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dbw146
February 8th, 2015, 02:02
Hi all,

So here's a predicament which I'm unsure of how it may affect my JET application.

I just recently got out of an abusive relationship and found out from my doctor that I contracted Chlamydia. Easily curable, yada yada, but I'm concerned as to how this might affect my position as a prospective JET. Are there be necessary steps to let them know about my change in medical history? Many thanks.

squirrelmagnolia
February 8th, 2015, 06:01
I don't think this is something they need or want to know, lol. one round of antibiotics and its all in the past. they really only need to know about things that are going to affect you living in Japan.

miamicoordinator
February 8th, 2015, 07:18
Hi all,

So here's a predicament which I'm unsure of how it may affect my JET application.

I just recently got out of an abusive relationship and found out from my doctor that I contracted Chlamydia. Easily curable, yada yada, but I'm concerned as to how this might affect my position as a prospective JET. Are there be necessary steps to let them know about my change in medical history? Many thanks.


If you wish to inform your coordinator, just send them an email and explain the situation. These kinds of things happen all the time, and its not a big deal.

Remember that if you are shortlisted, you will be required to get a certificate lf health.

Best of luck,

Zolrak 22
February 8th, 2015, 07:38
I'd tell them, but I don't know how good it would look to be honest.

On one hand, it's good that you are letting them know, on another, you are implying a lot about your social life with the statement. [emoji53]

dbw146
February 8th, 2015, 10:05
Wouldn't a background check upon being shortlisted show that I've been diagnosed and treated? I would think it best to let them know then, unless medical concerns after the interview process don't count for anything.

Also my social life is of no one's concern but my own. These things happen and I don't think this forum is a place for shaming.

patjs
February 8th, 2015, 10:09
I'd tell them, but I don't know how good it would look to be honest.

On one hand, it's good that you are letting them know, on another, you are implying a lot about your social life with the statement. [emoji53]

This is a really shitty statement. Shaming someone for contracting an STD? Nice move bro.

Zolrak 22
February 8th, 2015, 10:15
Hey, they've already stated it was because of someone else's fault.

But you can't really say that to an employer, so they'll most likely assume the worse. [emoji53]

Not trying to shame anyone (As I can't speak for their life), it's just logical.

Especially when dealing with a conservative government in regards to a teaching position.

Gunjumero
February 8th, 2015, 10:18
This is a really shitty statement. Shaming someone for contracting an STD? Nice move bro.

I thought he was trying to say that maybe someone could quick to judge and (wrongly ) assume that: having an STD = someone who *** (can I say the F word on ITIL ) arounds and can therefore not be trusted. I don't agree to that but can someone somewhere think that way , maybe.


Now a more informed adult would know that it is entirely plausible that your partner maybe didn't know he/she had it or could have simply lied to you about it.

Zolrak 22
February 8th, 2015, 10:23
I thought he was trying to say that maybe someone could quick to judge and (wrongly ) assume that: having an STD = someone who *** (can I say the F word on ITIL ) arounds and can therefore not be trusted.

Word.

If I was trying to shame someone, it wouldn't be while they are asking for help. Who'd do that? [emoji28]

miamicoordinator
February 8th, 2015, 10:38
Wouldn't a background check upon being shortlisted show that I've been diagnosed and treated? I would think it best to let them know then, unless medical concerns after the interview process don't count for anything.

Also my social life is of no one's concern but my own. These things happen and I don't think this forum is a place for shaming.

The fbi check is 100% criminal. Medical history does not show up on it. The only place it might show up is when you go in for your certificate of health check up (Depending on your doctor)

mothy
February 8th, 2015, 12:11
These things happen and I don't think this forum is a place for shaming.

Unless they're fat. Then let the shaming commence.

Zolrak 22
February 8th, 2015, 12:23
Unless they're fat. Then let the shaming commence.
http://stream1.gifsoup.com/view6/4685499/that-s-my-secret-captain-o.gif

That's our secret Moth, we are always shaming.

squirrelmagnolia
February 8th, 2015, 23:43
Seriously though, why would you call them and tell them about this? if you got the flu would you tell them? strep throat? after a week its all going to be history. I think you have to draw the line somewhere for the sake of privacy/dignity.

miamicoordinator
February 9th, 2015, 00:54
Seriously though, why would you call them and tell them about this? if you got the flu would you tell them? strep throat? after a week its all going to be history. I think you have to draw the line somewhere for the sake of privacy/dignity.

I understand the point of view that certain things should be none of your employer and future employers business., and i agree with the sentiment 100%.

However, we are talking about the japanese government which asks all applicants to disclose all medications and conditions on the self assment medical form.

The main worry is lack of disclosure. if a person fails to mention a past medical condition(no matter how trivial.it may seem) on their application, and it comes up in the full health screening required for the certificate of health, then the applicant runs the risk of being disqualified. The disqualification would not be because of the condition, but rather because the applicant tried to hide it.

Privacy is a luxury when working for the japanese government unfortunately.

BifCarbet
February 9th, 2015, 02:03
I understand the point of view that certain things should be none of your employer and future employers business., and i agree with the sentiment 100%.

However, we are talking about the japanese government which asks all applicants to disclose all medications and conditions on the self assment medical form.

The main worry is lack of disclosure. if a person fails to mention a past medical condition(no matter how trivial.it may seem) on their application, and it comes up in the full health screening required for the certificate of health, then the applicant runs the risk of being disqualified. The disqualification would not be because of the condition, but rather because the applicant tried to hide it.

Privacy is a luxury when working for the japanese government unfortunately.

This is technically true, but a line has to be drawn. If you catch a cold or sprain your ankle, do you tell them? This particular affliction is not a big deal, in my opinion. A more dire situation (herpes or HIV, for example) would require disclosure, but this is basically as serious as a cold. Can you really disclose EVERYTHING?

Gunjumero
February 9th, 2015, 02:18
This is technically true, but a line has to be drawn. If you catch a cold or sprain your ankle, do you tell them? This particular affliction is not a big deal, in my opinion. A more dire situation (herpes or HIV, for example) would require disclosure, but this is basically as serious as a cold. Can you really disclose EVERYTHING?

I thought if you had to go a physician or receive a prescription for it it had to be disclosed.

That was how (I think) the line was drawn.

miamicoordinator
February 9th, 2015, 02:30
I thought if you had to go a physician or receive a prescription for it it had to be disclosed.

That was how (I think) the line was drawn.

That is correct.

BifCarbet
February 9th, 2015, 03:00
:023:

EDIT: By the way, miamicoordinator, I was actually asking you, not trying to prove a point with rhetorical questions. I basically got my answer, but I was wondering if there were more specific guidelines of what they are expecting to be disclosed and what they aren't. Doctor visit and prescription makes sense. Gracias.

SailorZorro
February 9th, 2015, 04:13
So, according to those guidelines: get a cold during this time of the year and no medication needed, no need to report anything. But get a sinus infection,very similar sickness level but medication needed since its an infection and you have to report it. Even if your doctor just calls the rx in?
I'm asking because I almost never get colds, but a sinus infection is common as I reported on my medical forms. I want to know if I might need to report anything.

miamicoordinator
February 9th, 2015, 04:26
:023:

EDIT: By the way, miamicoordinator, I was actually asking you, not trying to prove a point with rhetorical questions. I basically got my answer, but I was wondering if there were more specific guidelines of what they are expecting to be disclosed and what they aren't. Doctor visit and prescription makes sense. Gracias.

Yep, thats what i figured.
medical things are always a cause of much confusion every year because there are so many things that could go wrong, and of course there huge difference between medical privacy in the U.S. compared to japan. Unfortunately even specific guidelines from tokyo can be Too vague for comfort.

miamicoordinator
February 9th, 2015, 04:30
So, according to those guidelines: get a cold during this time of the year and no medication needed, no need to report anything. But get a sinus infection,very similar sickness level but medication needed since its an infection and you have to report it. Even if your doctor just calls the rx in?
I'm asking because I almost never get colds, but a sinus infection is common as I reported on my medical forms. I want to know if I might need to report anything.

The way the guidelines lay it out, any prescription medicine that you need to take should be reported.

The main issue is that there are many medications in the u.s. that are common, but are illegal in japan. What may seem like a common medicine here may be impossible to get in japan, like sudafed for example.

Zolrak 22
February 9th, 2015, 04:31
medical things are always a cause of much confusion every year because there are so many things that could go wrong, and of course there huge difference between medical privacy in the U.S. compared to Japan. Unfortunately even specific guidelines from tokyo can be Too vague for comfort.

Japanese + vague = match made in "heaven". Especially bureaucracy. [emoji6]

Right? [emoji14]

miamicoordinator
February 9th, 2015, 04:43
Japanese + vague = match made in "heaven". Especially bureaucracy. [emoji6]

Right? [emoji14]

Ay zolcito, you have no idea! Especially in the government. Drives me nuts sometimes.