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Ark42
January 14th, 2015, 22:32
As somebody who did not receive an interview with JET this year, I'll be looking for others places to apply now. I know there are lots of listing on Gaijinpot and new ones all the time, but are there any other good job websites to check out?

I've seen daijob.com but I rarely hear anybody else talk about that place. What are your opinions about that website?

Zolrak 22
January 14th, 2015, 22:33
There's always Interac. From what I've been told, it's not a bad second choice.

Ini
January 14th, 2015, 22:42
You're not going to find an entry level english "teaching" job there. It's pretty good if you are a bilingual professional. I had some legal work off there before they realized I can't speak japanese and I gave up on life, living out my days at the bottom of a bottle.

Ark42
January 14th, 2015, 22:44
I contacted Interac a few months ago and after a quick phone interview, they closed my application and told me they don't want anybody who is married. Probably just the guy I happened to speak with on the phone, because I'm sure married people are with Interac, but that's basically the only point the guy repeated over and over to me. I did think it was strange, as I specifically said I'd figure out the visa for her myself and she can come over with me or later on, whichever is easier for people.

Ini
January 14th, 2015, 22:45
If jet and interac both turn you down at the first hurdle perhaps Japan isn't for you?

Penguee
January 14th, 2015, 23:37
I agree with Ini about daijob. You won't be able to find a job there unless you have business level Japanese.
I would say that coming over with a family is hard. Not impossible, but super hard. How is your Japanese? Is it good enough to be able to interpret at City Hall and Immigration for the information that you need for her and to do it all on your own? Interac probably didn't want to have to send extra people out there to help with that sort of thing.

You may have luck if you find a small Eikaiwa school that is wiling to hire you both at once.

Ark42
January 14th, 2015, 23:49
Well we have no kids, so it's just the two of us. That makes things a lot simpler than some other families I see going over. My Japanese is not business level. I could probably pass the N5 for sure, but I just haven't had the opportunity to take it yet. I know N5 doesn't really mean much at all though. I think my ability to read and recognize Kanji is a lot better than my ability to speak and listen, which is one of the reasons I really want to get over there and be immersed in the language more. My wife is also studying Japanese and knows some basics. I'm sure I could manage to do the dependent-visa paperwork for my wife. I don't really know how much is done in English at my local consulate and what needs to be done in Japan. I figured I'd cross that bridge when I get to it, and I don't expect Interact or any other employer to assist me in any way with that.

I've seen some jobs on Daijob that claim no Japanese, or minimum Japanese. Not teaching jobs, but jobs that I'd certainly qualify for. I haven't applied to anything on that site yet because I haven't heard anybody else talk about it until now, and I'm not sure I really want those jobs. I know it sounds strange, but I feel like it worsens my chances of learning Japanese and getting what I want out of being in Japan, so the more professional jobs are like a last-resort to me if I can't find a teaching job.

PuddingHead
January 15th, 2015, 00:57
I know someone at AEON, and she actually loves it. I don't know how, as her hours are terrible and the daily work she does sounds a little depressing, but there are certainly other options out there. Your options might be at an eikawa. Gaijinpot may be a better site for you if Daijob isn't working out.

Zolrak 22
January 15th, 2015, 00:58
and she actually loves it.

So what you are saying is that they broke her will?

ambrosse
January 15th, 2015, 01:13
A good friend of mine (ex-JET) decided to go back to Japan and did so through AEON.
The hours really do kind of suck especially if you want to have a good social life, but the pay is okay I guess.
A 7 year old student stood up in the middle of one of her classes and said, in the most joyous tone ever, that she peed her pants. They evacuated the room to clean it up, but pee girl sat in another chair in a different room, so they had to clean that one as well.

PuddingHead
January 15th, 2015, 02:07
So what you are saying is that they broke her will?

I'm not sure if she even had one to begin with. Poor thing didn't even apply to JET because she "knew​" she wouldn't get in.


A 7 year old student stood up in the middle of one of her classes and said, in the most joyous tone ever, that she peed her pants.

At least she was joyous about it?

Zolrak 22
January 15th, 2015, 02:10
she "knew​" she wouldn't get in.

Oh come on!

If I was to quit whenever I think that way, I wouldn't be where I am.

I don't think I'd even be in college/University [emoji14].

PuddingHead
January 15th, 2015, 03:18
Oh come on!

If I was to quit whenever I think that way, I wouldn't be where I am.

I don't think I'd even be in college/University.

Right? I don't quite understand it but, hey, it worked for her. I think he main concern was just getting to Japan, not what she did while she was there.

Penguee
January 15th, 2015, 08:29
A chain school might be good. Aeon is really strict with their weird rules though.
Like for example, you aren't allowed to
socialize, in English, with Japanese people who aren't your students or you could get fired.
Like...what?
But most Eikaiwa have weird rules like that. Even if you get placed in a horrible place you could always go a year and then try to move. Not the easiest, of course, especially with very low Japanese skills, but possible. Usually the new school would help out so there's that.

Jiggit
January 15th, 2015, 08:32
Like for example, you aren't allowed tosocialize, in English, with Japanese people who aren't your students or you could get fired. Like...what?

What like, ever?

Penguee
January 15th, 2015, 08:36
I know someone at AEON, and she actually loves it. I don't know how, as her hours are terrible and the daily work she does sounds a little depressing, but there are certainly other options out there. Your options might be at an eikawa. Gaijinpot may be a better site for you if Daijob isn't working out.
A lot of people (especially JET) look down on Eikaiwa work majorly. But I get to sleep until noon everyday if I want. (I don't, but whatever) and I have at most 7 kids in a class. I actually get to teach them personally instead of jumping up and down and trying to keep their attention. For an ALT especially in elementary, there aren't a lot
of opportunities to bond with your students and get to know them. I have over 350 and I know all of them, their weak points and such.
So many look down on Eikaiwa, but it really depends on school and management. It can be a living hell, or an amazing place where you get to follow the student as they excel in English.

Penguee
January 15th, 2015, 08:48
What like, ever?
Yeah. It's the dumbest and most impossible to enforce rule ever. But I guess it gives them reason to fire you at any moment...

Jiggit
January 15th, 2015, 08:49
A chain school might be good. Aeon is really strict with their weird rules though.
But most Eikaiwa have weird rules like that.


A lot of people (especially JET) look down on Eikaiwa work majorly.


But I guess it gives them reason to fire you at any moment...

I think there might be a link here.

Ark42
January 15th, 2015, 08:56
I dunno guys, you're kind of selling me on Eikaiwa now.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 15th, 2015, 09:09
I dunno guys, you're kind of selling me on Eikaiwa now.

You're... attracted to a lack of job security?

Jiggit
January 15th, 2015, 09:10
He's attracted to whatever scant options are left to him.

Ark42
January 15th, 2015, 09:17
I'm not really sure any Eikaiwa or ALT position offers that much long-term security. I'm more interested in getting to Japan, meeting people over there, learning Japanese, and maybe going on some hikes once in a while. If I get fired because I spoke English to somebody on the street, then at least I'm already in Japan and can probably find a new job a lot easier than from overseas. The money and hours with Eikaiwas aren't an issue at all. The only reason I'd prefer ALT is because of the specific stories of people having to be annoying salesmen at Eikaiwas, getting people to buy extra books or lessons, etc. That particular aspect doesn't seem like fun, but the rest of the things mentioned here, sure, no problem.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 15th, 2015, 09:34
Eh, fair enough. I would advise you to consider why you were rejected from two major programmes though, definitely before you start searching for other positions. A lot of the same kinds of jobs have very similar hiring requirements.

uthinkimlost?
January 15th, 2015, 09:36
Now, snow. It is only a matter of time before Japan realizes its massive error and embraces the lad.

Ini
January 15th, 2015, 09:38
Heart will have anyone. One guy made it to Tokyo orientation last year before they discovered he was functionally illiterate and couldnt read the 3rd grade JHS textbook........

word
January 15th, 2015, 09:44
Heart will have anyone. One guy made it to Tokyo orientation last year before they discovered he was functionally illiterate and couldnt read the 3rd grade JHS textbook........
Please tell me this is a true story.

Ark42
January 15th, 2015, 09:47
Eh, fair enough. I would advise you to consider why you were rejected from two major programmes though, definitely before you start searching for other positions. A lot of the same kinds of jobs have very similar hiring requirements.

If only they would tell me, I could try to work on something to improve myself.

Honestly though, I'm pretty certain the only reason I didn't even get an interview with Interac is because I'm married. And as far as JET goes, the only thing I can guess at is that my letters of reference weren't unique enough. That's the only thing in the application I didn't get to see, and can't go back and review now. I suppose it could be the lack of teaching experience and Japanese skills, but I'm fairly certain many people get jobs at both of those places with those faults.

Ini
January 15th, 2015, 09:49
I like cheese

sharpinthefang
January 15th, 2015, 12:18
If only they would tell me, I could try to work on something to improve myself.

Honestly though, I'm pretty certain the only reason I didn't even get an interview with Interac is because I'm married. And as far as JET goes, the only thing I can guess at is that my letters of reference weren't unique enough. That's the only thing in the application I didn't get to see, and can't go back and review now. I suppose it could be the lack of teaching experience and Japanese skills, but I'm fairly certain many people get jobs at both of those places with those faults.

This might not be quite what you want to hear, but one of the first things I remember you posting was that you would come to Japan regardless of any outcome. Some of your posts have been a little... offish considering how new you are to the site. (Not that we have much to speak about, but we played nice when we were new then turn into what we are now).

How desperate did you appear in the letter? If you don't mind, why not post it up here and maybe we can help. Especially if you are going to use the basis of that for your other Japan job applications.

uthinkimlost?
January 15th, 2015, 12:30
And as far as JET goes, the only thing I can guess at is that my letters of reference weren't unique enough. That's the only thing in the application I didn't get to see, and can't go back and review now.

Who did you ask? Uniqueness doesn't matter in those so much, so long as they clearly hold you in esteem. I've seen letters for people (for other jobs) where the writer was clearly trying to communicate that the subject was a fuckup, just in a roundabout way.

Penguee
January 15th, 2015, 12:51
I think there might be a link here.

Well yeah. Lots of chain schools are awful factories from what I heard. But there are diamonds in the rough and you usually find that in original (not chain) English Schools. If Ark wants to get to Japan no matter what, a chain school offers the ability to get him here and (probably) let him stay at least a year.

Zolrak 22
January 15th, 2015, 13:51
Please tell me this is a true story.
+1

By the way Ark,

If you are THAT dead set on Japan, it doesn't hurt to get a TEFL certification. Even if it's an online one. (Like the one I got)

itsabird
January 15th, 2015, 14:32
but we played nice when we were new then turn into what we are now

Some of us made the change faster than others.

Edit : Think of it as if it were puberty.

itsabird
January 15th, 2015, 14:36
Silly

Ark42
January 15th, 2015, 22:45
How desperate did you appear in the letter? If you don't mind, why not post it up here and maybe we can help. Especially if you are going to use the basis of that for your other Japan job applications.

I made an outline answering all the bullet points I knew they wanted answered, and then just wrote an honest 2 pages about myself, the things I like about Japan, and what I want to get out of being there. I don't think I sounded desperate in any way. It's not that I wouldn't like the advice, but I don't really feel like posting such a personal essay on the Internet for strangers to read.


Who did you ask? Uniqueness doesn't matter in those so much, so long as they clearly hold you in esteem. I've seen letters for people (for other jobs) where the writer was clearly trying to communicate that the subject was a fuckup, just in a roundabout way.

I asked two of my best clients who I am very certain would have nothing but good things to say. I've been a freelance software developer for the 12 years since I graduated college, and most of my clients come and go, or are out of state and I never meet face-to-face. The two that I did ask are both local, and both people that I've done lots of repeat work for.


If you are THAT dead set on Japan, it doesn't hurt to get a TEFL certification. Even if it's an online one. (Like the one I got)

I've been seriously considering doing that, even if I'm already in Japan teaching while I'm getting it.

sharpinthefang
January 15th, 2015, 23:08
Have you ever proof read your own work? How about getting someone else to proof read it? You will never find flaws, typos or incorrect opinions in your own work, but you will in others.
I used to hate proof reading my work, but when friends from different courses helped each other out, it really made a difference.

I know you behave differently on here to RL, but think about how you come across on here. Think about the other points I mentioned and address them.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 15th, 2015, 23:46
...and what I want to get out of being there...

How much did you focus on this? You seem pretty driven to get to Japan for reasons far removed from actual teaching (judging only by what you've said here, of course), and that could potentially come across very negatively in an interview/evaluation situation.

Zolrak 22
January 15th, 2015, 23:54
Hey n00bs. I'm BJ

There was a bit of a mocking tone in that thread, but the information is based on this very issue.

Ark42
January 16th, 2015, 00:05
Have you ever proof read your own work? How about getting someone else to proof read it? You will never find flaws, typos or incorrect opinions in your own work, but you will in others.
I used to hate proof reading my work, but when friends from different courses helped each other out, it really made a difference.

I know you behave differently on here to RL, but think about how you come across on here. Think about the other points I mentioned and address them.

I know exactly what you mean. Yes, there were certainly a few grammatical errors and odd things that I read over 20 times and never caught. That's why I had other people proof it, definitely.



How much did you focus on this? You seem pretty driven to get to Japan for reasons far removed from actual teaching (judging only by what you've said here, of course), and that could potentially come across very negatively in an interview/evaluation situation.

I'd say it was 50/50. In other sections, I did focus on why I want to be an ALT, and how I want to interact with students/teachers outside of the classroom. I tried to make it clear that I was not going to be a shut-in or loaner who just shows up to work and leaves as soon as I'm allowed. I also focused on the volunteering I'd done over the past several years where I was a mentor for kids of all ages in a mixed setting.

sharpinthefang
January 16th, 2015, 00:18
I know exactly what you mean. Yes, there were certainly a few grammatical errors and odd things that I read over 20 times and never caught. That's why I had other people proof it, definitely.
I was not trying to point that out, although that would also count. I was trying to point out hidden messages / meanings that may or may not have come across. Tone and the such like.

Ark42
January 16th, 2015, 00:22
Yeah, I was not explicit about that in my last post, but it fell under "and odd things". I certainly reworked entire paragraphs and scrapped whole giant bits of the SoP on the advice of the people reviewing it.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 16th, 2015, 00:27
Okay, you could approach it a little differently - maybe write down / think of the reasons that somebody might think you were a bad fit for japan, and then see how many of those might have been signaled/accidentally touched on in your applications.

Penguee
January 16th, 2015, 00:33
Also, if you're intent on going to Japan then now is the best time. Most jobs begin in April at the beginning of the school year, so you should probably start applying.
And I know it sounds silly, but you need to read the entire vacancy and fulfill all the conditions. My co-worker was hired only because she was the only person to follow the posting's requests to an "T".

Ark42
January 16th, 2015, 00:40
Sure, any combination of these things could potentially be a flag, depending on who was looking at my application packet:

* Married
* In my mid-30s
* No actual teaching experience
* No certifications related to teaching or Japanese
* No in-classroom learning of Japanese language (only self-study)
* Self employed
* Wanting to switch careers to a much lower paying one

I'm sure there could be more. I don't try to dwell on any of those in my SOP. I did try to show what I could in a positive light.

mrcharisma
January 16th, 2015, 02:52
I was not trying to point that out, although that would also count. I was trying to point out hidden messages / meanings that may or may not have come across. Tone and the such like.


Sure, any combination of these things could potentially be a flag, depending on who was looking at my application packet:

* Married
* In my mid-30s
* No actual teaching experience
* No certifications related to teaching or Japanese
* No in-classroom learning of Japanese language (only self-study)
* Self employed
* Wanting to switch careers to a much lower paying one

I'm sure there could be more. I don't try to dwell on any of those in my SOP. I did try to show what I could in a positive light.

Considering most if ITIL had you down as a train wreck within a couple of posts maybe that came out in the essay / interview too?

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 16th, 2015, 07:41
Be nice, Stalin - we're trying to be helpful and see past that.

uthinkimlost?
January 16th, 2015, 07:57
There are listings for software developers all the time. Have you applied to any of those?

Zolrak 22
January 16th, 2015, 08:04
There are listings for software developers all the time. Have you applied to any of those?
I believe he said something about wanting to practice Japanese and how he thought that kind of job wouldn't allow him to do so.

Jiggit
January 16th, 2015, 08:38
Sure, any combination of these things could potentially be a flag, depending on who was looking at my application packet

* Married - Yes; although it would seem most applicants with dependents at least get to interview to explain how they'll work it.
* In my mid-30s - Perhaps; unlikely, since I know plenty of JETs who were accepted at that age.
* No actual teaching experience - Nope.
* No certifications related to teaching or Japanese - Nope.
* No in-classroom learning of Japanese language (only self-study) - Nope.
* Self employed - Only if it led you to having poor references (which kinda seems like it)
* Wanting to switch careers to a much lower paying one - Doubt it

And Interac probably cares about those things even less. So either you have poor references or there's something else wrong with your application. You said yourself that you're certain you didn't make any mistakes with the forms, so it must be in your SoP. Don't be so certain that there's nothing wrong with it if you've been rejected twice before the interview stage. Get past the blaming of external factors you can't affect and focus on what you can change.

Don't fall for the lame excuses rejectees make like how they never had a chance because they don't speak Japanese or have a TEFL course. The majority of JETs don't. That's just a way of making yourself feel better by avoiding the problem.

uthinkimlost?
January 16th, 2015, 08:57
http://ilovejapan.tumblr.com/

That is actually the site that brought me here for the first time; I found it while looking something or other up during my application. It really reflects the inability of a lot of applicants (and successful JETs) to admit that they did something wrong.

Jiggit is right, and the odds are that either the letters or your SoP statements were off-mark. (Unless, of course, you disclosed some kind of contagious illness or said you received regular treatment for pressure sores.)

The SoP is 95% what YOU will bring to the table. The remaining 5% should be what you will get from the deal.

Tyr
January 20th, 2015, 04:03
Do not work for an eikaiwa. It is a living hell to which the only exits are death or quitting.

If you actually get yourself to Japan it makes job applications infinitely easier. Anyone with a pulse and rudimentary English skills can get a job (not a good job, but a job) in Japan.

Ark42
January 20th, 2015, 04:18
If you actually get yourself to Japan it makes job applications infinitely easier. Anyone with a pulse and rudimentary English skills can get a job (not a good job, but a job) in Japan.

I've heard that quite a lot, but I've also heard that it's pretty difficult to get a job while you're there on a tourist visa. If only the USA had those working-holiday visas available as well...

itsabird
January 20th, 2015, 09:37
Let's face it Ark. You're getting old. No one wants someone who's 12 years older than the rest of us. You're just a regular teacher at that point, not a gaijin who is hip and with the trends (according to what Japan thinks anyways. Because 99% of the English teachers I meet are NOT hip, and are NOT trendy).

webstaa
January 20th, 2015, 12:19
Let's face it Ark. You're getting old. No one wants someone who's 12 years older than the rest of us. You're just a regular teacher at that point, not a gaijin who is hip and with the trends (according to what Japan thinks anyways. Because 99% of the English teachers I meet are NOT hip, and are NOT trendy).

98% of JETs start the program under 25 (or at least it seems that way.) But there are a few silver hairs who get through. Heck, there was a psych PHD who is was an ALT (he presented at TO 2013.) And there are at least 2 JET ALTs who are old enough to have silver hair - and from talking to them, they seem to get along with their co-workers much better than a lot of the younger ALTs.

Zolrak 22
January 20th, 2015, 12:37
I have a friend who's had silver hair since he was 10, does that count? [emoji14]

sharpinthefang
January 20th, 2015, 13:12
98% of JETs start the program under 25 (or at least it seems that way.) But there are a few silver hairs who get through. Heck, there was a psych PHD who is was an ALT (he presented at TO 2013.) And there are at least 2 JET ALTs who are old enough to have silver hair - and from talking to them, they seem to get along with their co-workers much better than a lot of the younger ALTs.
Johnny is also one of the older ones and he made it through (although he is only staying the one year)

uthinkimlost?
January 20th, 2015, 13:16
not a gaijin who is hip and with the trends (according to what Japan thinks anyways. Because 99% of the English teachers I meet are NOT hip, and are NOT trendy).

I have yet to meet any ALT that is nearly as hip and trendy as they believe. Once you're out of uni, it really is all over.

mrcharisma
January 20th, 2015, 13:17
98% of JETs start the program under 25 (or at least it seems that way.) But there are a few silver hairs who get through. Heck, there was a psych PHD who is was an ALT (he presented at TO 2013.) And there are at least 2 JET ALTs who are old enough to have silver hair - and from talking to them, they seem to get along with their co-workers much better than a lot of the younger ALTs.

In 2011 it didn't seem more than 60%. Weak yen and cutting of perks put off the silver foxes since then.

moonbeam
January 22nd, 2015, 09:12
From what I can tell, most eikaiwas make you to live in the housing they provide for you, and most of those are single occupancy only. So if you're married, then they probably won't hire you.

Risingfromashes
January 22nd, 2015, 12:03
If only they would tell me, I could try to work on something to improve myself.

Honestly though, I'm pretty certain the only reason I didn't even get an interview with Interac is because I'm married. And as far as JET goes, the only thing I can guess at is that my letters of reference weren't unique enough. That's the only thing in the application I didn't get to see, and can't go back and review now. I suppose it could be the lack of teaching experience and Japanese skills, but I'm fairly certain many people get jobs at both of those places with those faults.

When I began contacting Interac they were discouraging too, because I'm married. I was persistent. Finally, I spoke with Richelle Trickle the General manager and she told me that they have married teachers. She said to mention it in your app only at the end when they ask if anyone will accompany you, but not to focus on it at all during the interview process. Just write that they will follow along later. She said that it's a pain for the company, so sometimes they try to avoid the applicants just to make things easier, but it is possible. After I spoke with her, I made sure that whenever possible I contacted her for information. I was hired for the Spring and I'm aware of 2 other married applicants who were hired as well. How far in the process did you get? Phone interview or just inquiring about info? It's really in the beginning when they try to stop you. When you make it through that part, it doesn't really seem to be a factor.

Ark42
January 22nd, 2015, 22:19
When I began contacting Interac they were discouraging too, because I'm married. I was persistent. Finally, I spoke with Richelle Trickle the General manager and she told me that they have married teachers. She said to mention it in your app only at the end when they ask if anyone will accompany you, but not to focus on it at all during the interview process. Just write that they will follow along later. She said that it's a pain for the company, so sometimes they try to avoid the applicants just to make things easier, but it is possible. After I spoke with her, I made sure that whenever possible I contacted her for information. I was hired for the Spring and I'm aware of 2 other married applicants who were hired as well. How far in the process did you get? Phone interview or just inquiring about info? It's really in the beginning when they try to stop you. When you make it through that part, it doesn't really seem to be a factor.

I had started by directly applying on their website. I filled out everything on their very nice and easy to use form. The only place I mentioned I was married was the very bottom where it has the box to list people accompanying you. I just put my "My wife, [name]" in that box. I got a call from some a guy a few days later that lasted maybe 5 minutes or so. I specifically tried to mention that I'll do any paperwork on my own with regard to a dependent visa, but he just kept going back to talking about me being married several times. I also said that she can come over with me or several weeks/months later on, whatever is easier for people. He never explicitly said it was a problem to be married, I was just worried because he dwelled on that topic more than anything else. Every other question was just a customary "you have 12 years of schooling in English?" and "you have a 4-year college degree". A few days later, my application status was changed to withdrawn/closed and I got a short generic email from them.

johnny
January 23rd, 2015, 21:04
Johnny is also one of the older ones and he made it through (although he is only staying the one year)

Yuppers. I'm an aged 32 now, but I was only 30 when I arrived in Japan. I'm also half-way through my second and final year.

Honestly, one thing that helped me is that in interviews I think I come off as pretty affable.

Another thing I told them was that I wouldn't be heartbroken if I didn't make it into JET. I told them I loved my job, and that if I didn't make it in I would keep trying to advance at my current job.

They seemed surprised by my answer, but it obviously didn't hurt me too much.

toumasu
January 30th, 2015, 14:53
Another option would be getting into headhunting/recruiting. I have a bunch of friends that do that/have done that in Tokyo and it seems like a decent deal if you land with a good company.

Ini
January 30th, 2015, 14:56
Headhunting is lower than Eikaiwa. It is the last resort of the shyster, under qualified and the desperate.

toumasu
January 30th, 2015, 15:42
Headhunting is lower than Eikaiwa. It is the last resort of the shyster, under qualified and the desperate.
i'm sorry you had a such a bad experience as a headhunter

Ini
January 30th, 2015, 15:48
how ghastly, no i prefer guaranteed paycheques and not having the fear of being fired hanging over my head if I dont manage to convince 1 of the 500 people I call that week to jump ship.

Jiggit
January 30th, 2015, 15:50
Mr. Simmons, Sir, headhunting as the common folk know it is merely a term used to mean working for an executive search firm.

I'm sure everyone would enjoy the sport of hunting young men in the prime of their fitness as much as yourself; that is, if they had your keen senses, razor-sharp wits and private death lair on a volcanic island in an undisposed tropical location.

toumasu
January 30th, 2015, 15:54
how ghastly, no i prefer guaranteed paycheques and not having the fear of being fired hanging over my head if I dont manage to convince 1 of the 500 people I call that week to jump ship.
hmm everyone i know gets a guaranteed cheque and signing bonuses on top. of course you'll probably get canned if you don't perform but that is almost the case anywhere (except JET)

Mr. Simmons, Sir, headhunting as the common folk know it is merely a term used to mean working for an executive search firm.


I'm sure everyone would enjoy the sport of hunting young men in the prime of their fitness as much as yourself; that is, if they had your keen senses, razor-sharp wits and private death lair on a volcanic island in an undisposed tropical location.
never looked at it like that

Ini
January 30th, 2015, 16:18
the old gaijinpot forums were full of threads on recruitment horror stories.

toumasu
January 30th, 2015, 16:24
the old gaijinpot forums were full of threads on recruitment horror stories.
yeah i suppose everyone tries to show their best front when talking about their lives in person, so what i've heard could definitely be skewed. i'll try to look up those threads to get a more balanced firsthand account through the veil of anonymity. thanks for the suggestion, ini

Ini
January 30th, 2015, 16:27
the general rule seems to be if you a pretty cut throat person who can handle the hard sell and dont mind stabbing your colleagues in the back you can do ok. "Senior" recruiters do ok but lots of people tend to flake out after 3months-1 year.

mothy
January 30th, 2015, 18:00
Also I've never met a successful headhunter who was a decent human being.

Gizmotech
January 31st, 2015, 11:22
My clearly jewish friend was asked to pretend to be the whitest american joe when he was working headhunting down in Tokyo.