scare you away.



You can't deny it is a risky choice to make.
Like Ini, I can and I will deny that it is a risky choice. you have more of a risk flying over the pacific ocean. You have more of a risk of dieing in a car accident. You have more of a risk of getting prostate cancer from some other source.

If you can't realize that, you are not cut out for life in Japan. I'm not trying to be mean, but that is the harsh reality of life. If you can't come to grips with the idea that Sendai isn't dangerous YOU WILL NOT SURVIVE LIFE IN JAPAN. Because the other problems and risks of living abroad will eat you alive.



I understand there is evidence to prove it is safe, and cities like New York and Paris have higher radiation levels than Sendai, but they don't have a damaged nuclear plant nearby.

baseless fears are baseless. New York is on the coast and could suffer a devestating flood and hurricane. Paris, is full of french people. a damaged nuclear plant that is highly studied and being decontaminated is the least of your concerns honey.



Please no more negative comments guys, I was just looking for support and I have received that from some so thank you.

just like earlier, if you can't handle any more negative comments you need to cancel coming to Japan and skip JET. If your skin is this thin, YOU WILL NOT SURVIVE LIVING IN JAPAN

If you think this is negative, you haven't seen anything yet...



I love Japan and want to participate in JET more than ever, I just wanted to make sure I am making an educated decision
do you love Japan? how do you know? if your love of "Japan" and the evidence and science isn't enough to convince you to come to Japan than don't come. Seriously... Someone else will gladly take the opportunity you will skip, and no one will give a shit but you. Make your own decision.
Come or Don't.

Jiggit
May 21st, 2014, 09:13
just like earlier, if you can't handle any more negative comments you need to cancel coming to Japan and skip JET. If your skin is this thin, YOU WILL NOT SURVIVE LIVING IN JAPAN

If you think this is negative, you haven't seen anything yet...


It probably seems like a stretch to newbies that the regulars keep saying that worrying about people being mean on the internet means you aren't suited for Japan, but it's true. If you get upset by something that small then you aren't going to handle the culture shock and possibly nasty things your BoE/Teachers/Local people will do to you. Bad things may happen to you here, extremely stressful thinks absolutely will happen to you. People need to be tough. They need to be able to deal with the fact that everything isn't going to be nice for them all the time. If you can't, you genuinely won't have a good time coming to Japan.

So I know these sentiments seems like unnecessary meanness but there's a lot of truth in them.

Page
May 21st, 2014, 12:17
The short version, monitoring of local food (and the area) is taken very seriously and published in city newsletters as well as online (I live hours away but it's done in mine, too). If you want to avoid food from the area all produce is required to list where it's from. And if that doesn't help here's a report from the UN: Cancer And Death by Radiation? Not From Fukushima - Forbes (http://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesconca/2014/05/04/cancer-and-death-by-radiation-not-from-fukushima/)

We can't (and don't want to) persuade anyone who's just looking for a reason not to come to Tohoku but there is absolutely no danger in living in Sendai (or in Fukushima, it's not like you're going to be ALTing in Daiichi or the danger zones).

Ini
May 21st, 2014, 12:24
eating the processed crap from 7/11 will give you cancer a lot quicker than eating any fresh food from fukushima.

therealwindycity
May 22nd, 2014, 10:17
Let's keep this thread on topic, guys. Good information about Fukushima is probably going to be important to a lot of incoming JETs.