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emperor_ing
January 20th, 2015, 06:30
Since obtaining my interview notification I've had some doubts whether to go ahead with it, as my circumstances are different from when I first applied. At the time of applying I was over a year out of uni with no job, and it seemed like a good idea for a change of direction in where I eventually want to end up. (A change in career from programmer, which I now know isn't really for me, to teaching/lecturing in further and higher education). However, I've since landed a decently-paying job in my qualified sector which I could stick at in order to save up for an eventual return to university. As such I have two options: go ahead and take the JET interview and have to go through the job-hunting process again when I get back if I am successful; or stay where I am and keep earning towards this career change. Now, I'm leaning on this second, safer option, although being torn with all the work I've put into the application process I don't want to let it go to waste; and I want to make a decision I won't regret later. I think my fear is if I quit now I won't get another chance to do JET later; there's always Interac of course, but my main question is if I pull out before the interview, could I re-apply 2-3 years down the line?

TL;DR - Thinking of pulling out before interview due to career direction, will I be able to re-apply in subsequent years if I change my mind?

Zolrak 22
January 20th, 2015, 06:40
You should be able to apply in 2-3 years.

If I'm not mistaken, should you refuse placement or interview, you have to wait a year before applying.

(If you refuse 2015, you can apply for 2017)

kmep0
January 20th, 2015, 06:57
If the consequences for refusing a placement / interview are the same as Zolrak suggests, I would take a day off work and just go to the interview. It would be fun just to see how it goes and to see inside the embassy. At least this way you have an idea how the interview would be, should you reapply later on in life.

Antonath
January 20th, 2015, 07:01
You can reapply the next year with no issue, as far as I know. The "no reapplications the following year" rule doesn't kick in until you've been accepted and been given a placement, to avoid people dropping out and looking for a "better" placement the next time.

Zolrak 22
January 20th, 2015, 07:23
You can reapply the next year with no issue, as far as I know. The "no reapplications the following year" rule doesn't kick in until you've been accepted and been given a placement, to avoid people dropping out and looking for a "better" placement the next time.
You are correct [emoji1] , I checked the website to make sure.

It says you can reapply if you refuse interview.

The placement is the kicker, don't refuse that one.

mothy
January 20th, 2015, 08:13
JET isn't all that. I'd cancel the interview if I had other options.

AyaReiko
January 20th, 2015, 09:47
The other option is to go for JET and see how you actually like teaching (although at lower levels) before you invest in school again!

mothy
January 20th, 2015, 10:20
Yeah let the horrible education system here suck all the joy out of teaching, leaving you without motivation for further schooling and once again unsure of what you want to do with your life.

Libellule
January 20th, 2015, 15:43
The other option is to go for JET and see how you actually like teaching (although at lower levels) before you invest in school again!

Being an ALT and teaching in a western country are very different. If you want to know what teaching is like, volunteer in a classroom at a level you'd want to teach and talk with the teacher about what they do.

Jiggit
January 20th, 2015, 15:45
JET "teaching" and teaching in a western country are very different imo. If you want to know what teaching is like, volunteer in a classroom at a level you'd want to teach and talk with the teacher about what they do.

ALTs aren't teachers, principally. Unfortunately no-one told the JTEs that and they amazingly don't seem to notice.

Ini
January 20th, 2015, 15:46
JET "teaching" has more in common with kindergarten cop than actual teaching in a western country.

http://i.imgur.com/wWentVp.gif

uthinkimlost?
January 20th, 2015, 15:47
Damn. I've been modeling my lessons on Jingle All the Way and Commando.

Jiggit
January 20th, 2015, 15:52
We're going to play a wonderful game... it's called ah screw it, let's just play bingo again.

miamicoordinator
January 21st, 2015, 02:10
Since obtaining my interview notification I've had some doubts whether to go ahead with it, as my circumstances are different from when I first applied. At the time of applying I was over a year out of uni with no job, and it seemed like a good idea for a change of direction in where I eventually want to end up. (A change in career from programmer, which I now know isn't really for me, to teaching/lecturing in further and higher education). However, I've since landed a decently-paying job in my qualified sector which I could stick at in order to save up for an eventual return to university. As such I have two options: go ahead and take the JET interview and have to go through the job-hunting process again when I get back if I am successful; or stay where I am and keep earning towards this career change. Now, I'm leaning on this second, safer option, although being torn with all the work I've put into the application process I don't want to let it go to waste; and I want to make a decision I won't regret later. I think my fear is if I quit now I won't get another chance to do JET later; there's always Interac of course, but my main question is if I pull out before the interview, could I re-apply 2-3 years down the line?

TL;DR - Thinking of pulling out before interview due to career direction, will I be able to re-apply in subsequent years if I change my mind?

Your experience on the JET Program canm be great, but it can be miserable as well. There are great placements and BoEs, and horrible ones. The problem is, you don't know what you are going to get until you arrive in Japan. Your pred may have hated their placement, but you could love it, so until you experience life in (insert placement here) it is impossible to tell.

Refusing your interview will have no negative consequences if you do decide to reapply in the future. So you are safe there.

Many JETs return to the US and have a terrible time finding a job because their degrees may not be in demand (especially true with many liberal arts degrees).

In the end you should do what is best for your future. If JET is something you have wanted to do your whole life, and you would feel like something is missing if you didn't do it, then go for it. I think you should at least go to the interview, and wait to see if you get short listed. You can still decline without any repercussions as long as you do not know your placement information. (comes usually a month or so later).

You can decide better then. No need to stress out about the decision now when the fact of the matter is you might not make it onto the shortlist. If that is the case, then you can rest easy knowing you already have another job.

JET ProgramCoordinator SF
January 21st, 2015, 05:00
IMO it's always worth keeping your options open. Might as well do the interview. If you don't pass, your decision is made for you and you don't have to worry about any what-ifs. If you do pass, you have until the end of April to back out without any repercussions (really up until mid-May, when we usually get placement results). That's about 3-4 months from now - you never know what could happen between now and then.

AyaReiko
January 21st, 2015, 10:01
The other option is to go for JET and see how you actually like teaching (although at lower levels) before you invest in school again!

Aw yeah, quoting myself!!!

Yeah, I was trying to see a "pro" for "take the interview", but I got a dumb one.

Emperor_ing, What I wonder is: how important is JET to you? I mean, if you don't do it now because you have a good job, when would you do it later? When you have enough money for school and you're ready to take that step? After you're out of school? How important will finding your "life career" be at that point in your life? What if you find a job straight out of uni? basically, if it doesn't fit later one either, will that be a problem for you?

It's a lot of ifs, but that's what you're question is about, I guess. In any case, your final answer is yours to make, ad I wish you good luck finding it!

I'm pro doing the interview and finding out if you're shortlisted though.

emperor_ing
January 21st, 2015, 15:20
Thanks everyone for your comments. If declining before placement information is received is okay (I'm assuming you get some sort of tick box "you've been accepted, do you want to go ahead with it?" beforehand), then I might as well take the interview. I already have the time booked off work; it was simply a case of replying to the JET desk.

Looking at the guidelines it does say


Not have declined a position on the JET Programme after receiving notification of placement in the last JET Programme year (excluding cases where it is accepted that the participant had a valid, inevitable reason for withdrawing, In this case, the applicant must consult with the JET desk prior to application).


So I think I'll be fine either way, I don't plan on re-applying for the 2016 programme, it'd be 2017/2018 at the earliest.

To answer AyaReiko's questions:

How important is JET to you? - Well it's something that I've been working towards for the past year that's only been stopped by my current position, so it's been pretty important to me.
When would you do it later? - I guess that depends on my feelings in the future. If I stick in this job for a couple of years and then get to a point where I'm considering a fresh challenge I could re-apply then; or I could re-apply after doing uni again, which at this point I'm unsure whether it would be another bachelor's or a master's.
How important will finding your "life career" be at that point in your life? - Considering I'd probably be in my late 20's at that point that will be pretty important.
If it doesn't fit later one either, will that be a problem for you? - If that's the case then I may end up regretting not going but again depends which way I end up going.

But yeah I kinda agreed with SF Coord's comments about being flexible and keeping your options open. My current job is safe until the end of April where I'd be having my quarterly review, so I think the application timeline works well with that. So I'm going ahead with it and I just have to await confirmation from the JET desk now.

Apollo87
January 22nd, 2015, 14:13
Dude, just do the interview. It's in two weeks. You may be wishy washy about it now, but that might just be your nerves of moving to another country. You can make a decision once/if you actually get accepted.

Being a JET will offer you employment for at least a year, but it will also afford you ample time to pick up other skills on the side like improving your Japanese, getting better at programming, picking up certs, or even doing an online masters.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 02:02
On JET, your attitude can dictate a lot of what you get out of it. I encourage you to ignore posts that say, "JET has nothing to do with teaching," and stuff like that. If you take it seriously as a future education professional, you can do good things and learn a lot.

Also, you can save a lot of money on JET. You could go from 3 years on JET right back into school.

Note: I was a 3-year ALT, and I have since completed all coursework for a secondary-school social sciences teaching credential.

SFC
February 5th, 2015, 12:47
God this mothy bloke is depressing.

uthinkimlost?
February 5th, 2015, 12:49
He's the ITIL Suicide Siren. His sweet words of misery have drawn many a new ALT to the front of the Keihin Tohoku.

mothy
February 5th, 2015, 12:52
God this mothy bloke is depressing.

Only if you can't hear the truth without feeling depressed. Perhaps your parents and teachers shouldn't have lied to you so much so that you'd be better prepared for mildly unpleasant facts.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 12:54
Only if you can't hear the truth without feeling depressed. Perhaps your parents and teachers shouldn't have lied to you so much so that you'd be better prepared for mildly unpleasant facts.

I'm pretty sure someone who just interviewed and came on here to talk about it is a young human being looking for some words of encouragement and reassurance, not the message that they are likely doomed and not well-rounded. That's rude.

mothy
February 5th, 2015, 12:59
I'm pretty sure someone who just interviewed and came on here to talk about it is a young human being looking for some words of encouragement and reassurance, not the message that they are likely doomed and not well-rounded. That's rude.

To reassure and encourage when it's not called for merely encourages people to persist in their current erroneous path as well as devalue my true words of encouragement.

uthinkimlost?
February 5th, 2015, 13:00
I'm pretty sure someone who just interviewed and came on here to talk about it is a young human being looking for some words of encouragement and reassurance, not the message that they are likely doomed and not well-rounded. That's rude.

I sometimes stand outside of Starbucks and shout, "Way to go, champ!" to the people that turn in applications.

They don't react well.

Jiggit
February 5th, 2015, 13:03
?

I was the first poster who told him that it probably wouldn't matter too much, as did others. The second post was just trying to remind people that there are a lot of famous Japanese people in various fields they might know without realising it, and advising them that if they didn't know anyone even after considering that, they might come across as someone who is not well rounded. It wasn't addressed solely at the OP.

As to wanting to be encouraged, it depends on the person.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 13:13
Yes.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 13:16
I sometimes stand outside of Starbucks and shout, "Way to go, champ!" to the people that turn in applications.

They don't react well.

Totally the same thing.

uthinkimlost?
February 5th, 2015, 13:23
Totally the same thing.

Equally effective.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 13:28
Equally effective.

Except that in this case the person came to a forum where people were talking about the process, presumably (and obviously I could be wrong) in hopes of reassurance or hope.

uthinkimlost?
February 5th, 2015, 13:31
Except that in this case the person came to a forum where people were talking about the process, presumably (and obviously I could be wrong) in hopes of reassurance or hope.
-or they actually want to discuss and diagnose what happened and the mistakes they might have made, since learning from mistakes is the only way to avoid repetition.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 13:32
-or they actually want to discuss and diagnose what happened and the mistakes they might have made, since learning from mistakes is the only way to avoid repetition.

Yeah, totally. I was just addressing the remark about shouting at people outside of Starbucks.

uthinkimlost?
February 5th, 2015, 13:35
Telling people what they want to hear is equally condescending.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 13:39
That can be said, sure. I don't remember stroking egos or anything on here. I did try to be positive and encourage optimism. I was more focused on the results of the interview than personal growth for the future. Not saying that that's not important. It's just not what I understood the purpose of this forum to be. I'll hold of on the encouragement a little bit.

mothy
February 5th, 2015, 14:46
If you want to encourage, encourage. We don't have a hivemind here.