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byakko
February 5th, 2015, 01:21
I was in the JET Program for 2 years (2011-2013), and LOVED it. I made a ton of friends, both Japanese and international. My school situations were good, and I liked my city and apartment. Money was good.

I moved back to the US mostly for my husband. He enjoyed Japan, but without a bachelor's degree he wasn't eligible for a work visa and was getting bored. We decided we needed to return to the US so he could work on his degree. I knew we would miss Japan, but I didn't think I'd regret the decision.

Now, it's been 1.5 years. It's been a struggle. It cost ALL of my savings and pension refund to move back to the US and get settled. My new job is considered high-level, but it's lonely, unrewarding and doesn't pay enough to cover bills and groceries comfortably. I haven't made a single friend. I miss Japan and my friends there pretty much every day.

I basically feel heartbroken, but for a place instead of a person. If someone waved a magic wand and said I could return to my Japan-life tomorrow, I would accept. My husband has even suggested that I do JET again while he does his last two years of university, but I've heard that JET rarely accepts the same person twice. Since I'm not fully bilingual (I'm ~NJLPT 4), I don't think there would be many non-JET work opportunities that would allow me to work in Japan, travel to Japan, or continue learning Japanese.

Does anyone else out there struggle with extended reverse culture shock and crappy home-country economics like this? How are you dealing? Is it a complete fantasy to think about returning to Japan? Or do ex-JETs sometimes do it?

(PS. I live in a small town with no Japanese community. I've made an honest effort to make friends. I'm looking for a better job, preferably in a med-big city.)

Gunjumero
February 5th, 2015, 01:59
In your situation, I'd do something. Do you talk much to your husband about it ?

It's been a year and a half, so I don't think you're judging it too quickly. You were in the US before, I'm not sure how long it should take to get back to your original lifestyle and all but you probably did live there for more than 20 years before (maybe that should help ? )

You realize you're unhappy, you don't like your job, and it doesn't pay enough to support you comfortably. You're lonely and say you have no friend here.

It's too late for this year, do you want to wait another whole year (and more considering the departure are halfway through the year) before doing something ? You said you miss it and your friends every day.

I'm not saying your only solution is to get back to Japan but I sure wish you will do something about your current situation.

I don't have enough meaningful experience to help you further and tell you what to do and what might work but,

You are unhappy, you know it and there's visibly not much that will change soon to change that.

That can't be healthy.

Sorry for the downer reply, but I felt it was necessary.

Zolrak 22
February 5th, 2015, 03:39
If you have the funds you could always try Interac.

In fact, the chances of being placed in your old area are higher.

byakko
February 5th, 2015, 04:13
Thanks Gunjumero, you're right that I need to do *something.* For now, that something is applying to better-paying jobs in American cities that have young professionals I could befriend and Japanese clubs/communities I can participate in.

BifCarbet
February 5th, 2015, 04:33
It seems like you'd be a good candidate for Interac, I do have to agree.

byakko
February 5th, 2015, 06:52
Is it common to miss living in Japan like this? More than occasional nostalgia, but less than major depression?

mothy
February 5th, 2015, 08:25
It really seems like the current situation is the problem. If where you find yourself now isn't a good place, it's natural that you would feel a strong longing for the last good place you were in.

Jiggit
February 5th, 2015, 08:41
Most people feel some regrets but the friends I've had who've since returned only miss it in a nostalgic sense, rather than really wanting to return. I think you're always going to miss some aspects of life here, even if you're thoroughly fed up with the place by the time you leave. If you left before you were ready to you're going to feel a lot of regret and doubts, certainly.

There's probably a part of it that is looking through rose-tinted spectacles, bear that in mind. If you're constantly looking back to a nostalgic situation and comparing it to reality, you'll probably always find it lacking. I'm pretty nostalgic about my university days, but if I'm honest I found it quite stressful and didn't have a great time for a lot of it. Try and get into a more pragmatic frame of mind and think about your current situation. If you still think you want to come back to Japan then I think you should. There's no reason not to try JET, but try for Interac and scour the job listings (most require current residence, but not all), and do it soon.

Would you be able to come in March, for example? A lot of schools have difficulty finding ALTs to start work then and you may well find a place willing to give you a pretty decent salary and handle getting your work visa, etc. If you are, start looking now.

Gizmotech
February 5th, 2015, 09:59
You sound like a friend of mine who was here for a year.

Great life here, moved back home with partner. Partner split up 3 months later. Friend constantly whinging about how much better life in Japan was and how they wanted to come back... until they met someone new backhome.

The real problem, their current circumstances blow, and they miss the rockstar treatment. Trust me, while life in Japan is great, the longer you're here the more that 2 year shine wears off. I'm finishing up my fourth year, and while there are great things here for me, they would only be really attractive to me if I wasn't doing anything good where I was. Most of the "friends" I met in my first two years don't talk to me anymore, which is great, because they weren't friends, they were foreigner sycophants. (That's not to say I don't have friends now, just that the quality of "friendship" is very different)

Most of my friends who have returned home only vaguely miss Japan in that "wow, it was a lot of fun those 1/2/3 years". All of those people are in some way moving on with their lives in some way or another.

Just out of curiosity, why do you have such a strong pull to the place? Why does having a Japanese community in any way matter to you? Has this fixation on the country been around for a very long time?

byakko
February 6th, 2015, 02:26
It really seems like the current situation is the problem. If where you find yourself now isn't a good place, it's natural that you would feel a strong longing for the last good place you were in.

Mothy, you cut right to it! I think at least 80% of what's going on with me is probably just this.

byakko
February 6th, 2015, 03:09
...The real problem, their current circumstances blow, and they miss the rockstar treatment. Trust me, while life in Japan is great, the longer you're here the more that 2 year shine wears off. I'm finishing up my fourth year, and while there are great things here for me, they would only be really attractive to me if I wasn't doing anything good where I was. Most of the "friends" I met in my first two years don't talk to me anymore, which is great, because they weren't friends, they were foreigner sycophants. (That's not to say I don't have friends now, just that the quality of "friendship" is very different)...

Just out of curiosity, why do you have such a strong pull to the place? Why does having a Japanese community in any way matter to you? Has this fixation on the country been around for a very long time?

Gizmotech, you're spot-on, too! This is exactly the kind of perspective that helps.

I *do* miss the rockstar treatment. Maybe it's just an extreme contrast-thing: going from a situation where work was easy and entire classrooms of children erupted in applause and excitement whenever I entered (every day, multiple times a day, for 2 years) to a work situation that is mentally exhausting and socially isolating.

It's also true that I'm one of those people that's had an inexplicable pull to Japan for a long time. I took Asian Studies and Japanese in high school, and then was an Asian Studies major in undergrad focusing on Japan and fascinated with the karyukai. I wouldn't say I'm a Japanophile; I never got weird or obsessed about it. There was just that draw. I knew that historically, the Japanese culture placed a great emphasis on harmony and balance and wanted to experience how that infuses daily life there. After trying it, I'd say they're doing great on the harmony part but have totally lost balance by becoming such workaholics. (I'm fully aware that my JET status was key in allowing me to have a relaxed, 35-hr workweek instead of the crazed 7am - 11pm madness I witnessed.)

As for the quality of friendship and community, that is one of the BIGGEST things I miss about Japan! I had friends knocking down my door to keep me involved in dinner parties, movie nights, trips to other cities, volunteering, everything. I have a tendency to be a 'lone wolf,' so this kind of community wrapping around me like a warm, caring blanket was very good for me. And I for it -- after my husband and I left, we got so many complaints about the holes we left in social and volunteering arenas.

Another thing that cannot go unmentioned is the financial situation. I've been a studious yet social girl who got straight A's, went to university, earned a bachelor's degree, earned a master's degree, (now) has 10 years of work experience (with 5-star performance reviews) at renowned institutions... But my 2 years in JET have been the ONLY two years where I felt I was paid enough to not have to pinch every penny. At every American job I've held, I've been under state- or employer-imposed salary freezes, unable to even ask for a raise. I have serious concerns about the American economy and lack of opportunity for middle-class professionals (at least, those of us who aren't in the health sector or data sciences). When a well-liked high-achiever like me is still struggling so hard at 32 years old... It just makes me wonder, is it me that's the problem? Or is it my whole country's economy? If the latter, do I need to get back out??

BifCarbet
February 6th, 2015, 03:25
When a well-liked high-achiever like me is still struggling so hard at 32 years old... It just makes me wonder, is it me that's the problem? Or is it my whole country's economy? If the latter, do I need to get back out??

It's not just you.
Also, there's nothing weak or shameful about choosing a better quality of life.
It's, of course, worth considering where you'll be after 1, 3, 5 more years on JET, though, and what options you'll have.

MikeCarter
February 6th, 2015, 11:00
One of the things I'd like to point out is that in Japan you were unique. Being unique in the job market is a very good thing. Admittedly you weren't incredibly unique (lots of people go to Asian countries to teach English), but you were rare enough to gain perks simply for being you.

Back in your home country you aren't unique. Even with all your experience and education, the job market is shitty enough that you'll be treated like everyone else. Honestly, as much as everyone says going back home and working in the "real world" is the way to go, you're far better off trying to make your way somewhere else where you have an edge. If you can find a steady job in Japan, I'd go for it and stay there, especially if you like the social aspect of it. By the sounds of it, your husband is perfectly willing to live there after he's finish his studies, so no problems there.

The economy IS bad, which is why you need to be as smart as possible with what you do and where you do it.

mothy
February 6th, 2015, 13:32
The economy isn't great here either. I think OP needs to be careful. Her last situation was great but not all placements in Japan are. There's a decent chance they'll find themselves in a situation more similar to their current situation than their past situation.

itsabird
February 9th, 2015, 15:54
.... and I liked my city and apartment.....
Stopped reading after I read this. Up yours >=[.

itsabird
February 9th, 2015, 15:56
Since I'm not fully bilingual (I'm ~NJLPT 4),
Yeap, you're right. You're definitely not that.

itsabird
February 9th, 2015, 16:07
The economy isn't great here either. I think OP needs to be careful. Her last situation was great but not all placements in Japan are. There's a decent chance they'll find themselves in a situation more similar to their current situation than their past situation.
And to finish my 3 post rant. This. Completely this. What mothy says. You'll probably get an even more isolated placement. I know plenty of people who got killer placements..... And then I know two friends who got the middle of Hokkaido, having come from tropical regions, and are very isolated as well (not as much so as me, but still pretty isolated). If you do get into JET a second time, make sure you research your placement thoroughly and don't jump at the chance just because it's Japan. Just because it is Japan, doesn't mean it's the Japan you're looking for/remember. You know, different hoes in different area codes... or however that thing goes.

Gizmotech
February 9th, 2015, 16:13
As for the quality of friendship and community, that is one of the BIGGEST things I miss about Japan! I had friends knocking down my door to keep me involved in dinner parties, movie nights, trips to other cities, volunteering, everything. I have a tendency to be a 'lone wolf,' so this kind of community wrapping around me like a warm, caring blanket was very good for me. And I for it -- after my husband and I left, we got so many complaints about the holes we left in social and volunteering arenas.

Another thing that cannot go unmentioned is the financial situation. I've been a studious yet social girl who got straight A's, went to university, earned a bachelor's degree, earned a master's degree, (now) has 10 years of work experience (with 5-star performance reviews) at renowned institutions... But my 2 years in JET have been the ONLY two years where I felt I was paid enough to not have to pinch every penny. At every American job I've held, I've been under state- or employer-imposed salary freezes, unable to even ask for a raise. I have serious concerns about the American economy and lack of opportunity for middle-class professionals (at least, those of us who aren't in the health sector or data sciences). When a well-liked high-achiever like me is still struggling so hard at 32 years old... It just makes me wonder, is it me that's the problem? Or is it my whole country's economy? If the latter, do I need to get back out??


Okay, so now that I have some time I want to weigh in again.

You were amazingly lucky to have that type of atmosphere to live in. Not everyone over here gets that kind of treatment, and it definitely depends on where you are placed. The foreigners around me are not such a massive group of friends, in fact we're quite isolated in our groups. We're even more isolated when you think that the 20 of us on one side barely ever talk to the 70 on the other side of the prefecture. Their community is entirely different, in that they are all close together in time and space, so things vary. Don't expect that warmth everywhere you go over here.

I really kinda gotta ask. How are you 32, well educated, working at "renowned" institutions and not making enough money to feel comfortable? Are you not making 36k/year? Are you doing something wrong when you look for/negotiate your work and contract? Do you have a passive/pushover personality, or is your industry dirt cheap? I just can't understand how someone who is as "on paper" well off as you are is having problems.

I'll say this, if you don't come over on JET (or even if you do it again) your situation is likely to be very different. You could end up paying 600$/month in rent, you definitely need to pay taxes this time (after 2 years, and there is no top up to cover the difference), it has gotten noticeably more expensive to live in Japan in just the last 2 years, never mind 4 since you originally came over (in my group I might add).

If you come over here feeling entitled to a life you had before, it's not going to be any different than the life you have right now.

mothy
February 9th, 2015, 16:38
That reminds me, 4 years ago OP would have been on the old pay scale. So don't expect the same pay either.

word
February 9th, 2015, 21:47
...it has gotten noticeably more expensive to live in Japan in just the last 2 years, never mind 4 since you originally came over (in my group I might add).word


That reminds me, 4 years ago OP would have been on the old pay scale. So don't expect the same pay either.word

Edit: MG and I have recontracted for the year, but we're making plans that will almost certainly mean this is gonna be the last time for us. In truth, we've both felt that we should have left earlier, because we the economy here has made our life somewhat less comfortable recently than it's been in the past... and we're both of the opinion that it's gonna get worse.

Zolrak 22
February 10th, 2015, 23:28
So is this your way of resigning from being our Lord and Saviour, Wesus?

word
February 11th, 2015, 00:24
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HCCyvAwbbso

byakko
February 14th, 2015, 22:30
I really kinda gotta ask. How are you 32, well educated, working at "renowned" institutions and not making enough money to feel comfortable? Are you not making 36k/year? Are you doing something wrong when you look for/negotiate your work and contract? Do you have a passive/pushover personality, or is your industry dirt cheap? I just can't understand how someone who is as "on paper" well off as you are is having problems.

Probably, my "industry is dirt cheap." I've been working for universities, which (across much of the U.S.) are getting their state funding slashed while simultaneously being mandated to lower tuition rates. So it's employee pay that gets squeezed to compensate. (The university I work for now just won an award for being the most "efficient" in the entire Southeast region, meaning they expend less money per student than any other (subtext: by paying their employees the least).)

As a programs administrator, I am making 42K/year, but -- to my bewilderment and frustration -- it's not enough to support me and my student-husband, even though he works part-time and we basically don't do anything but work and study. (No shopping, drinking, movies or vacations.) Our rent is reasonable ($750), but groceries are getting more and more expensive here (just like in Japan). 45K/year is probably the minimum I need to cover our basics; 55K/year is my target range.

I'm open to breaking into the private sector, but I need help. With a BA in Asian Studies and an MA in Liberal Studies (and university-based work experience), I'm not sure where to search, what kinds of positions to look for or how seriously I'd be considered. My strengths are in writing, rhetoric, diplomacy and organization; my work experience is in office management, event management, program management, education, student services, and advising. If you were me, what would you do? Where do you think I'd fit in today's work marketplace?


Also, I want to thank you guys for your thoughtful and relevant responses. I had no idea I'd get such on-point advice and non-judgmental consideration. You rock. :)

MikeCarter
February 15th, 2015, 00:43
For reference, the same thing is happening here in Canada to universities.

privileged
February 15th, 2015, 06:00
It’s tough. I logged in here because I’m also missing Japan.

I was in Tokyo for over 6 years; I’ve been back in the States for 4.

Life in Japan was always interesting. You are ALWAYS learning something new. You’re in a very nice society that you’re a part of, yet apart from. I had a nice group of foreign friends, as well as Japanese. There was something fun about figuring out how to do stuff. How to file my taxes. How to get around, how to find work, how to date. It’s all an adventure! Here’s it’s just a pain in the ass.

I was gone from late 20’s to early 30’s, when my friends who chose a normal life were developing things like careers, marriages, houses, and children. I am just not on that level.

I definitely miss Japan and I sort of want to be back there, but not realistically. I appreciated the opportunity to teach but I don’t want to do it as a career. I also don’t want to work twice the hours at a Japanese company for about the same pay.

Moving to Japan is one of the best things I’ve done and it’s also a bit of a curse as I think you’ll always miss it. And to be fair, I view my memories through rose-colored glasses. I missed America when I was in Japan.

I’m not really looking for advice or for this to be “solved.” Just saying I can relate. When I first got there, of course I didn’t know anyone or how to do anything. I had lots of free time. It doesn’t take that long for life to take over and you wind up very busy. I guess it’s odd that it’s taking longer back in the States. Part of it is probably that I’m older. Also, I don’t live in a city nearly as dense or convenient as Tokyo. I’m struggling with work, which means while I have lots of free time, I don’t have much disposable income. I’ve done all the cooking, jogging, and cleaning I can handle. Eventually you need to do stuff that requires money in order to develop a normal social life.

It’s fair enough people aren’t going to hire me and pay me well for having pretty much fucked around in Japan instead of developing plausible career skills. I made the choice and I stand by it. Still, I thought coming back would be tough, and it has been.

BifCarbet
February 15th, 2015, 12:25
It’s all an adventure!

Agreed. I lived in Tokyo for a year and a half, and in a small, rural city for three years. After all that time, I still get a kick out of just walking down the street.
In the end, wouldn't it be really cool to say you made it through life enjoying stuff?

mothy
February 15th, 2015, 15:38
Are people from such terrible places that they had to go to Japan to do that?

Zolrak 22
February 15th, 2015, 15:56
Are people from such terrible places that they had to go to Japan to do that?
Coming from you, that has to hurt.

BifCarbet
February 15th, 2015, 17:49
No. It's just too hot to go outside here.

gibbity
February 17th, 2015, 04:49
Coming from you, that has to hurt.

Hot damn this just hit such a good spot. Thanks for the good and genuine laugh.

Sherlock
February 23rd, 2015, 06:46
To the original poster. It sounds like you are having a tough time. I agree with others that you are probably missing Japan because of how unhappy you are with your current situation.

To me it seems clear that the reason why you are struggling to pay your bills is your student husband. Your 42k salary is decent when you are not factoring in a spouse who is only working part time and enrolled in an undergrad program. College is expensive. I don't think there is much you can do but look for a better paying job to pay the bills until he graduates and starts bringing in good money.

If you want to make better money and are as qualified as you sound I recommend trying to work for the federal government. The money is great though I sincerly doubht you will find it as fufilling as JET. the feds are always looking for program managers and the like throughout the country. Working for the federal gov also gives you a large chance for promotion and job advancement. I come from a family of fed employees and find most people don't have a clue to the vast amount of well paying fed gov jobs are out there.

word
February 25th, 2015, 14:45
If you want to make better money and are as qualified as you sound I recommend trying to work for the federal government. The money is great though I sincerly doubht you will find it as fufilling as JET. the feds are always looking for program managers and the like throughout the country. Working for the federal gov also gives you a large chance for promotion and job advancement. I come from a family of fed employees and find most people don't have a clue to the vast amount of well paying fed gov jobs are out there.http://cdn01.dailycaller.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/ron-swanson-work.jpg

Zolrak 22
February 25th, 2015, 16:02
http://cdn01.dailycaller.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/ron-swanson-work.jpg
Too true.

Cbill1
February 25th, 2015, 21:51
Let's be fair, the same sentiment could also be applied to JET.

word
February 25th, 2015, 22:07
Of course. JET is a government job.

Cbill1
February 25th, 2015, 22:23
Of course. JET is a government job.

Indeed it is.

For real though, in response to the original poster (if it's still relevant), I think it would be worth taking a good look at what's making you miserable now and thinking if there's anything you can do in the near future to help fix your situation. You mentioned that you didn't have very many friends where you were; maybe you could take place in a meetup group or join a local club? Making friends when you're older isn't easy but it is doable, I think.

One of the great things about JET is that in a lot of places the friend groups are built in; there are only six foreigners in the city, so of course who else are you going to hang out with? It's good for falling into a central group but, if you do decide to go back to Japan, I think it's important to remember that this situation isn't a given. You could be in a situation where the other foreigners in town are people who you won't mesh with at all, or you might even be the only foreigner in the village! Of course, it would still be possible to create a strong social network in a situation like that too, but it would take considerable more effort, and what you would be doing is probably very similar to what you would do to make friends in your current situation.

I'm not necessarily saying tough it out if it's truly making you miserable, but I am saying that it's worth thinking about what you can do to make your situation better. Numerous other posters have said it, but what you aren't missing isn't Japan itself, but your experience there. See if you can isolate what it was that made your experience in Japan so enjoyable, and do your best to create it where you are. Remember, ESID so it's very unlikely you'll get the same experience in Japan through JET, but you might be able to create something similar where you are.

Sherlock
February 26th, 2015, 02:54
http://cdn01.dailycaller.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/ron-swanson-work.jpg


This is very true.

The federal government definitely overpays many of its employees for the type of work they do. Which was why I was recommending it to the original poster so that she can be more financially sound doing similar work for better pay.

webstaa
February 26th, 2015, 08:27
Of course. JET is a government job.

Even better, it's contract work for the government. (I feel that way any time a teacher walks up to me and asks me repeatedly, 'Is it OK to bother you right now? Can you come to class next period?' - "Of course. Standing around in a class doing nothing is a better use of my time than sitting in the staff room fucking around on ITIL."

mothy
February 26th, 2015, 08:41
Even better, it's contract work for the government. (I feel that way any time a teacher walks up to me and asks me repeatedly, 'Is it OK to bother you right now? Can you come to class next period?' - "Of course. Standing around in a class doing nothing is a better use of my time than sitting in the staff room fucking around on ITIL."

The first school I worked at was real bad about this. They used me less in the classroom than any other ALT I've ever met was used, but nevertheless whenever a teacher asked me to do anything they'd be groveling and apologizing and saying how busy I was, even though I was constantly begging them to use me more.

uthinkimlost?
February 26th, 2015, 08:46
Was the previous ALT an asshole?

mothy
February 26th, 2015, 09:46
No, but they didn't have him do much either. It just seemed to be the school philosophy that TT classes were a waste of time.
Can't say I completely disagree with them, but it made it a pain to work there.

Jiggit
February 26th, 2015, 09:49
It just seemed to be the school philosophy that TT classes were a waste of time.

See, I'm not saying this attitude is wrong, but I don't see how they think that differentiates TT classes from their regular classes.

webstaa
February 26th, 2015, 10:42
See, I'm not saying this attitude is wrong, but I don't see how they think that differentiates TT classes from their regular classes.

It depends on how they approach the ALT - is he a living tape recorder? Does he stand in the corner by himself? Does he lead classes? Does he explain grammar/help students directly? Does he make his own materials, laminate them and organize lessons plans or does he just tack on an internet worksheet and call it a day?

I caused some problems when I told my JTEs that I wanted to start introducing the kids to concept mapping for the reading assignments. And save 20 minutes of going through each sentence and explaining every connection and meaning in Japanese. So maybe they could use the English they've learned. But that was 'chottoed' off the lesson plan. (And there's one of the reasons my ES classes have already been done with the textbook for 2 weeks, while none of the JHS classes will finish their entire textbook.)

Ini
March 4th, 2015, 08:14
mapping at ES? Theres only about 4 sentences in the entire book

webstaa
March 4th, 2015, 08:31
mapping at ES? Theres only about 4 sentences in the entire book


They even make illustrated guides for using HF, complete with explanations explaining the explanations already in the teachers text for HF. All part of 'English Education Research.' Mostly its explaining why the textbook accounts for 20% of the lesson. Unless you're taking things REALLY slowly, there isn't 35 hours of content in HF.

12ish sentences in HF 1, 15ish in HF 2.

Ini
March 4th, 2015, 08:34
theres like 6 sentences in HF2....

Ini
March 4th, 2015, 08:35
Do you OO, When is OO, Can you OO, Where is OO, I want to OO, What time OO........

Jiggit
March 4th, 2015, 08:43
Do you OO, When is OO, Can you OO, Where is OO, I want to OO, What time OO........

Carry On ALTing?

Ini
March 4th, 2015, 08:47
http://www.thesaltybox.com/forum/attachments/help-advice/120500d1414760653-hammers-night-ooh-matron-kenneth-williams-carry-bouvier-des-flandres-puppies-sale-uk.jpg

webstaa
March 5th, 2015, 08:20
Do you OO, When is OO, Can you OO, Where is OO, I want to OO, What time OO........

Do you have OO?
Yes, I do. No, I don't.
When is OO?
OO is (date.)
I can/can't OO.
Can you OO?
Yes, I can. No, I can't.
Where is OO?
Go straight.
Turn right/left.
I want to (go to) OO.
Where do you want (to go)?
Let's go.
I get up at OO.
What time OOO?
We are good friends.
We are strong and brave.
I want to be a OO.
What do you want to be?

Ini
March 5th, 2015, 08:24
we are good friends, we are strong and brave - who actually uses those sentences? that whole section of the book is garbage

as for the others they should have learned in 5th grade how to answer questions, yes i do/do i dont. yes i can/do i cant doesn't really count as new content........

webstaa
March 5th, 2015, 08:44
that whole section of the book is garbage

as for the others they should have learned in 5th grade how to answer questions, yes i do/do i dont. yes i can/do i cant doesn't really count as new content........

Pretty much. There's a reason that a lot of municipalities are looking for supplementary materials to raise the 5th/6th year English so the first 4 months of JHS aren't spent rehashing the same stuff (plus writing.) (It's only personal opinion, but I think ES students should be doing basic writing in at least 6th year - they learn romaji in 3rd year? No reason to hold off on it if they've already studied it 3 years prior...)

coop52
March 6th, 2015, 10:06
They learn romaji, but it's the stupid one with si and tu instead of shi and tsu. They only learn to write in capital letters, too. But, I agree that they're capable of handling lower case in ES.

Gizmotech
March 6th, 2015, 14:22
They learn romaji, but it's the stupid one with si and tu instead of shi and tsu. They only learn to write in capital letters, too. But, I agree that they're capable of handling lower case in ES.

Hey, nothing wrong with writing in all capital letters :P