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Liamers
January 16th, 2015, 09:06
On the app i said i had no preference to where i was placed if i get accepted. And i don't really. Just wondering if you guys know how non-preference people fare when the finally get placed. Are they usually put in the back arse of no where or is it random?

Jiggit
January 16th, 2015, 09:10
I put no preference and I'm in a very nice part of Japan in an academic high school (which I would consider a better than average placement). When applying I did worry about whether it would seem like I wasn't interested in Japan enough if I didn't have any idea where I wanted to go in Japan but I've done pretty well I think. The only bad part is that when people ask me "why did you want to come to our prefecture/city" I have to tell them that I didn't.

Liamers
January 16th, 2015, 09:15
I did worry about whether it would seem like I wasn't interested in Japan enough if I didn't have any idea where I wanted to go in Japan.

that's what I was thinking. No harm to have a couple of prefectures in my head on the day in case they ask for an example

soh
January 16th, 2015, 10:05
I put no preference as well and the interviewer asked me something like 'Are you OK with being placed in both rural and urban areas?'

I got placed in a rural town which isn't the worst compared to other ALTs in this prefecture. I don't think the placement is random either as my predecessors are from my province.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 16th, 2015, 14:18
Some placements want very specific kinds of people from very specific areas - it seems like that trumps applicant placement requests.

Zolrak 22
January 16th, 2015, 14:20
The only bad part is that when people ask me "why did you want to come to our prefecture/city" I have to tell them that I didn't.

"It was a wonderful surprise"? [emoji14]

Gizmotech
January 16th, 2015, 15:15
I chose three places, figure'd I had a good chance to get em, what with qualifications/experience, and ended up in the middle of butt fuck nowhere.

My friend put no preference and ended up in kobe.

Random shit happens randomly.

Jiggit
January 16th, 2015, 15:18
"It was a wonderful surprise"? [emoji14]

Just because Japanese people are nice and polite all the time doesn't make them idiots.



Still not sure about Americans though...

Gizmotech
January 16th, 2015, 15:19
"It was a wonderful surprise"? [emoji14]

I seriously joke with the locals, "I was like buttfucknowhere-shi? In whothefuckcares-ken? Where the hell is that?". Best part, the locals love the joke because they get the same reaction anytime they're out of the area and tell someone where they live :P

webstaa
January 16th, 2015, 15:37
Placement preference or not, you get thrown into the mix like everybody. 90% of placement requests can't possibly be done anyways (like the 65% or so that probably puts down Tokyo/Osaka/Kyoto, if not more.) But if you aim broad (like - Hokkaido or Tohoku or Kinki/Chubu etc.) you might not be disappointed. I know two ALTs who requested Hokkaido and are in Kyushu and one other who requested Shiga prefecture and is in Aomori.

Every placement is different, so even in between different schools in the same town or small city can be two VERY different experiences.

EDIT: Also, when I get asked "Why this part of this prefecture?" I just say "For work" and then laugh a bit and tell them I didn't know about the town until I started the job. It seems to work better.

JET ProgramCoordinator SF
January 17th, 2015, 03:16
Placements are anything but random. They basically work like this: JETs have preferences. Contracting Organizations (COs) have preferences. Tokyo tries to match those up to the best they can. If a Japanese-speaking with a driver's license JET says "I want some place in Shiga-ken with elementary school students" and the Shiga-ken elementary school BoE says "We want someone from the US who speaks Japanese and has a driver's license" then Tokyo might put those two together. I imagine that a CO's preference takes precedence over an individual JET's preference. For example, if you take that same JET but now remove their ability to speak Japanese, they won't be placed with that CO, since they no longer meet their requirements.

This is why those that pass the interview are called "shortlisters" - once you pass the interview, the matchmaking process begins. There have been times in the past where someone who passed their interview was unable to be matched with a CO, and they could not join JET. I personally have never seen this happen nor heard of it happen recently, and I would not worry about it at all if you are a shortlister, as it is extraordinarily rare.

If you put "No preference" for placement, then that just means that's one less thing that Tokyo will take into consideration from your side of the requests. It does not mean an automatic "Great, let's stick this person out in the boonies." Tokyo does take into account more than just your location preference - they also take into account notes that the interviewers send them. "Likes to go surfing," "Hobby is snowboarding," etc. I don't know how they weigh those though. I've known plenty of JETs who said that snowboarding was their life's passion and then were placed at the bottom of Kyushu. But I think they do a pretty good job overall - it's quite impressive for a handful of people in Tokyo to be able to place 2000+ JETs each year within a month and a half (or ~40 working days).

Additionally, I can say that your placement does not make or break your JET experience by that factor alone. There is a huge personality match factor that can't be surmised beforehand. I've known JETs who absolutely hate their placement, and then the next JET in that exact same placement absolutely loves it and stays there for 5 years. Even if you get the prefecture that you requested, you could be unhappy with your schools having strict teachers, or you don't get along with the other JETs in the area. Perhaps had you been placed on the opposite side of Japan, in a location that you would have never dreamed of going to, you would have gotten along better with the local JETs, had great teachers, and maybe met someone special. 5 of the JETs that were in my suburban city ended up getting married to a local. I don't think any of them had requested that location, but it worked out great for them. Other JETs in my area hated it and left after one year. You just never know.

That's why the unofficial JET motto is ESID - Every Situation Is Different (TM).

Liamers
January 17th, 2015, 07:24
Thanks for that SF :)

Gizmotech
January 17th, 2015, 09:01
Ya, I'm a five year jet after a string of one and two year jets (far more ones)

uthinkimlost?
January 17th, 2015, 09:30
Ya, I'm a five year jet after a string of one and two year jets (far more ones)

Same.

acpc2203
January 18th, 2015, 05:23
I choose the sister cities/prefectures of my city/state, I remember reading that they do take that into account but I figure some cities/prefectures care more about getting people from a sister area than others.

HILife
January 19th, 2015, 14:07
I put "no preference" on my form and I was placed in Tottori-ken. When I initially stated I preferred an urban area, I was shocked to be placed in the least populated prefecture. However, I found out I was in the most populated part of the prefecture: Tottori City. There are a lot of people here and I live with a bunch of foreigners in the same building. We have such a great relationship! I also really enjoy my school even though it's on the low academic end because I have the freedom to teach whatever I want. A friend of mine is in Kyoto-ken, but is in a very rural city. She is not staying for another year, but I am. I guess you can never really tell based on the placement based only on the prefectures. Thanks to whoever it was that placed me in the urban part of my prefecture :)

Tyr
January 20th, 2015, 04:13
There's two layers of placement don't forget.
The BOEs tell Tokyo vague descriptions of the sort of people they would like, Tokyo then decides who goes to which BOE. And then at the BOEs someone has to decide who goes where. I remember the PA at my ken once told me all about how he decided my group's placements,

And yep. Its anything but random.
I remember in my ken was one 'city' (rural county) where half the ALTs were from the same US state due to relations there, a guy with experience teaching in a really shitty area back home got sent to the really shitty high school here, guy into the outdoors got sent to the village of 2000 whose school only had 5 students, people with Japanese skills tended to be sent to the elementary schools whilst total Japan-noobs got the high schools, people from top unis and/or with teaching experience got sent to academically better schools, etc...

My placement was pretty lame. I often dream of how things might have been had only I realised more about Japan and been smarter with my placement options or had different luck....but nonetheless, despite these 'What ifs' and 'maybes' and 'it could have been better...' I still remember my Jet time fondly.

Cake
January 20th, 2015, 12:15
It seems like it is a random process but yeah it does seem like there's a system for who goes where. Like some people already said, some BOEs are looking for certain kinds of ALTs. I requested a city in one of the less well-known/popular prefectures thinking I'd have a good chance of getting it, but I ended up with some tiny remote town 2 hours away from my first choice because the BOE had asked for an ALT of my particular gender/country, and I guess the organisers thought that was close enough.
I would agree that JETs with Japanese skills are more likely to get sent to elementary schools because often the JTEs don't speak any English. E.g. the nearest JET to me (20 minutes further away from buttfuck nowhere) put no preference, has a Japanese degree and got EHS. However I also remember a lot of "no preference" people getting Tokyo placements that had only opened that year, but the downside to that was they had no predecessors, had to find an apartment when they got there and then get all furniture and everything by themselves. Some might say it's a good thing not to inherit all your pred's junk, but IMO moving to another country is stressful enough so I was pretty glad to have an apartment that was all ready for me to live in.

ticktockticktock
July 5th, 2016, 10:58
Hard to say what chance you have of your placement preferences being taken into consideration. I got more or less the exact opposite of what I put down for my placement requests. Clearly they didn't take my placement preferences into consideration one bit. Sucks but what's done is done. However, I wanted to raise a point about the driving question.

One item that does seem to make a difference is whether or not you check the "Do you have a valid drivers license are are you willing to drive" question. If you don't want to drive i.e. if you want less of a chance of being placed in an isolated location, don't check the box. This question apparently has more sway that any of the placement requests you make. I mistakenly checked the box thinking it would make my application look better, but being that I requested urban I never really expected to be placed in a rural, isolated location at least 4 hours away from any major metropolitan area that more or less requires a car. When I really thought it over, I realized that I had no desire whatsoever to drive in Japan and should've approached the question that way. In addition to being a headache, cars cost money meaning that you'll likely have to pay out of pocket for one soon after you arrive (unless you get lucky, but I've learned not to rely on luck with JET). It's an extra layer of stress I never wanted to deal with.

So don't make my mistake. Only check that box if you like driving and want to be rural. We'll never truly know what goes on behind the curtain in regards to placements and personally I find the lack of consideration given to ALT placement requests to be one of the major weaknesses of the JET Program based on what I've seen happen to myself and many others, but that's a discussion for another topic.

mothy
July 5th, 2016, 12:01
I didn't request urban and checked the box I'd be willing to drive, but ended up urban.
It's draw names out of a hat levels of planning with placements.

OatsCurrySummer
July 5th, 2016, 12:22
I requested Hokkaido and got Okinawa.
The system is this:
Request the exact opposite of what you want, and maybe, just maybe, you'll get your first choice.

Gizmotech
July 5th, 2016, 12:28
I requested Hokkaido and got Okinawa.
The system is this:
Request the exact opposite of what you want, and maybe, just maybe, you'll get your first choice.

There are days I actually believe this to be true.

ticktockticktock
July 5th, 2016, 12:36
I didn't request urban and checked the box I'd be willing to drive, but ended up urban.
It's draw names out of a hat levels of planning with placements.

Right, that is my point though. ALT placement requests are mostly a toss up but if you don't check the willing to drive box then you can at least exercise a modicum of control over something regarding your placement. Had I not checked that box I wouldn't have been given my current placement. Doesn't mean I would've gotten a better one but I probably wouldn't have gotten a placement where a car is necessary. You do hear the odd story of a non-driving ALT being placed somewhere where they probably should have a car, but based on what I've seen the driving question is one factor that does make a difference with placements. Take any advantage you can, no matter how insignificant it seems. I had thought the question insignificant when filling out my application but was proved wrong the hard way.

Ini
July 5th, 2016, 12:51
I almost got the exact placement I requested, the damn ALT was staying on for a 3rd year so I ended up having to settle for the town next to it. If you didn't even get the same prefecture you requested its probably a sign you just scraped into the program by the skin of your teeth.

mothy
July 5th, 2016, 12:59
Back in the dark ages, accepting requests was probably more common. Now, with more JETs, they probably don't figure it's worth the effort.

Frap
July 5th, 2016, 13:07
I got my first choice.

fryfry
July 5th, 2016, 13:13
For what it's worth, I got the general region that my requests were in.
I requested 3 cities in SW Japan, and I got a city in SW Japan, though none of my exact requests. I also mentioned in my interview that I was not very particular about where I ended up, so they probably took that into consideration.

acpc2203
July 5th, 2016, 13:28
I didn't get my preferences but my reasoning for choosing them was that they were sister cities and I ended up getting another sister city.

OatsCurrySummer
July 5th, 2016, 13:30
If you didn't even get the same prefecture you requested its probably a sign you just scraped into the program by the skin of your teeth.
C'est vrai.
Source: I still wonder how desperate the JET program must have been to select me.

JPNLKatie
July 5th, 2016, 14:51
I didn't get my exact preference, but I was pretty vague on what I requested anyway. Still, I think where I've been placed is perfect.

I chose Kyoto Prefecture, a random prefecture just under Kyoto (I think the prefecture that has Nara), and strangely enough, Fukuoka. However, I said I was flexible with my placement and in my notes, I just requested that I be placed somewhere semi-rural / suburban, and a place that had a lot of historical value. I also requested to be placed in an Elementary school. I should note that my Japanese is at the intermediate/advanced level. I checked the box for the question that asked "do you have a drivers licence". I don't believe there was a question asking specifically if I would be willing to drive or not.

I've been placed in Nagahama, where I'll be working at one Elementary school. It seems the main transportation there (for ALTs) is by bike, which is fine by me. I would be totally fine driving in Japan, but I don't really want to have to bother with buying a car, getting insurance, and worrying about maintenance and shaken. It would just be too costly and stressful to be worth it in my opinion. Still, I plan to get my IDP before leaving just in case.

I haven't gotten to Nagahama yet so I can't say what it is like from personal experience. However, it appears to be a great placement, and fits pretty perfectly with my requests. Although, I think the main reason I was placed there is because I specifically requested elementary and because of my level of Japanese. Nagahama is ahead of most of the country in terms of English education in elementary schools, I hear.

moonbeam
July 5th, 2016, 15:05
I requested south Honshu because I had visited it before and then a random placement way up north to 'try something new'. I got placed right in the middle and it turned out to be perfect.

ambrosse
July 5th, 2016, 15:52
I got my first choice of prefecture. Requested rural, got rural.
My town is a "you have to drive, or you don't go to work" kind of place.

Owning a car here isn't as difficult as people make it out to be.
I have no regrets. My life in Mie would suck if I didn't have a car. I still take the train if I'm going outside the prefecture, but the convenience is just unrivaled. Especially during the rainy/typhoon season.

mrcharisma
July 6th, 2016, 02:35
Right, that is my point though. ALT placement requests are mostly a toss up but if you don't check the willing to drive box then you can at least exercise a modicum of control over something regarding your placement. Had I not checked that box I wouldn't have been given my current placement. Doesn't mean I would've gotten a better one but I probably wouldn't have gotten a placement where a car is necessary. You do hear the odd story of a non-driving ALT being placed somewhere where they probably should have a car, but based on what I've seen the driving question is one factor that does make a difference with placements. Take any advantage you can, no matter how insignificant it seems. I had thought the question insignificant when filling out my application but was proved wrong the hard way.

Not ticking the "drive" box is more likely to see your application rejected than see them give you a nice urban placement. That's absolutely terrible advice. Being unwilling or unable to drive as an adult will always be seen as a negative even if the "official" line says otherwise.

Obviously plenty of non-drivers get in but if there's one space left, 2 equal applicants and only one with a license or willingness to use it, who's going to get the job?

Ebi
July 6th, 2016, 07:33
Not ticking the "drive" box is more likely to see your application rejected than see them give you a nice urban placement. That's absolutely terrible advice. Being unwilling or unable to drive as an adult will always be seen as a negative even if the "official" line says otherwise.

Obviously plenty of non-drivers get in but if there's one space left, 2 equal applicants and only one with a license or willingness to use it, who's going to get the job?
I've heard it becomes a negative especially if you become an alternate since it means that they have to skip over you any time a placement pops up that isn't drive-able. There are only so many upgrades every year...

ticktockticktock
July 6th, 2016, 09:03
I've heard it becomes a negative especially if you become an alternate since it means that they have to skip over you any time a placement pops up that isn't drive-able. There are only so many upgrades every year...

I've actually heard that the difference it makes on your application is minor or negligible. There are plenty of JETs who answered no to that question and got in. Had I known that at the time of applying I would not have checked the box. I would rather have taken the small risk of it having a negative effect on my application or possibly delaying my placement (if it has an effect at all, which it may not) if that ensured that I wouldn't get placed in an isolated location that requires a car. My advice applies to someone for whom location has some importance, who does not want a rural placement, and who can drive but would really prefer not to.

I've met far too many ALTs who requested super rural with cars and got the middle of a big city, and visa versa. Maybe you'll get lucky and even if you check the box and request urban you'll get urban. But maybe you'll get something more like mine, where I was unlucky and got a placement that is almost the exact opposite of what was in my requests. I went ahead with it because I knew to expect the unexpected with JET and ESID and all that, but I do wish I had approached the car question more critically on my application. It's a calculated risk that is worth taking for the kind of person I mentioned above.

Jiggit
July 6th, 2016, 10:54
Another thing to consider is that you might get a rural placement right next to your school. So long as you can get to work they might not care that you only have one tiny supermarket and a soba restaurant within a 30 minutes cycle ride. Driving is something that makes you more valuable and therefore more likely to be placed at all. It seems a bit premature to try and game the system when you have no guarantee you'll even get in.

OatsCurrySummer
July 6th, 2016, 11:08
Another thing to consider is that you might get a rural placement right next to your school. So long as you can get to work they might not care that you only have one tiny supermarket and a soba restaurant within a 30 minutes cycle ride.
Ok, that was alarmingly accurate. I live next to my school and there's only one soba restaurant and a tiny JA on the island.

Ini
July 6th, 2016, 11:11
http://www.bs4.jp/aisya_henreki/onair/36/img/guest.jpg

Jiggit
July 6th, 2016, 11:16
I don't disagree. I have a decent sized town with supermarkets, electronic stores, home stores, drug stores, many restaurants, booze shops, a second hand store and so on all within 10 minutes walk. I still wish I had a car fairly often, and that's even with very generous proper adult friends helping me out often. Driving isn't a bad thing, even if you live in the middle of a medium city.

Besides, we all know you're coming for the poon, and no real woman wants to take the bus back to your apartment.

uthinkimlost?
July 6th, 2016, 11:34
So long as you can get to work they might not care that you only have one tiny supermarket and a soba restaurant within a 30 minutes cycle ride.

This happens, and the non-driving people that wind up in these positions are hassles for every person around them, ALT and JTE alike.

vaterross
July 6th, 2016, 11:37
Requested Kobe, Hyogo-ken, and Tokyo. Had notes about mild climate, urban, and on the sea. Was placed nearby in a place that matched my notes nicely but that I never would have requested.

Penguinonfire
July 6th, 2016, 14:16
I requested 2 places near Tokyo, Kanagawa and Saitama (yea, yea, I know now but I didn't then!) as well as Nara. Ended up in Ibaraki. Which, while it is the lowest rated prefecture in Japan, is in a really good location for travel and I'm very happy with it.
I live 3 minutes from my school by bike, and all the shopping and entertainment I need is within easy biking distance, yet I still bought a car. It's way more convenient, and I really really hate rainy weather, especially in Japan.

mothy
July 6th, 2016, 15:24
I would have loved Ibaraki.

mrcharisma
July 6th, 2016, 19:40
I've actually heard that the difference it makes on your application is minor or negligible. There are plenty of JETs who answered no to that question and got in. Had I known that at the time of applying I would not have checked the box. I would rather have taken the small risk of it having a negative effect on my application or possibly delaying my placement (if it has an effect at all, which it may not) if that ensured that I wouldn't get placed in an isolated location that requires a car. My advice applies to someone for whom location has some importance, who does not want a rural placement, and who can drive but would really prefer not to.

I've met far too many ALTs who requested super rural with cars and got the middle of a big city, and visa versa. Maybe you'll get lucky and even if you check the box and request urban you'll get urban. But maybe you'll get something more like mine, where I was unlucky and got a placement that is almost the exact opposite of what was in my requests. I went ahead with it because I knew to expect the unexpected with JET and ESID and all that, but I do wish I had approached the car question more critically on my application. It's a calculated risk that is worth taking for the kind of person I mentioned above.

As Jiggit has said though, there are plenty of non-driving placements in the middle of nowhere too. As long as you can cycle to school or a combini within a reasonable time the BOE will likely consider it "non-driving", they aren't going to take into account how close the nearest Starbucks is.

A good applicant will get in license or not, but why make it more difficult for yourself by limiting the placements you can take? Not ticking the box when you could have done doesn't give you a ticket to a placement in Akihabara, it simply limits your chances of success a bit more.

NatDoug
July 7th, 2016, 03:09
Thanks for clarifying SF. How long do they normally take to notify you of a placement after you have been upgraded? I was upgraded on June 9th and I haven't heard a chirp yet.

ticktockticktock
July 7th, 2016, 07:24
As Jiggit has said though, there are plenty of non-driving placements in the middle of nowhere too. As long as you can cycle to school or a combini within a reasonable time the BOE will likely consider it "non-driving", they aren't going to take into account how close the nearest Starbucks is.

A good applicant will get in license or not, but why make it more difficult for yourself by limiting the placements you can take? Not ticking the box when you could have done doesn't give you a ticket to a placement in Akihabara, it simply limits your chances of success a bit more.

Ah, so not ticking the box doesn't guarantee a place in Tokyo? Shoot, then let me retract everything I said ;)

Again, it's a calculated risk, and one worth taking for the kind of person I mentioned in my previous post. It doesn't apply to anyone who wants to do JET at any cost and doesn't care about location.

If someone who answers no to the driving question gets unlucky by ending up somewhere where they probably should have a car, then that's just the luck of the draw. At least they can then drive if they need to. But it will tip the odds more in your favor of not getting a car-needed placement and thus likely something less isolated. The short advice here for someone applying is if you don't want to drive and want something less rural, answering no to that question may work to your benefit if you're willing to take a risk of it possibly prolonging your placement notification or possibly hurting your chances of getting in, both of which are not likely. Based on what I and others have witnessed, that question seems to be taken into consideration by Tokyo more than ALT placement requests are. However, if you're desperate to get on JET by any means then go ahead, check yes and roll the dice, just don't get your hopes up.

There are plenty of alternatives to JET out there that do give you more say over where you're placed, have placements in more controlled locations that are known to the applicant beforehand, or at least are more forthcoming to applicants about it. JET still offers a decent package for newcomers to Japan compared to many competitors but the benefits have been on the decline in recent years which unfortunately makes its weaknesses more apparent. I say be a capitalist: Use any advantage you can get, apply to multiple programs, and go with the one that satisfies your needs the best.

Ini
July 7th, 2016, 07:35
If you were being a capitalist I don't think you would value a year of your working life spent doing some minimum wage job in Japan when you just spent a small fortune on a university degree.

mothy
July 7th, 2016, 07:48
If you were being a capitalist I don't think you would value a year of your working life spent doing some minimum wage job in Japan when you just spent a small fortune on a university degree.

So true.

uthinkimlost?
July 7th, 2016, 08:18
Again, it's a calculated risk, and one worth taking for the kind of person I mentioned in my previous post. It doesn't apply to anyone who wants to do JET at any cost and doesn't care about location.

If someone who answers no to the driving question gets unlucky by ending up somewhere where they probably should have a car, then that's just the luck of the draw. At least they can then drive if they need to. But it will tip the odds more in your favor of not getting a car-needed placement and thus likely something less isolated. The short advice here for someone applying is if you don't want to drive and want something less rural, answering no to that question may work to your benefit if you're willing to take a risk of it possibly prolonging your placement notification or possibly hurting your chances of getting in, both of which are not likely.

citation needed


Based on what I and others have witnessed, that question seems to be taken into consideration by Tokyo more than ALT placement requests are.

citation needed

This happens every year. A bunch of ALTs and CIRs get together, compare stories, tell eachother half-truths, and then everyone thinks they've got a handle on how things work.

Jiggit
July 7th, 2016, 08:31
Haha guys, it's interesting that you have other anecdotal experiences and opinions that directly oppose mine, but I think we're all in agreement that my groundless assertions are correct, right? Right? Cool.

webstaa
July 7th, 2016, 08:31
I have a bunch of friends/acquaintances in Miyagi and Sendai - some of them in the middle of nowhere who have never driven a car before and are 20 minutes of walking away from their schools/shops, and others who live in cities and towns (like Sendai itself) who aren't allowed to drive to work - or even drive at all. I don't think checking that box had any much of any impact on their placement. But then again I know of at least two placements that required a driver's license because the BoE required them to drive to rather distant schools using the town's vehicles.

mrcharisma
July 7th, 2016, 08:59
However, if you're desperate to get on JET by any means then go ahead, check yes and roll the dice, just don't get your hopes up.


Hopes up for what?

You're something special. First time I've heard ticking the driving box described as a sign of desperation.

ticktockticktock
July 7th, 2016, 13:23
Hopes up for what?

You're something special. First time I've heard ticking the driving box described as a sign of desperation.

If you had been following my post instead of cherry picking, the desperation described is for someone who isn't willing or doesn't want to drive, and who has some personal preferences in regards to location but who wants to make it on JET no matter what and is willing to forgo any of that or any of the numerous JET alternatives simply to be accepted and placed on JET. That is desperation. Getting hopes up is referring to someone like this answering yes to the car question and still hoping that JET will in fact place them where they requested or close to it. I won't repeat myself about this again.


citation needed



citation needed

This happens every year. A bunch of ALTs and CIRs get together, compare stories, tell eachother half-truths, and then everyone thinks they've got a handle on how things work.

So you're asking for an academic source on a topic that will clearly never be written about in a peer-reviewed scholarly publication and ignoring everything I said about the deliberately closed doors surrounding the placement process and how all we can do is play the odds in our favor, implying that there is not and will never will be a 100% guarantee of anything with placements. All we can do is look at others' placements vs. their requests and how the car question played into that. I and other folks have noticed a trend based on the best sources available: firsthand experience seeing what happened to other ALTs on the program. Everything I've been saying has been encouraging people who don't want to drive to answer no to that question, unless their willingness to do JET supersedes their own wants. Same as above, this will be the last time I repeat myself or respond to this topic. So cherry pick and obfuscate away.

I do find the bully-like reaction to my simple suggestion for a small number of applicants with a specific set of preferences interesting. The lack of transparency over ALT placements is just one of the weaknesses of JET that is beginning to see more scrutiny over the years as the benefits of JET continue to decrease while competitors are on the rise. It's still a great opportunity for many people and I'd like to think it will continue to be in the long-term, but if it doesn't tweak some of its practices I don't see it finding much more success after the Olympics are done. The alternatives to JET are starting to become more and more desirable, not only for potential ALTs but for the schools as well.

OatsCurrySummer
July 7th, 2016, 13:28
*grabs popcorn*

Cbill1
July 7th, 2016, 13:37
I feel like there's a simple answer to this:

If you want to drive in Japan, check yes.

If you don't want to drive in Japan, check no

Obsessing over whether or not checking 'no' to the driving question is going to hurt your application isn't doing you any good, and is the kind of behavior that will get flagged by the interviewers as 'Do not send this person to Japan.'

uthinkimlost?
July 7th, 2016, 14:08
So you're asking for an academic source on a topic that will clearly never be written about in a peer-reviewed scholarly publication and ignoring everything I said about the deliberately closed doors surrounding the placement process and how all we can do is play the odds in our favor, implying that there is not and will never will be a 100% guarantee of anything with placements. All we can do is look at others' placements vs. their requests and how the car question played into that. I and other folks have noticed a trend based on the best sources available: firsthand experience seeing what happened to other ALTs on the program. Everything I've been saying has been encouraging people who don't want to drive to answer no to that question, unless their willingness to do JET supersedes their own wants. Same as above, this will be the last time I repeat myself or respond to this topic. So cherry pick and obfuscate away.

I'm asking you to explain the information used for your reasoning. If you can't give it, that's cool. You've thus far shown nothing to back up the claim that not ticking the drive box may help you get the kind of placement you want.



I do find the bully-like reaction to my simple suggestion for a small number of applicants with a specific set of preferences interesting. The lack of transparency over ALT placements is just one of the weaknesses of JET that is beginning to see more scrutiny over the years as the benefits of JET continue to decrease while competitors are on the rise. It's still a great opportunity for many people and I'd like to think it will continue to be in the long-term, but if it doesn't tweak some of its practices I don't see it finding much more success after the Olympics are done. The alternatives to JET are starting to become more and more desirable, not only for potential ALTs but for the schools as well.

I'm not sure what the first sentence has to do with the rest of your paragraph, but if you feel you're being bullied because people are disagreeing with your conclusions and lack of transparent reasoning, you've got a long road ahead.

And yes, JET is going down the shit hole in slow motion.

Jiggit
July 7th, 2016, 14:10
Guy stop cherry picking out the parts of my post my entire point is based on, that's mean and I'm gonna tell the teacher.

mrcharisma
July 7th, 2016, 19:06
If you had been following my post instead of cherry picking, the desperation described is for someone who isn't willing or doesn't want to drive, and who has some personal preferences in regards to location but who wants to make it on JET no matter what and is willing to forgo any of that or any of the numerous JET alternatives simply to be accepted and placed on JET. That is desperation. Getting hopes up is referring to someone like this answering yes to the car question and still hoping that JET will in fact place them where they requested or close to it. I won't repeat myself about this again.



So you're asking for an academic source on a topic that will clearly never be written about in a peer-reviewed scholarly publication and ignoring everything I said about the deliberately closed doors surrounding the placement process and how all we can do is play the odds in our favor, implying that there is not and will never will be a 100% guarantee of anything with placements. All we can do is look at others' placements vs. their requests and how the car question played into that. I and other folks have noticed a trend based on the best sources available: firsthand experience seeing what happened to other ALTs on the program. Everything I've been saying has been encouraging people who don't want to drive to answer no to that question, unless their willingness to do JET supersedes their own wants. Same as above, this will be the last time I repeat myself or respond to this topic. So cherry pick and obfuscate away.

I do find the bully-like reaction to my simple suggestion for a small number of applicants with a specific set of preferences interesting. The lack of transparency over ALT placements is just one of the weaknesses of JET that is beginning to see more scrutiny over the years as the benefits of JET continue to decrease while competitors are on the rise. It's still a great opportunity for many people and I'd like to think it will continue to be in the long-term, but if it doesn't tweak some of its practices I don't see it finding much more success after the Olympics are done. The alternatives to JET are starting to become more and more desirable, not only for potential ALTs but for the schools as well.

What if an applicant has a driving license but doesn't tick the box, then in interview is asked why they are unwilling to drive? What would you recommend as an answer?

Gizmotech
July 8th, 2016, 03:01
What if an applicant has a driving license but doesn't tick the box, then in interview is asked why they are unwilling to drive? What would you recommend as an answer?

Driving is a stressful encounter, especially when I need to relearn how to be in the middle of the road. I should be exposed to it, as it triggers my ptsdqfries which is entirely relevant to anyone I will encounter. Didn't you see that based on my entirely accurate (and complete lacking) medical report?

mrcharisma
July 8th, 2016, 05:06
Driving is a stressful encounter, especially when I need to relearn how to be in the middle of the road. I should be exposed to it, as it triggers my ptsdqfries which is entirely relevant to anyone I will encounter. Didn't you see that based on my entirely accurate (and complete lacking) medical report? lol I remember on the official forums a few years back - some herbivore applicant saying the thought of driving in Japan was giving him anxiety attacks, even though he'd ticked the box.

Naturally the carebears all told him to be honest and that revealing himself as a snivelling wreck wouldn't affect his chances.

What I don't think Ticktock understands is that whilst having no license isn't a problem (especially in the UK), having one yet saying you are unwilling to use it is always going to be a massive red flag.

acpc2203
July 8th, 2016, 08:31
The worst parts about driving in Japan are kei trucks and ancient people riding bicycles/walking in the middle of the road.

Lianwen
July 8th, 2016, 09:47
True story. American driving the car this weekend was in the wrong lane. We were going against traffic (no cars yet) and tried to tell him multiple times (myself and other friend) he was in the right lane and needed to pull into the left lane. Brushed us off several times with 'I know, I know'. Didn't register to him until a kei truck almost smashed into us. Turns out he thought it was a two-lane one way road (common in the area). Has been driving for 10 years, 2 of those in Japan.

My my position on JET required a car. Lived in BFI but local grocery store was 40min by car/train. Took a taxi to my schools. Cost my BOE a pretty penny. I don't drive.

acpc2203
July 8th, 2016, 09:50
I don't drive.
http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/648/307/424.jpg

uthinkimlost?
July 8th, 2016, 09:53
No hottorinking, brah.

Lianwen is terrible, too. Wonder why she wasn't liked?

acpc2203
July 8th, 2016, 09:57
No hottorinking, brah.

Lianwen is terrible, too. Wonder why she wasn't liked?
there we go

Lianwen
July 8th, 2016, 10:05
No hottorinking, brah.

Lianwen is terrible, too. Wonder why she wasn't liked?

To be fair, it wasn't just me who could drive. The other ALTs couldn't either.

Wasabi
July 12th, 2016, 12:40
Took a BOE sponsored taxi to school? Wow, awesome. How'd you think the taxpayers would react if those expense records were released? :)

Jiggit
July 12th, 2016, 12:53
Lianwen is a walking, irrefutable argument for the total abolition of the JET programme and reinstatement of the isolationist policies of the Tokugawa Shogunate.

Lianwen
July 12th, 2016, 12:58
Took a BOE sponsored taxi to school? Wow, awesome. How'd you think the taxpayers would react if those expense records were released? :)

Id love to see reactions, because the other ALTs and I even offered to take the buses instead of which there was usually one running in the direction of the schools we were going to). I spent about 4K a day on taxis usually, just to go to my visit schools and get told I didn't have any classes that day etc. And buses were about 100yen each.

Jiggit
July 12th, 2016, 13:07
They knew what would happen if they left you to figure out the bus schedule by yourself.

OatsCurrySummer
July 12th, 2016, 13:09
Lianwen is a walking, irrefutable argument for the total abolition of the JET programme and reinstatement of the isolationist policies of the Tokugawa Shogunate.
Considering the state of the US election thus far, Sakoku Rei might become a viable choice yet again.

fryfry
July 12th, 2016, 13:22
Lianwen is a walking, irrefutable argument for the total abolition of the JET programme and reinstatement of the isolationist policies of the Tokugawa Shogunate.fun times. just hope they don't send those icky Christians to my town to get their heads chopped off.

OatsCurrySummer
July 12th, 2016, 13:27
fun times. just hope they don't send those icky Christians to my town to get their heads chopped off.
Got cornered by some fucking mormons last week in Chatan (American village). Hailed a cab just to get out.

fryfry
July 12th, 2016, 14:11
Got cornered by some fucking mormons last week in Chatan (American village). Hailed a cab just to get out.oh the humanity. I can understand the military bases, but MORMONS...?

Actually, I've had a mormon friend for a while who's cool. He's pretty secretive about his religion. I don't really have any problems with Christians, either; this board just makes it easy to act edgy.

OatsCurrySummer
July 12th, 2016, 14:20
I don't really have any problems with Christians, either; this board just makes it easy to act edgy.
I went to Catholic school for 14 years, and I've got a real bone to pick with every Abrahamic religion.

fryfry
July 12th, 2016, 14:34
I've seen that Catholics usually end up either not taking their religion so seriously (hence more like modern Jews), or leaving it. Of course then there's the third kind, who touch little kids.
Pope Francis is kinda cool.

mothy
July 12th, 2016, 14:49
It really depends on the person more than the religion. Some of them are obnoxiously pushy and are in your face about it, like a Roppongi tout, while others are cool to talk to, but just let you know in a casual way they have it if you need it, like a Portland drug dealer.

fryfry
July 12th, 2016, 14:55
I can see that. After a few years of living here, I'm almost sure Portland is where most of the world's laid-backness comes from.

Jiggit
July 12th, 2016, 15:18
The problem with religious friends is that even if they come across normal you've always got that little voice in the back of your head reminding you that they're at least a little bit stupid.

OatsCurrySummer
July 12th, 2016, 15:50
I've seen that Catholics usually end up either not taking their religion so seriously (hence more like modern Jews), or leaving it. Of course then there's the third kind, who touch little kids.
Pope Francis is kinda cool.
You forgot option 4: Become the anti-Christ and laugh at all the thousands you swindled out of your extended family because of Baptism, Communion and Confirmation ceremonies.

Frap
July 12th, 2016, 15:51
The problem with religious friends is that even if they come across normal you've always got that little voice in the back of your head reminding you that they're at least a little bit stupid.

t h i s
h
i
s

acpc2203
July 12th, 2016, 15:52
t h i s
h
i
s
What did he mean by this?

mothy
July 12th, 2016, 16:45
Seems kind of stupid. Now I'll never be able to get out of the back of my head he's a little bit stupid.

Frap
July 12th, 2016, 16:50
LOL

OatsCurrySummer
July 12th, 2016, 16:52
Seems kind of stupid. Now I'll never be able to get out of the back of my head he's a little bit stupid.
Frap only ever wants to be at the back of your head.