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naginataonthebrain
January 14th, 2015, 07:04
Hey, I was just wondering what the ladies of ITIL were planning to wear to the interview. I have some nice dress pants from Ann Taylor but no blazer/blouse to go with it. Does anybody have ideas on what brands to look for? I'm flexible on price because this will be an investment but preferably something not over $500 (for a full suit). I'm busty and have wide shoulders, just fyi. Also, is dark navy blue a good color choice? Or should I stick to black and white?

ambrosse
January 14th, 2015, 07:12
I am pretty good with online shopping. My favorite place for business attire is Express. They recently had a huge sale and I got an entire suit for about $150 :) It's well-made and looks great.
If you're a Macy's kind of person (I love it), the Tahari brand has a good array of suits and they fit wonderfully and are a decent price.

I own a pants suit and a skirt suit, but also what I call a "dress suit."
It's a dress, but it looks like a skirt suit. It's pretty awesome. It has a nice little blazer that goes with it. I'm leaning toward wearing that. There have been some people iffy on wearing a dress to the interview, but I'd rather wear a professional, perfect fitting dress with a blazer than a suit that I feel makes me look stumpy.

My overall suggestion? Wear professional attire that makes you feel confident comfortable. :)

Edit: In addition, think about your shoes. They really do matter.

mrcharisma
January 14th, 2015, 08:59
I'm doing some interviews in Edinburgh this year and I'll be giving out extra points for female candidates who have made the effort to wear low-cut tops, tight skirts and stilettos. I think it's important that candidates dress appropriately.

The rule doesn't apply to frumps or boilers.

ambrosse
January 14th, 2015, 09:05
I'm doing some interviews in Edinburgh this year and I'll be giving out extra points for female candidates who have made the effort to wear low-cut tops, tight skirts and stilettos. I think it's important that candidates dress appropriately.

The rule doesn't apply to frumps or boilers.

Great point!
Wear what makes you feel confident, without having your bazoombas popping out or your ass hanging out. Wear sensible shoes. if you know you can't walk in heels, don't wear them. If you feel the need: Heel height? Keep it under 2.5 inches, yes?

OtherPulse
January 14th, 2015, 09:07
If it's your first suit and you're going to be laying down some serious money, I'd recommend black. It's more adaptable so you'll be able to match it with more shirt colours etc. Navy is a nice colour, but I'd recommend it secondary to black for a first suit.

Wasabi
January 14th, 2015, 10:04
The first year I interviewed, I work a black blazer with black dress pants and a while sleeveless blouse underneath. It wasn't a suit set per se, but it looked great together. I ended up being an alternate. When I interviewed last year, I bought a light grey pinstripe suit (YOLO) and wore a black sleeveless blouse underneath (I was shortlisted). I think it's important that whatever you buy looks great on you. I've seen people who showed a bit of personal style during the interviews make it in just fine. You will definitely want something dark (dark grey or black or navy) for when you get here, and it's never something that will be out of style.

Fantasylife
January 14th, 2015, 10:22
It will be a black or dark navy blue pants suit, brand new. I'll have to buy locally because I'm so small that small sizes tend to fit differently on me from brand to brand. I don't mind dropping some money on a new suit. I needed one anyway.

word
January 14th, 2015, 10:28
Get it fitted by a proper tailor. It'll look a thousand times better.

weepinbell
January 14th, 2015, 10:45
I am pretty good with online shopping. My favorite place for business attire is Express. They recently had a huge sale and I got an entire suit for about $150 :) It's well-made and looks great.
If you're a Macy's kind of person (I love it), the Tahari brand has a good array of suits and they fit wonderfully and are a decent price.

I own a pants suit and a skirt suit, but also what I call a "dress suit."
It's a dress, but it looks like a skirt suit. It's pretty awesome. It has a nice little blazer that goes with it. I'm leaning toward wearing that. There have been some people iffy on wearing a dress to the interview, but I'd rather wear a professional, perfect fitting dress with a blazer than a suit that I feel makes me look stumpy.

My overall suggestion? Wear professional attire that makes you feel confident comfortable. :)

Edit: In addition, think about your shoes. They really do matter.

I'm having such a hard time deciding if I want to wear my dress! I love it, but I'm not sure if it's 'professional' enough even though it's very conservative... yours sounds practical and comfortable, ugh I need something like that. I'm much more comfortable in a dress.

Home | Gap (http://www.gap.com/browse/product.do?cid=1022587&vid=1&pid=989081022)

literally it's that dress but in grey with a black colorblock around the skirt. It's at knee length for me and I wear it with an indigo-y blue blazer, black tights, and black heels.

Opinions? I'm going shopping to look for more potential outfits, too... but I do love this outfit!

Jiggit
January 14th, 2015, 10:49
I think "conservative but maybe not professional enough" is an apt description.

It could be fine. On the other hand do you want to be the only one not wearing a full suit? I'm not sure how it is for women but if I were in that situation I would not.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 14th, 2015, 10:55
Lose some... oh, goddamnit Word!

Uh... don't wear orange. And whatever suit you choose, make sure it covers up your Tuxedo mask tattoo.

Zolrak 22
January 14th, 2015, 10:59
I don't know enough about fashion, but that dress says to me night out on the town more than it says business professional.

ambrosse
January 14th, 2015, 11:06
I agree with Zolrak on this one. The dress is cute and it's simple and relatively conservative, however, it doesn't really scream total professional either. It's a tad bit casual.
Maybe look around for some pants/skirt suits or perhaps a two piece suit (aka what I call a "dress suit") if you like wearing dresses :)

weepinbell
January 14th, 2015, 11:20
It's fitted and actually doesn't look casual on me..... However. I literally just tried it on again and I look like I'm going to a tea party in it because the skirt is so ridiculously frilly lol. I also tried on an a-line skirt that needs to be re-hemmed so I think I might just do that, wear it with a black/white blouse and my indigo blazer and call it a day.

Unless I accidentally find something super cute while shopping. TBD.

Thanks so much everyone! :)

AyaReiko
January 14th, 2015, 11:22
Last year there was major snow the day of my interview and I ended up not even removing my red boots. I still got on the waiting list, apparently.
Apart from that, I had a dark blue skirt suit and a pale blue blouse. I have to admit that, this year, I will probably get a black suit and have it fitted, but stick with a coloured shirt. I can always wear the blue one when I get the job!

I always wonder, though, do we even get "graded" on what we wear?

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 14th, 2015, 11:27
I always wonder, though, do we even get "graded" on what we wear?

It probably depends. I went to my interview in a scarf and tweed jacket, because I'm a $£%£&$, and nobody minded at all. I just dressed in what I normally wore to teach. Note that I'm not suggesting this, of course - just saying it worked for me.

Plus, it was a cold day.

jenzor
January 14th, 2015, 13:48
While this is similar to the whole "what should I wear debacle", what about nails? I like getting mine done because my normal nails are usually pretty haggard looking (nail biting, I know bad habit. Must break.) Do you think a short french manicure would be acceptable, or dare I say maybe a subdued neutral color? I don't think they'll be looking at my hands all the time, I just want to make sure I'm professional looking from head to toe, or fingers, in this case.

word
January 14th, 2015, 13:55
I would say a stay away from color, keep them trimmed as short as you can comfortably have them and nicely manicured.

In schools, most women do not wear color and keep their nails trimmed very short. A few "bad" girls wear color and have a little length, but no teacher in her right mind would dare do such a thing.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 14th, 2015, 14:02
I would say a stay away from color, keep them trimmed as short as you can comfortably have them and nicely manicured.

In schools, most women do not wear color and keep their nails trimmed very short. A few "bad" girls wear color and have a little length, but no teacher in her right mind would dare do such a thing.

Slight addendum - decorative nail art is becoming slightly more popular around here, it seems. Still, not exactly what I would suggest wearing to an interview.

SailorZorro
January 14th, 2015, 14:21
I've been going through my closet to decide on an interview outfit as well. I wear professional dresses to work almost everyday and will likely wear one of those. I know most people are getting new items, but I already have so many I don't feel the need. I think, rather I am going to look for a new pair of shoes (I wear boots a lot during the winter, but they're probably not appropriate for the interview). I know people have mixed feelings about stores like JCP, but their Worthington line has great items and you can spend your money getting it altered if you need. Ladies, please don't forget proper foundation. Rather than spending $500 on a suit and then not wearing appropriate garments underneath, spend your money there. It'll help the clothing lay correctly on your body. And please don't think it's about your size (meaning smaller women don't need it); it's about the type of material, the cut of the fabric, and how it lays on your body. If I'm ever in doubt, I take the outfit to the store with me and try on the foundation/undergarments with the outfit to see how it will look. This is not the time to have VPL or spillage. :p

greyjoy
January 14th, 2015, 14:38
Jesus, you don't have to whitewash your entire personality for an interview. A little color is just fine.

Tailoring a cheap suit is still cheap and will look better than an in tailored suit of a classier designer. Buy used clothing. Get measured, check out eBay and second hand shops. I bought one brand new suit for way too much money compared to the ten other suits and sports coats that I got second hand for practically pennies. They're nicer designers and better cut for me especially after being tailored.

Nobody cares what you're wearing so long as you have clearly made the effort. Even that dress above could work on the right body with a cardigan and a belt.

sharpinthefang
January 14th, 2015, 15:00
Just think about is in the same way you would any job interview. Wear the same to the interview that got you last hired at. (Within reason of course)

Ini
January 14th, 2015, 15:08
I worked for hooters....

itsabird
January 14th, 2015, 16:01
Speaking of colors (one page back), I planned to wear a pink tie, was told by everyone it didn't look professional enough. Got to my interview... The damn coordinator was wearing a pink tie! What gives!?

greyjoy
January 14th, 2015, 16:02
Just think about is in the same way you would any job interview. Wear the same to the interview that got you last hired at. (Within reason of course)

The fact that she's talking about buying a suit indicates that, like probably half of the interviewees, this is her first real interview. How many interviews did you go to before settling for phoning Interac in your pants at home one afternoon?

mothy
January 14th, 2015, 16:05
Groupjoy is feisty today.

word
January 14th, 2015, 16:08
Speaking of colors (one page back), I planned to wear a pink tie, was told by everyone it didn't look professional enough. Got to my interview... The damn coordinator was wearing a pink tie! What gives!?You'll note that in my advice thread, I encourage people to wear a slightly flashier tie, and that the ex-JET on my panel was also wearing a slightly unusual tie. I think dudes who show up in boring ties are boring and I would be less likely to hire one of them. A tie is a socially acceptable way to express yourself. It just needs to be done intelligently. Pink? Okay. Naruto? GTFO.

Jiggit
January 14th, 2015, 16:09
I think people who express themselves by wearing zany ties are boring. So YMMV.

itsabird
January 14th, 2015, 16:10
You'll note that in my advice thread, I encourage people to wear a slightly flashier tie, and that the ex-JET on my panel was also wearing a slightly unusual tie. I think dudes who show up in boring ties are boring and I would be less likely to hire one of them. A tie is a socially acceptable way to express yourself. It just needs to be done intelligently. Pink? Okay. Naruto? GTFO.
Yeah I remember reading your post and considering it... But the peer pressure was just too strong and I caved :[ lol.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 14th, 2015, 16:39
Groupjoy is feisty today.

It's all the coffee.

On the subject of ties, distinctive doesn't have to mean zany. You can wear an attractive patterned without coming across like a moron.

greyjoy
January 14th, 2015, 16:44
I think people who express themselves by wearing zany ties are boring. So YMMV.

Do you consider ties that aren't a solid neutral color to be zany though? There's a mile between a loud tricolor tie and a snoopy tie after all.

I don't remember which tie I wore to my interview. I do remember opting against a pocket square. I probably could have pulled it off that day. My interview panel was two women.

Jiggit
January 14th, 2015, 17:35
It's not about the physical wearing of the tie, it's the mindset going into it.

naginataonthebrain
January 15th, 2015, 00:21
The fact that she's talking about buying a suit indicates that, like probably half of the interviewees, this is her first real interview. How many interviews did you go to before settling for phoning Interac in your pants at home one afternoon?

Right on the money, greyjoy. I've had job interviews before but they all have been on the phone/skype. This is my first legit in-person interview.

ambrosse
January 15th, 2015, 00:35
Right on the money, greyjoy. I've had job interviews before but they all have been on the phone/skype. This is my first legit in-person interview.

Ah, that's nerve-wracking! But I'm sure you'll be just fine :)
My first real in-person interview was when I applied for a library tech position at a local middle school. As I was walking back to the interview room with the principal, he said "Oh, there's someone else here to interview you as well!"
Most US consulates have a 3-person panel that we know of ahead of time which is lovely.

naginataonthebrain
January 15th, 2015, 00:39
I am pretty good with online shopping. My favorite place for business attire is Express. They recently had a huge sale and I got an entire suit for about $150 :) It's well-made and looks great.
If you're a Macy's kind of person (I love it), the Tahari brand has a good array of suits and they fit wonderfully and are a decent price.

I own a pants suit and a skirt suit, but also what I call a "dress suit."
It's a dress, but it looks like a skirt suit. It's pretty awesome. It has a nice little blazer that goes with it. I'm leaning toward wearing that. There have been some people iffy on wearing a dress to the interview, but I'd rather wear a professional, perfect fitting dress with a blazer than a suit that I feel makes me look stumpy.

My overall suggestion? Wear professional attire that makes you feel confident comfortable. :)

Edit: In addition, think about your shoes. They really do matter.

Ah, I forgot about EXPRESS. I'll take a gander after work. And my aunt (who owns a boutique up in Boston) was telling me that I should check out Tahari as well. Thanks for the advice!

Zolrak 22
January 15th, 2015, 00:41
I'm from a tropical island, so our business attire is more casual.

(Unless you are applying for a serious blue collar job)

As such this is the first time I'll be interviewed while wearing a suit.

On one hand it's freeing to know you won't be judged that differently from others, on the other.... I'm in dire need of a better suit [emoji29]

naginataonthebrain
January 15th, 2015, 00:48
Ah, that's nerve-wracking! But I'm sure you'll be just fine :)
My first real in-person interview was when I applied for a library tech position at a local middle school. As I was walking back to the interview room with the principal, he said "Oh, there's someone else here to interview you as well!"
Most US consulates have a 3-person panel that we know of ahead of time which is lovely.

Ok, actually, now that I think about, I have done an in-person interview before (at a company called zulily) but it wasn't anything too serious and it was only with one person. Even though it does seem daunting, I think I'm actually looking forward to the three person interview style? More people will provide a subjective view...because you never know if somebody is having a bad day or something.

ambrosse
January 15th, 2015, 00:53
Ok, actually, now that I think about, I have done an in-person interview before (at a company called zulily) but it wasn't anything too serious and it was only with one person. Even though it does seem daunting, I think I'm actually looking forward to the three person interview style? More people will provide a subjective view...because you never know if somebody is having a bad day or something.

Very true!
I find having more people to talk to easier. It's nice to have more than one face to focus on rather than just one.

Cbill1
January 15th, 2015, 11:09
It's not about the physical wearing of the tie, it's the mindset going into it.

This.

A person with good posture (who looks confident) in an ill-fitting suit will probably leave a better impression than someone with awful posture (who does not look confident) in a perfectly tailored suit.

word
January 15th, 2015, 11:46
I think people who express themselves by wearing zany ties are boring. So YMMV.


It's not about the physical wearing of the tie, it's the mindset going into it.I get this, honestly, but I also kinda think along these lines:


Do you consider ties that aren't a solid neutral color to be zany though? There's a mile between a loud tricolor tie and a snoopy tie after all. It was just that, at my interview, every dude was wearing either a red, blue, or red-and-blue striped tie. They might as well have all been the same person. Hell, one of the other dudes who made it through was wearing this f*cking ridiculouse light brown, ill-fitting corduroy suit (admittedly, his acceptance into the program seemed to involve some alarming elements of nepotism, but still). I just remember thinking about this as I questioned my own tie (pale yellow with a relatively conservative graphic design), saw everyone else's tie, saw my interviewer's vivid green striped tie... I dunno. I could be wrong.


A person with good posture (who looks confident) in an ill-fitting suit will probably leave a better impression than someone with awful posture (who does not look confident) in a perfectly tailored suit.This is also true, I think. As I said in that other thread, get into character early. Be f*cking confident (but not arrogant).

Jiggit
January 15th, 2015, 11:53
There's also the conundrum of whether you wear what you generally think is more professional or try to guess what would work best for the specific interview. What you're saying is that you would want to stand out by wearing something that distinguishes you from other people but maybe that wouldn't be a great idea since most of the interviewers are Japanese. If word were interviewing you'd be better off but if I were interviewing you'd be worse off.

Another one would be suit colour. I would say a black suit is less appropriate for an interview as they're far too sombre, and navy blue or charcoal grey are more appropriate. But a lot of people (especially in Japan) think black is the most professional and "smart" regardless of context. Japan has a lot of weird ideas about professional attire, which is why you get the principal in morning dress and all the teachers wearing white neckties. They're wearing western formalwear but they've invented their own nonsensical standards that a westerner would never be able to guess.

Ini
January 15th, 2015, 11:54
I wouldnt get too obsessed with what you wear. I remember back in the mists of time when the Baron and I were at London pre-departure orientation and some clown turned up to the embassy reception in a suit he bought from a charity shop for a couple of quid. I think an old man had died in it.

ambrosse
January 15th, 2015, 12:05
I feel like there should be a thread devoted to ties...

JestersJ
January 15th, 2015, 15:49
I was going for black suit dress just past my knees to be more conservative, with a matching navy blazer to break up the black, giving it a slightly lighter look and a pair of black women's business loafers.

I have had interviews for luxury resorts and received the jobs as well. (I think for that interview I was wearing a blue suit dress with a dark grey blazer. And then during orientation I wore black slacks with a white top with the navy blazer)
I currently work in marketing for luxury real estate (expeeensive homes, you gotta look nice to the interview for that.) I interviewed for that in the same blue suit dress with dark grey blazer. Wore just black flats with these interviews and dark tights (got a small tattoo on my ankle that I just think is nicer to hide for job interviews)

I bought new stuff for the jet interview but keeping with my same pattern, seemed to be good for me in the past. I'm throwing back and forth if I want to wear a suit dress or slacks for this interview though.

itsabird
January 15th, 2015, 16:11
I just remember thinking about this as I questioned my own tie (pale yellow with a relatively conservative graphic design), saw everyone else's tie, saw my interviewer's vivid green striped tie... I dunno. I could be wrong.

Yeah. Just another tidbit of advice I got. I was talking to someone Miami and they had said they wouldn't have cared what type of color tie you wore. It wouldn't have mattered that much. This is probably (this is my thought now) because they just want to see how you are as a person, not how you dress. This person Miami also made it clear that within reason is a good idea. I had longer hair when I was going to apply, asked if I should cut it, and he said it might look better to the conservative Japanese business people because of their mindset. So just keep that in mind. That it's the same as the application review. YMMV and it depends on who you get to interview you.

Jiggit
January 15th, 2015, 16:17
Eh. I've said it before but when coordinators says stuff like that you kind of have to take it with a pinch of salt. I mean it's not like he's gonna say "oh yeah we totally judge applicants based on their clothing rather than their skillset" is he?

Besides which a lot of the judgements we make on people's appearances are subconscious. Isn't there something out there about how interviewers usually make their minds up about whether they want to employ someone in a ridiculously short amount of time from the start of the interview? First impressions are everything.

And even if he's being completely honest, the ex ALT would be the last person on the panel I'd be worried about when choosing my clothing.

daisychain
January 15th, 2015, 18:18
I remember in my first interview I work a navy blue ladies suit from Next - the skirt was about knee length and the jacket didn't button up (it's a strange style but looks really smart!) and I wore a white shirt underneath which had a high neckline. My shoes were black heels (small heels, mind..) which tie up via a bow. I was worried that wouldn't be okay but I was accepted :)

I had done a lot of research before hand thanks the forums and tbh I get wanting to stand out - but I have a feeling you will make that same "stand out" impression if you look smart and tidy, and not *too* out there. I personally would have felt more uncomfortable not wearing a suit.

That said, the girl I interviewed with wore a long brown floaty skirt and a velvet blazer - I don't know how she did but we certainly looked different in the waiting room.

Shincantsen
January 15th, 2015, 23:36
I feel like from this thread's perspective the interviewers just have a sheet of paper that says "Do you think they are dressed appropriately? Y/N" and that's the only question. Your outfit can set the tone of the interview, but it isn't the most important thing. Look neat, put-together, and professional and then stop worrying. I wore a suit where the blazer was held together with a (discreet) safety pin, and I got in (and I promise there was no nepotism involved).

weepinbell
January 16th, 2015, 01:42
I feel like from this thread's perspective the interviewers just have a sheet of paper that says "Do you think they are dressed appropriately? Y/N" and that's the only question. Your outfit can set the tone of the interview, but it isn't the most important thing. Look neat, put-together, and professional and then stop worrying. I wore a suit where the blazer was held together with a (discreet) safety pin, and I got in (and I promise there was no nepotism involved).

Good because I might have to tape my skirt's hemline lol. Thanks for the reminder, I feel like sometimes us girls worry so much about this kind of stuff but you're right... probably not going to be the most important thing unless you're like hanging out all over or in jeans haha.

SailorZorro
January 16th, 2015, 02:25
Good because I might have to tape my skirt's hemline lol. .

weepinbell, this is completely acceptable for ANY circumstance. Just get the right tape/hem bond/stitch witchery or whatever for the material. I don't know why people think hems have to be sewn; finished - yes, sewn - no. Let me know if you need help picking out the right one. Not a huge fan of the double sided tape because it's harder to correct mistakes, but some materials are better off not ironed.

weepinbell
January 16th, 2015, 03:28
weepinbell, this is completely acceptable for ANY circumstance. Just get the right tape/hem bond/stitch witchery or whatever for the material. I don't know why people think hems have to be sewn; finished - yes, sewn - no. Let me know if you need help picking out the right one. Not a huge fan of the double sided tape because it's harder to correct mistakes, but some materials are better off not ironed.

Thanks!! Yeah, my sister has some fabric tape, so I might try that first. I think it might be double sided though. Idk if it doesn't work, I may just get it fixed at the drycleaners up the street and it'll be like 8$ to fix so either way, not much outta my bank account. I was thinking of getting a whole new outfit, but I really like the one I have picked out from my own closet... the only problem is the damn hemline, which just came undone in the front. Easy fix.

OtherPulse
January 16th, 2015, 03:41
I swear this is so much easier for guys.

Do you have a suit?
Yes - Good.
No - Go buy one.

Zolrak 22
January 16th, 2015, 03:43
I swear this is so much easier for guys.

Do you have a suit?
Yes - Good.
No - Go buy one.
Option #3
Get a better fitting suit.

OtherPulse
January 16th, 2015, 03:47
That's just a sub-class of option two :P

Zolrak 22
January 16th, 2015, 03:50
That's just a sub-class of option two [emoji14]
Whatever happened to being a genderless horse? [emoji14]

coop52
January 16th, 2015, 07:14
One of my suit jacket buttons popped off during the interview, and I still got in. It was a really cheap suit from TJ Max.

Jiggit
January 16th, 2015, 08:42
I swear this is so much easier for guys.

Do you have a suit?
Yes - Good.
No - Go buy one.

Only because most Western guys care so little about clothing. Getting a suit that fits properly without getting it order made is a nightmare. Most men just wear ill-fitting suits without anyone realising it sadly.

Japanese men care more btw. 99% of ALTs look incredibly shabby by Japanese standards. There will be Japanese judges on the panel. You do the math.

word
January 16th, 2015, 08:58
Most men just wear ill-fitting suits without anyone realising it sadly. word


Japanese men care more btw. 99% of ALTs look incredibly shabby by Japanese standards.word

Hell, I know this and I *still* tend to look incredibly shabby by Japanese standards. I try but fashion has never been my strong suit, unfortunately.

OtherPulse
January 16th, 2015, 09:38
Only because most Western guys care so little about clothing. Getting a suit that fits properly without getting it order made is a nightmare. Most men just wear ill-fitting suits without anyone realising it sadly.

Japanese men care more btw. 99% of ALTs look incredibly shabby by Japanese standards. There will be Japanese judges on the panel. You do the math.
If I reached my twenties and I still didn't know how to dress myself well, then I would be very disappointed in myself.
Fortunately, I'm far too vain to not care about appearances :P

PuddingHead
January 16th, 2015, 09:45
Fortunately, I'm far too vain to not care about appearances

Thank goodness! Can't have unkempt horses around here.

Edit: Even horses would look good in suits. Everyone, stick with suits and you'll be fine.

OtherPulse
January 16th, 2015, 10:03
Look at those glasses. Do those look like the glasses of someone who doesn't dress to make women swoon?

PuddingHead
January 16th, 2015, 10:16
And that sax! Who doesn't think the sax is sexy?

Edit: You, too, dear reader, will have all the confidence of a saxaphone playing horse if you feel confident in whatever you're wearing. Don't sweat it too much.

Libellule
January 16th, 2015, 14:04
Good because I might have to tape my skirt's hemline lol. Thanks for the reminder, I feel like sometimes us girls worry so much about this kind of stuff but you're right... probably not going to be the most important thing unless you're like hanging out all over or in jeans haha.

I totally understand over-worrying about what you'll wear! I ended up wearing black dress pants, a black cardigan, and a colourful printed silk blouse to my interview. The ex-JET on the panel was wearing a magenta blazer and cream top (don't remember her bottoms). I think you'll be fine whatever you wear as long as it's professional and fits well as many others have pointed out.

I bought a proper suit but I have yet to wear the blazer, although I'm sure I'll have to wear it at graduation ceremonies or whatever. I usually wear dresses like the one you posted earlier to school. I was lucky that my pred is a girl and was able to offer good advice about what to wear.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 16th, 2015, 14:36
Thank goodness! Can't have unkempt horses around here.

Veering a little too far off topic for the current thread, but I'm happy to cut this part of the discussion and rinstate in the lounge if you want to keep a-jawin about horses. :)

Zolrak 22
January 16th, 2015, 14:43
And that sax! Who doesn't think the sax is sexy?

I'm more of a guitar guy myself. [emoji14]


When drifting off-topic, remember to add a little relevant info at the end.

For example, now that I said some random comment.


One of my suit jacket buttons popped off during the interview, and I still got in. It was a really cheap suit from TJ Max.

I guess it's more about how you wear it.

They are aware that most of the applicants are recent graduates.

We usually have little to no money to spend on suits.

You can't seriously expect us to have a $600 suit or something like that.

So they'll probably give you a little slack in that department...

itsabird
January 16th, 2015, 15:03
So they'll probably give you a little slack in that department...
4997.

PuddingHead
January 16th, 2015, 19:07
I fixed them both! Look how on topic I am now.

Edit: My suit will probably be... blue.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 16th, 2015, 20:41
I fixed them both! Look how on topic I am now.

You definitely are! I applaud your attention to detail. :)

I wore tweed, but I am a man.

PuddingHead
January 16th, 2015, 20:55
Girls can wear tweed! It's just so itchy.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 16th, 2015, 21:33
It was more of a commentary on how I'm not really the intended audience of the thread...

ambrosse
January 16th, 2015, 22:24
Girls can wear tweed! It's just so itchy.

A tweed suit is a beautiful suit, but I can't afford one just yet.

Zolrak 22
January 17th, 2015, 01:18
Girls can wear tweed! It's just so itchy.
Being sick in a suit is not fine! [emoji14]

naginataonthebrain
January 17th, 2015, 01:24
Finally bought a pant suit, blouse and heels for the interview (ended up finding some nice stuff at Banana Republic on sale). Glad that part is over with....now if only the Atlanta consulate would get back to me and tell me when my interview date and time is!

ambrosse
January 17th, 2015, 01:46
Finally bought a pant suit, blouse and heels for the interview (ended up finding some nice stuff at Banana Republic on sale). Glad that part is over with....now if only the Atlanta consulate would get back to me and tell me when my interview date and time is!

I recently bought a new pair of heels too for my two piece suit. I'm working on breaking them in.

Atlanta's taking a lot of time. Chicago interviewees already know their interview details including the voucher.

PuddingHead
January 17th, 2015, 01:49
Atlanta's taking a lot of time. Chicago interviewees already know their interview details including the voucher.

Same with Miami. Couldn't choose a time, but you could request a date and I got the one I wanted. So, hooray~

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 17th, 2015, 02:08
Finally bought a pant suit, blouse and heels for the interview (ended up finding some nice stuff at Banana Republic on sale)

Colour?

naginataonthebrain
January 17th, 2015, 02:15
Colour?

Black ​like the color of my soul

naginataonthebrain
January 17th, 2015, 02:33
But I got this really nice white, long sleeved blouse with a thin black trim down the middle. It's giving me major Janelle Monae vibes (aka I love it).

Perilwink
January 17th, 2015, 02:35
It's giving me major Janelle Monae vibes (aka I love it).

Ahhhh that sounds awesome! Much more exciting than my whole ensemble.

PuddingHead
January 17th, 2015, 02:40
But I got this really nice white, long sleeved blouse with a thin black trim down the middle. It's giving me major Janelle Monae vibes (aka I love it).

Oooh, that actually sounds pretty adorable. Good choice.

PuddingHead
January 17th, 2015, 12:16
I caved and bought a skirt suit because I am a part of the collective and there's no point fighting it.

PuddingHead
January 17th, 2015, 12:18
4997.

No one commented on this, so I'm letting you know that I appreciated it.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 17th, 2015, 14:48
No one commented on this, so I'm letting you know that I appreciated it.

Awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

I like it when the newbies are nice to each other.

Zolrak 22
January 17th, 2015, 16:16
Awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww

I like it when the newbies are nice to each other.
[emoji173] [emoji173] [emoji173]

You can feel the love in the air.

PuddingHead
January 17th, 2015, 23:23
You can feel the love in the air.

Caaaan you feeeeel the loooooove tonight? ♫♪

Antonath
January 17th, 2015, 23:24
Caaaan you feeeeel the loooooove tonight? ♫♪
Don't give people excuses to post that picture from the Lounge!

word
January 17th, 2015, 23:33
Caaaan you feeeeel the loooooove tonight? ♫♪Yeah I can feel it...

http://www.lionking.org/imgarchive/Act_2/Nala.jpg


Don't give people excuses to post that picture from the Lounge!too late

Zolrak 22
January 17th, 2015, 23:50
God dang it, Word!

PuddingHead
January 18th, 2015, 00:10
I was going to, but I didn't want to be that guy.

Elysi
January 18th, 2015, 13:15
Bought my suit today! Decided to go with a black skirt suit with a lilac-ish button up shirt to wear with it. Anyone think that's a bad idea? I have pants and a white button up shirt as a backup.

Also if anyone has a The Limited near them they're having a 50% off everything sale right now. Not sure how long it's going to last.

word
January 18th, 2015, 13:39
I don't think it's a bad idea. Black and white are usually not very flattering, especially on lighter skin tones. Lilac is probably a better choice, and more interesting, anyway.

If you're fat, I recommend the pants over the skirt. I sound like a jerk when I say this kinda thing, but I don't think I'm wrong, either. Skirt-suits are unflattering on apple- (and pear)-shaped women; they tend to result in appearance that evokes an image of the hippos from Fantasia.

Elysi
January 18th, 2015, 13:53
Thanks for the input. I've worn a skirt/blouse combo in my previous job and got a lot of complements, so I'll probably go with that. Not saying I'm a size 0, but I don't consider myself fat. I'm still going to get everything tailored and see what looks best though.

project_4
January 18th, 2015, 14:03
When I got news of my interview a couple years ago, I obsessed over what to wear -- just a way of redirecting my anxiety towards something I could control. Being extra petite (5'0" and 90lbs) I decided on ordering online a Japanese women's suit set (jacket, pants and matching skirt) in the smallest size. It cost about $160. It was still too big, go figure. I wore a plain white blouse underneath, nude stockings and 4" plain black pumps (my clubbing shoes, so although well-worn they're super comfortable!). I was shortlisted.

Looking back, though, it really didn't matter as much as I had expected. The day of, I saw men wearing dress shirts ranging from white to baby blue, all colours of ties, and suits that ranged from meticulous and well-fitted to sloppy and over-large. There was black, navy, charcoal grey and even khaki. The ladies were dressed in skirts and pants (with blazers). There were all colours of tops, some blouses and others sweater/blouse combinations. Being Asian and dressed in the typical "salaryman/woman" manner, I actually felt somewhat bland and forgettable. So long as your attire compliments a great interview and doesn't detract from it, you'll be fine I think.

The advice that I came across on the old JET forums was what guided my final choice and what I would repeat is to dress confidently. Dress to feel great. Whether that means splurging on a new set (invest wisely!) or reaching for an older but comfortable combination, just make sure that it reflects YOU and that you feel awesome wearing it. Though I felt a little self-conscious being not as colourful as the other interviewees, I wouldn't have changed my outfit because at the time, I felt like I truly looked the part. I still get regular use out of that blazer and skirt on ceremony days. If you don't wear make-up, don't feel like you suddenly need to.

Don't worry too much about the tiny details, like how much eyeshadow and what kind of earrings or hair style. Just be sensible and make sure you look good, bringing out your best assets. Let's be frank here, good-looking people are universally well received everywhere they go. So smile, too! I painted my nails a neutral light pink, but if they were fire engine red I doubt the panel would have noticed.

I dressed the same for Tokyo Orientation and was surprised to see the variations in "professional attire" from all the different countries. UK folks seemed to set the standard when it came to well-tailored and matching ensembles, but I still saw a smattering of oddly dyed hair, big hoop or excessively dangly earrings, mini-MINI skirts, suits that looked like pyjamas and ties that The Salvation Army couldn't get anyone to take for free. Just goes to show that, for better or for worse, what you look like will not make or break your interview.

PuddingHead
January 18th, 2015, 23:06
If you're fat, I recommend the pants over the skirt. I sound like a jerk when I say this kinda thing, but I don't think I'm wrong, either. Skirt-suits are unflattering on apple- (and pear)-shaped women; they tend to result in appearance that evokes an image of the hippos from Fantasia.

I'm always curious as to what your cutoff is when you talk about fat people. Are you talking kinda chubby or do you mean like, clinically overweight? Visual aids are always appreciated.

Zolrak 22
January 18th, 2015, 23:23
I'm always curious as to what your cutoff is when you talk about fat people.

Be careful what you ask/wish for. [emoji6]

AyaReiko
January 19th, 2015, 02:06
I always wonder if the interview suit for CIRs matter more than the ones for ALTs, since they work in actual offices. All the former ALTs I've asked this about tell me they pretty much never wore suits at work in schools.

Zolrak 22
January 19th, 2015, 02:14
All the former ALTs I've asked this about tell me they pretty much never wore suits at work in schools.

ESID, some places allow casual wear, others even allow jumpsuits, but some expect you to use suits.

Still, it doesn't hurt to have a nice suit for official events and the like.

OtherPulse
January 19th, 2015, 02:59
I always wonder if the interview suit for CIRs matter more than the ones for ALTs, since they work in actual offices. All the former ALTs I've asked this about tell me they pretty much never wore suits at work in schools.
I hope I get to wear a suit in school. I love wearing a suit.

Zolrak 22
January 19th, 2015, 03:39
I hope I get to wear a suit in school. I love wearing a suit.
I doubt they'll dislike you for over dressing.

Under dressing, now there's the problem.

(Personally, I've had enough of wearing suits [emoji14])

Edit : You can always ask your predecessor if they are okay with it.

OtherPulse
January 19th, 2015, 04:38
No overdressing eyy? I'm going to show up in coattails and a top hat.

Zolrak 22
January 19th, 2015, 05:01
No overdressing eyy? I'm going to show up in coattails and a top hat.
How delightfully quaint. [emoji145] [emoji122]

OtherPulse
January 19th, 2015, 07:14
Well I will be an ambassador of British culture. They didn't specify what period of British culture.

Zolrak 22
January 19th, 2015, 08:30
Well I will be an ambassador of British culture. They didn't specify what period of British culture.
Oh, oh, oh!

Does this mean I can represent the tribal tendencies of my people?

That'd be magnificent.

I can start by getting the kids to worship the Sun.

And finish by making a human sacrifice out of a false God.

*eyes Snow*

http://sh1.webring.com/people/sk/katlpablo/imagenes/soltaino_2.gif

All hail the glow cloud!

I mean, the Sun!

OtherPulse
January 19th, 2015, 08:33
I'm going to the interview in my finest set of plate mail.

greyjoy
January 19th, 2015, 09:49
No overdressing eyy? I'm going to show up in coattails and a top hat.

Wearing your evening wear before 6 pm is a sartorial sin in every country.

You'll get just as many remarks and looks for being slightly overdressed as you will slightly underdressed. At my JHS, most people wear track suits or maybe just a button up shirt with no tie or jacket. A few regular teachers wear suits every day. I wouldn't look out of place wearing a suit if I was a full fledged teacher, but as I'm not, I feel dressing down a bit lowers the barrier between me and the students. They actually comment on my outfits, whereas my teachers just ignore them.
At ES, nobody except the administration wears suits, and I would definitely stick out there.

Since you'll arrive in summer, almost everyone will be dressed in a wife beater and daisy dukes anyway, so you can sort of gradually scale your perception of your schools' dress codes.

naginataonthebrain
January 20th, 2015, 02:06
I don't think it's a bad idea. Black and white are usually not very flattering, especially on lighter skin tones. Lilac is probably a better choice, and more interesting, anyway.

If you're fat, I recommend the pants over the skirt. I sound like a jerk when I say this kinda thing, but I don't think I'm wrong, either. Skirt-suits are unflattering on apple- (and pear)-shaped women; they tend to result in appearance that evokes an image of the hippos from Fantasia.

Yeah, even when I was my most fit (145 lbs of lean muscle at 5'5), I didn't feel like I could rock the skirt suit combo because of my pear shape figure. So I totally get what you're saying word. Some body builds can pull off certain styles better than others.

starfish
January 20th, 2015, 17:26
Speaking of colors (one page back), I planned to wear a pink tie, was told by everyone it didn't look professional enough. Got to my interview... The damn coordinator was wearing a pink tie! What gives!?

The coordinator just didn't GAF. Pink is not inherently a professional color for a tie (it's for weddings, gay men and other associations with femininity) and frankly, white people have no business wearing pink in the first place. It makes them look like they're wearing a salmon.


You'll note that in my advice thread, I encourage people to wear a slightly flashier tie, and that the ex-JET on my panel was also wearing a slightly unusual tie. I think dudes who show up in boring ties are boring and I would be less likely to hire one of them. A tie is a socially acceptable way to express yourself. It just needs to be done intelligently. Pink? Okay. Naruto? GTFO.

In a professional setting, ties do not exist to be a personal statement or expression; they're meant to complement the rest of your outfit. If your tie is bold enough to draw attention, you're doing it wrong. Unless you're trying to be flamboyant, in which case feel free to wear pink, but your personality better complement your tie or you'll look like a fool.


I was talking to someone Miami and they had said they wouldn't have cared what type of color tie you wore. It wouldn't have mattered that much. This is probably (this is my thought now) because they just want to see how you are as a person, not how you dress. This person Miami also made it clear that within reason is a good idea.

Tie color may not have much weight in and of itself, but the way you dress does say a lot about who you are as a person. You want them focused on your stage presence, what you have to say, and how you are as a person-- not noticing your inability to dress yourself.

uthinkimlost?
January 20th, 2015, 17:34
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-j3CEHzAqrx0/UbnSCloUFEI/AAAAAAAAFhs/OBxp1dQx6Wg/s1600/Tim+Gunn.jpg

word
January 20th, 2015, 17:57
The coordinator just didn't GAF. Pink is not inherently a professional color for a tie (it's for weddings, gay men and other associations with femininity) and frankly, white people have no business wearing pink in the first place. It makes them look like they're wearing a salmon.I don't disagree that white people shouldn't wear pink, but you have some weird issues with gender/sexuality stereotyping.


In a professional setting, ties do not exist to be a personal statement or expression; they're meant to complement the rest of your outfit. If your tie is bold enough to draw attention, you're doing it wrong. Unless you're trying to be flamboyant, in which case feel free to wear pink, but your personality better complement your tie or you'll look like a fool.You're from the east coast of the US, aren't you?

Jiggit
January 20th, 2015, 18:06
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-j3CEHzAqrx0/UbnSCloUFEI/AAAAAAAAFhs/OBxp1dQx6Wg/s1600/Tim+Gunn.jpg

Oh man, Tim Gunn. The fashion consultant who doesn't know how to wear anything other than a suit.

starfish
January 21st, 2015, 07:46
I don't disagree that white people shouldn't wear pink, but you have some weird issues with gender/sexuality stereotyping.

You're from the east coast of the US, aren't you?

Not really. Pink's a chick color. If someone's going to sport it, they need to own it.

And yes.


Oh man, Tim Gunn. The fashion consultant who doesn't know how to wear anything other than a suit.

To be fair, men's fashion is rather simplistic. Sometimes I consider getting a sex change just to have more wardrobe options.

Zolrak 22
January 21st, 2015, 07:56
Pink is the color of blood, associated with war and manliness.

Or it was... back in the day. [emoji14]

As for men's fashion being simplistic... I'd like to point you to all the fashion designers that say otherwise. [emoji41]

uthinkimlost?
January 21st, 2015, 07:57
Not really. Pink's a chick color. If someone's going to sport it, they need to own it.

I now hear your internet voice as this:
http://whoseeksfinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/James-Gandolfini.jpg

Jiggit
January 21st, 2015, 08:47
To be fair, men's fashion is rather simplistic. Sometimes I consider getting a sex change just to have more wardrobe options.

Not really. American (and English) white men are the worst and most unimaginative dressers on the planet. Probably because they limit themselves by saying things like "pink's a chick color" because we're so homophobic.

mothy
January 21st, 2015, 08:49
In honor of stabflesh, I'm wearing a tie with some pink in it to work today.

Ini
January 21st, 2015, 08:51
I spilt some ketchup on my trousers a few days ago and it sort of looks pinkish now. does that count?

word
January 21st, 2015, 09:13
And yes.This explains a lot.

I'm sure you're aware that large segments of the population, even within the US, do not share east coast values in regard to stodginess?


https://s3.amazonaws.com/theoatmeal-img/comics/minor_differences5/suit1.png

https://s3.amazonaws.com/theoatmeal-img/comics/minor_differences5/suit2.png


Edit: To be fair, a lot of Japanese men do.




To be fair, men's fashion is rather simplistic. Sometimes I consider getting a sex change just to have more wardrobe options.Men's fashion is only simplistic if you have no style.


Not really. American (and English) white men are the worst and most unimaginative dressers on the planet. Probably because they limit themselves by saying things like "pink's a chick color" because we're so homophobic.
word

Jiggit
January 21st, 2015, 09:22
Something I find interesting is comparing men's fashion mags in the UK vs in Japan. In Japan they're catered to like a dozen different "styles", they give you tons of ideas of how to wear different items, break down the history of certain garments, have a lot of inspiration pics and generally tell you what you can do. Men's fashion in the west seems to be all about what you can't do, it's about rules and correcting your "mistakes". A lot of dudes in Japan are experimenting with what they wear and, to be fair, sometimes dressing really weirdly. But I'd rather see that than dudes just wearing the same thing as everyone else all day because they're so afraid of being wrong or being perceived as effeminate or whatever.

Only person who's ever asked me if I was gay was an American girl who came back to my apartment and saw that I had more than 3 pairs of footwear, so I assume it's the same over there.

webstaa
January 21st, 2015, 09:42
Something I find interesting is comparing men's fashion mags in the UK vs in Japan. In Japan they're catered to like a dozen different "styles", they give you tons of ideas of how to wear different items, break down the history of certain garments, have a lot of inspiration pics and generally tell you what you can do. Men's fashion in the west seems to be all about what you can't do, it's about rules and correcting your "mistakes". A lot of dudes in Japan are experimenting with what they wear and, to be fair, sometimes dressing really weirdly. But I'd rather see that than dudes just wearing the same thing as everyone else all day because they're so afraid of being wrong or being perceived as effeminate or whatever.

Only person who's ever asked me if I was gay was an American girl who came back to my apartment and saw that I had more than 3 pairs of footwear, so I assume it's the same over there.

Had a girlfriend be very surprised when I let on that I had more than one pair of "dress shoes." Not my fault that people think they can wear whatever shoes they want with whatever else and it'll be OK because they're "dress shoes." Too bad with indoor/outdoor shoes I end up wearing tennis shoes/sneakers with a suit 80% of the time. (Not that I'm a shining example of male fashion.)

uthinkimlost?
January 21st, 2015, 09:45
Only person who's ever asked me if I was gay was an American girl who came back to my apartment

http://i1.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/newsfeed/000/228/269/demotivational-posters-theres-your-problem.jpg

Jiggit
January 21st, 2015, 09:47
I still dress pretty conservatively tbh. Funny thing is when I go home I usually get a lot of compliments (I used to dress like sh1t) whereas I don't really get anything from Japanese people. I guess in England I'm dressed well, in Japan I'm just dressed like a normal dude.

I really do cringe when I see foreigners wandering around in their cargo shorts and tennis shoes. It's like, dude, you get +300 style points here for being a big nose honkey, why are you subtracting 200 by dressing like that?

starfish
January 21st, 2015, 10:22
This explains a lot.

I'm sure you're aware that large segments of the population, even within the US, do not share east coast values in regard to stodginess?



Well aware, and


To be fair, a lot of Japanese men do.

even moreso. Hence my advice. If this were about applying to work at Amazon, a flannel shirt and torn jeans would suffice.


Not really. American (and English) white men are the worst and most unimaginative dressers on the planet. Probably because they limit themselves by saying things like "pink's a chick color" because we're so homophobic.

It's not a matter of homophobia; pink accents on white people look like some kind of tribal foreskin atrocity. I stand by the assertion that it's a terrible color best used in very specific cases.

And we are still talking about professional attire, right? Push the limits all you want; you can't roll into an interview looking like a Jean-Paul Gaultier model and expect to be taken seriously. Convention exists for a reason.

word
January 21st, 2015, 10:30
even moreso.I disagree. Oh, don't get me wrong; Japanese men's fashions tend to be on the conservative side in comparison to much of the US, but it's a lot more of what Jiggit is saying--many Japanese men are stylish, not stodgy. Very old Japanese men? Stodgy, to be sure. Japanese men with rotting teeth, a odor of cheap tobacco and Nikka, and about 20 extra kilograms? Stodgy as hell. Well-to-do, under-40, professional, respectable Japanese men? They've got style and flair that would put most American men to shame (and do).

Your interview panel is probably not going to be old, stodgy Japanese guys. I don't think anyone should be afraid to be stylish. I certainly don't think it will hurt.


It's not a matter of homophobia...I wouldn't go that far but you do seem to have some weird issues.


...pink accents on white people look like some kind of tribal foreskin atrocity.Like, that's weird. Pink isn't always that flattering on us whiteys, but wtf.


And we are still talking about professional attire, right? Push the limits all you want; you can't roll into an interview looking like a Jean-Paul Gaultier model and expect to be taken seriously. Convention exists for a reason.Very east coast.

naginataonthebrain
January 21st, 2015, 12:08
Every time I hear anyone complain about how fashion isn't that complicated and that it doesn't apply to them, I just think of that scene from The Devil Wears Prada (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlQ3Lq41TDk) (sorry for the crappy quality, btw). Also, trying to resist the feminist-rage bait that is starfish's comment regarding pink is specifically for women and the flamboyant...:|

uthinkimlost?
January 21st, 2015, 12:10
Also, trying to resist the feminist-rage bait that is starfish's comment regarding pink is specifically for women and the flamboyant...:|

Therealwindycity is too busy working on his fingering to do it, so please feel free to stand in.

PuddingHead
January 21st, 2015, 12:23
Wasn't pink considered masculine at some point in time?

Zolrak 22
January 21st, 2015, 13:21
Wasn't pink considered masculine at some point in time?
And blue was "girly" [emoji14].

Then we flipped them around.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 21st, 2015, 14:05
I feel this thread is heading in a weird direction but, to be honest, I don't really mind. Mostly because Stunfisk just named my grindcore band for me...


tribal foreskin atrocity

I will, however, direct you to a Lounge thread where you can spew as much feminist rage as you like about this current topic, at http://www.ithinkimlost.com/threads/20101-The-Stylish-Starfish?p=896979#post896979.

coop52
January 21st, 2015, 14:48
And blue was "girly" [emoji14].

Then we flipped them around.

Yep! Because pink is derived from red, which is a passionate color. Blue is calming and more feminine.

Also, little boys (and girls too) used to wear little dresses until they were like 7 or so. And both men and women wore makeup throughout most of history. So, a lot of girly things weren't necessarily always girly.

megarooony
January 21st, 2015, 18:14
Speaking of things that didn't used to be girly, I'd just like to remind anyone considering wearing a dress/skirt suit to please wear pantyhose! I'm from California, so I know there are a lot of people who associate pantyhose exclusively with old ladies, but it is much better to err on the side of caution. Either in this thread, or Word's interview advice thread, someone mentioned that you are interviewing for a job as a civil servant for the government of a foreign country. Conservative is the way to go! And buy an extra pair that you leave unopened in your purse. Nylons will catch on the tiniest thing - don't let it happen to you!
Also, once you get here, if you plan on wearing skirts to work at all, you'll have to wear them anyway. There are definitely ALTs who don't bother, but it is common to get comments on it, both from students and teachers.

Jiggit
January 21st, 2015, 18:35
Pantyhose is definitely the silliest Americanism.

word
January 21st, 2015, 18:49
Is it an American thing? Is that the only reason it's popular here? I agree it is one of the dumbest things we have ever managed to sell people.

Ini
January 21st, 2015, 18:56
The name is painful. Most normal people call them tights.

word
January 21st, 2015, 19:01
The name is painful. Most normal people call them tights.
word

uthinkimlost?
January 21st, 2015, 19:21
I think in murrica pantyhose are supposed to be sheer while tights are opaque?

sharpinthefang
January 21st, 2015, 19:47
I think in murrica pantyhose are supposed to be sheer while tights are opaque?
Nope, both called tights with different levels of denier (thickness/opaqueness).

word
January 21st, 2015, 20:04
I think in murrica pantyhose are supposed to be sheer while tights are opaque?

Yeah; if not the official definition, that's certainly the manner in which the term is commonly used.

Also, the term makes me think of this cartoon (http://oglaf.com/owlbear/) (NSFW; big thank you to whoever it was who introduced me to the comic).

uthinkimlost?
January 21st, 2015, 20:51
Nope, both called tights with different levels of denier (thickness/opaqueness).

Yankeegirl.

uthinkimlost?
January 21st, 2015, 20:52
Yeah; if not the official definition, that's certainly the manner in which the term is commonly used.

Also, the term makes me think of this cartoon (http://oglaf.com/owlbear/) (NSFW; big thank you to whoever it was who introduced me to the comic).

You can pay me in your Bitcoin billions.

word
January 21st, 2015, 21:00
No way; the current exchange rate is way too low.

PuddingHead
January 21st, 2015, 23:44
I've heard pantyhose, stockings, leggings, and tights all used to describe the same thing.

And now there's jeggings, but let's not get into that.

naginataonthebrain
January 22nd, 2015, 02:21
I used to figure skate competitively when I was a kid so the idea of wearing pantyhose/tights/stockings is nothing new to me. :roll:

greyjoy
January 22nd, 2015, 16:08
I'd recommend Hermès, or if that's out of your price range, maybe something cheap, like Versace.

johnny
January 22nd, 2015, 18:33
Men shouldn't wear pink. I wore a suit made of gold sequins to my job interview with a white top hat.

word
January 22nd, 2015, 18:59
White? After Labor Day? Unacceptable!

johnny
January 22nd, 2015, 19:42
White? After Labor Day? Unacceptable!

Ha ha, I'm daring that way.

Jiggit
January 22nd, 2015, 19:54
I wore a pink shirt today just to scare johnny.

johnny
January 22nd, 2015, 19:55
I fear all clothing.