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JestersJ
January 17th, 2015, 06:05
I get heavy migraines without glasses. I know to keep a prescription with me and all but I have the type of eyes that like to flip on me a lot and change.

I also have a condition where I need prism lenses. (They're a type of lens to fix a condition I have, it's not a condition you can see with the naked eye but I have a lot of double vision because of it. My eyes won't rest at the same level of vision, my left eye is trying to look higher than my right eye most of the time. Hence the heavy migraines.)


I'm not sure if prism lenses are even common enough to be able to have a replacement pair if my prescription changes? I have two pairs, a 'at work' pair and a pair more for outdoor/rough housing/sports.

Although I'm not in Japan currently, I intend on working as a teacher regardless if I pass the JET interviews or not.
I also do not have vision insurance in the U.S. anymore after the first of March, so even if I got to Japan and needed replacements with new prescriptions, I don't have insurance to not pay $600 for a pair of glasses... any suggestions anyone? Are prism lenses known enough there even if I have to travel to Tokyo or Osaka to see someone about it?




I'm trying to be prepared for these things early while I still have a month of insurance left here in the states!


EDIT: it is a condition in which I have to always wear my glasses.

uthinkimlost?
January 17th, 2015, 09:13
Prism has been in option on every prescription slip I've gotten here.

your biggest enemy is under prescription, where they give you a weaker prescription so your eyes don't get 'lazy'. You have to argue with the opthalmologist at a lot of clinics.

Gizmotech
January 17th, 2015, 10:59
All optometrists and ophthalmologists and opticians will all know about prism. It's a standard feature of lenses for professionals.

Also, you might actually get better turn around on lenses being here in Japan. I know many of the prism RXs we ordered were nikon specifics (based on the 4 and 5 series lenses) out of Japan. They were often faster than our local labs (and that's sad as from japan was about 2 weeks).

You also won't need to go to a big city so long as someone can translate for you where you are.

Penguee
January 18th, 2015, 09:37
I heard the way to get around getting a crappy prescription to getting one that actually allows you to see is to tell them you need to see well enough to drive.
BAM! A prescription that should allow you to see fairly well.

uthinkimlost?
January 18th, 2015, 09:51
Their definition of well-enough to drive is being able to tell which side is open on a C. The clarity of the shape doesn't matter, just being able to see the blank area.

if you want to be close to the kind of prescription you'd get in America, you're likely going to have to fight for it.

Zolrak 22
January 18th, 2015, 10:32
if you want to be close to the kind of prescription you'd get in America, you're likely going to have to fight for it.

That's actually kind of depressing.

Is this because of the whole, "We know better" way of thinking followed by doctors over there or is there another reason?

JestersJ
January 18th, 2015, 10:43
I'm hoping to be able to just hand them my prescription and get any spare pairs I need that way then...

Thank you all for the feedback! Helps a lot

Gizmotech
January 18th, 2015, 11:09
They aren't gonna have to fight for it if there is prism in the lens.

uthinkimlost?
January 18th, 2015, 12:34
Yeah, I'm more talking about nearsighted and farsighted prescriptions.

johnny
January 19th, 2015, 07:38
There is the belief that eyes get lazy? Where on earth did they get that idea?

Gizmotech
January 19th, 2015, 08:11
We call it lazy eye, but it's not. It's a sensory adaptation to eyes not focusing together correctly like they should due to a variety of causes, most notably reduced muscle control in one eye relative to the other.


If you really care, read this.
Strabismus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strabismus)

uthinkimlost?
January 19th, 2015, 08:16
A fair amount of eye doctors here seem to believe that if you aren't mildly straining to see things, your eyes will stop working to focus. (Or at least that is my understanding. Gizmo might know more about the reasoning, my opthalmogist(s) just told me I could see fine with my 'very strong prescription' that was weaker than the one I came in with.) In America it is considered to be an old wives' tale, and I never found any study confirming it. Judging by my students that still squint at the board, even though they have glasses and are in the front row, it is a pretty commonly held belief.

Edit: Oh look, beaten to the post.

Zolrak 22
January 19th, 2015, 08:21
Judging by my students that still squint at the board, even though they have glasses and are in the front row, it is pretty common.

That brings back memories, elementary school kids who's parents didn't believe they needed glasses.

Oh precious childhood memories.

Jiggit
January 19th, 2015, 08:27
I just went to a glasses shop and asked for the same prescription. Wasn't any kind of issue.

uthinkimlost?
January 19th, 2015, 08:34
That was a shop. Plus you had no vision change. My future will look something like this: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_vYW-kExXyII/TN7QCwZyZxI/AAAAAAAAABo/4GYsJQrovdo/s1600/geri.jpg

On the plus side, you do get to wear nifty Mad Max-style glasses instead of sitting behind the (insert apparatus name here) that they have in Murrica as they have you read the chart. So there's that. https://edc2.healthtap.com/ht-staging/user_answer/reference_image/9791/large/Optometrists.jpeg?1386670652

I hear there are Eye Clinics that follow a more western approach, but I haven't found one in my prefecture yet.

Jiggit
January 19th, 2015, 08:37
It's always all about you, isn't it, util?

Also you live in buttfuck nowhere in the 1980s. Try going to somewhere people under the age of 117 live.

uthinkimlost?
January 19th, 2015, 08:46
We're in the 1970s, thank you.

SomePeopleJustSaySnow
January 19th, 2015, 09:38
On the plus side, you do get to wear nifty Mad Max-style glasses instead of sitting behind the (insert apparatus name here) that they have in Murrica as they have you read the chart. So there's that.

I hear there are Eye Clinics that follow a more western approach, but I haven't found one in my prefecture yet.

I got a nifty machine. It was nifty.

johnny
January 19th, 2015, 09:46
We call it lazy eye, but it's not. It's a sensory adaptation to eyes not focusing together correctly like they should due to a variety of causes, most notably reduced muscle control in one eye relative to the other.


If you really care, read this.
Strabismus - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strabismus)

Yeah, I've heard about lazy eye, but I'm positive it isn't caused by having a proper prescription. I could ask my parents about it though. Both of them are optometrists.

And for whoever cares, the nifty machine is called a phoropter.

Gizmotech
January 19th, 2015, 11:56
A fair amount of eye doctors here seem to believe that if you aren't mildly straining to see things, your eyes will stop working to focus. (Or at least that is my understanding. Gizmo might know more about the reasoning, my opthalmogist(s) just told me I could see fine with my 'very strong prescription' that was weaker than the one I came in with.) In America it is considered to be an old wives' tale, and I never found any study confirming it. Judging by my students that still squint at the board, even though they have glasses and are in the front row, it is a pretty commonly held belief.

Edit: Oh look, beaten to the post.


Ahh, when he said lazy eye I thought he meant the medical condition.

The "your eyes need to work harder" thing is just bullshit. Another old wives tale. Your eyes are working 100% all the time, and the less they have to focus to achieve precision the better off they are. They don't get weaker because you didn't use them, they get weaker over time because they are being used and growing old.

The eyes are one of the worst designed parts of the body and definitely do not have lifespans equal to the rest of our parts. They start failing at 40 and get worse from there.

Virgil
January 27th, 2015, 02:54
The eyes are one of the worst designed parts of the body and definitely do not have lifespans equal to the rest of our parts. They start failing at 40 and get worse from there.

For some reason this bugs me.

johnny
January 27th, 2015, 06:48
I don't think Gizmo is going all biblical on you.

Gizmotech
January 27th, 2015, 08:36
For some reason this bugs me.

Ya sorry... purely talking mechanical crap.

Let's read "worst designed" instead as "least evolved for long term viability"

johnny
January 27th, 2015, 08:40
Though in evolutionary terms, the eye is absolutely amazing.

The long term viability of the eye may also become a concern of the past with some of the new technology coming out.

Ini
January 27th, 2015, 09:33
?????? and what pray tell is this technology?

Gizmotech
January 27th, 2015, 10:02
?????? and what pray tell is this technology?

There's been a lot of work recently in mapping basic CMOS sensors to the nerve bundle that gets sent to the brain. Functionally speaking, the eye itself is a pretty basic part of the body and most of the work is done by the brain. It's really nowhere near as complicated as say the cochlea or sensitivity in the skin. They managed to map some basic CMOS data via a processor to a nerve implant so an individual could get basic contrast information (think grey scale, really fuzzy super super low resolution picture). It's not great, but it's a pretty huge start at replacing a nervous system interface part, rather than something like the heart which just needs to run regularly.

johnny
January 27th, 2015, 10:45
And while eye disease is still a problem (macular degeneration, glaucoma), treatment of the diseases is improving greatly.

In terms of fixing eye sight, there are some interesting options that may be coming out. For example, some companies are trying to do more with intraocular lenses, which are now only used for cataract surgeries. Soon they may be used to correct very poor vision. I gather the hope is that they'll be able to do more than laser surgery can accomplish because it will be an artificial lens.

This technology is still in its infancy, but the possible implications are very exciting.

sharpinthefang
January 27th, 2015, 12:21
First two rows of my class were out today, and the back row had students standing up to come closer and see the board. Suggested that the students sit in the empty seats for the day as we were doing a lot of writing. That went down like a lead balloon.

Zolrak 22
January 27th, 2015, 12:24
That went down like a lead balloon.

"But, um, ano, etto ... It's not our seat! "

?