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Rmtcts
April 2nd, 2015, 20:23
So now that people have started hearing the bad news, what are people planning on doing?


I'm torn at the moment, I want to dive fulheartedly into preparing for applyin for the next cycle, but not sure if it's the right thing to do. The reason why I picked JET was because I would be bringing my Wife over, and with no guarantee of her being able to get a job, the extra money would have been appreciated. But now perhaps it would be better to work a year and save up more money while applying to alternatives such as interac?
There's also the question on wether it's worth spending what will be around 2 years of my life sinking time and money into applying for a job that I only want to spend a year at anyway.
I'd appreciate thoughts and opinions from others with similar experiences.

lewis90
April 2nd, 2015, 20:54
I'm going to take the year to save up and apply again next year. Interac seems a good alternative but the money looks to me like it has a big impact. They offer lower wages, no house subsidies and you have to pay for the flight. Not to mention the half pay or whatever you get over holidays. Might want to ask some actual Interacers though, I'm just speculating at the money troubles

I think the main thing is making it not be a wasted year but actually make something out of it

Halebob
April 2nd, 2015, 20:55
Hey. Firstly, I couldn't stop crying. Now that's coming sporadically. But the anger is coming now.
I'm in a similar position to as I was taking my husband with me.
I won't be waiting to apply again. I graduated last year and CANNOT wait another year to go through it all again, for something with no guarantees. I did apply to Interac back end of last year but decided not to interview as they pay less and, you have reduced income during holiday periods. Not enough for 2 of us to live off.
I also applied to another company (I think it was Saxoncourt) and they wouldn't even entertain me cause I had a dependent (even though we could sort the visa out ourselves), then proceeded to try and put us off Japan in a not so nice way.
Not a clue what to do now. Going to look at other jobs but they just don't pay as well and/or have problems with dependents (AEON say on their website that their accommodation is single occupancy only and you have to take their accommodation.

Rmtcts
April 2nd, 2015, 21:03
Thanks for the information about dependants with other companies,I hadn't even started looking at that stuff yet. Looks like JET is definitely the best way to do it, just wether I can deal with waiting the year and disrupting my life a bit more. :/

Halebob
April 2nd, 2015, 21:12
That's why we decided to stick around and apply for JET. It's the best option if you have dependents. I'm curious to know if anyone actually got shortlisted with dependents???

miamicoordinator
April 2nd, 2015, 21:42
That's why we decided to stick around and apply for JET. It's the best option if you have dependents. I'm curious to know if anyone actually got shortlisted with dependents???

I shortlisted a great applicant who is being accompanied by his wife and 2 kids. I am sure there are others from different consulates as well.

harvetron
April 2nd, 2015, 22:02
I'm going to be looking at INTERAC, AEON, ECC, and possibly some other East Asian countries such as Vietnam or South Korea. I graduate in July, and I'm dead set on getting out of the UK this summer as I can't stand to live here anymore! I need to get out and see some of the world. So yeah, this is the end of pursuing the JET dream, it was a path that unfortunately led to a dead end, so it's time to try out the others.

Halebob
April 2nd, 2015, 22:11
Check out a website called Glassdoor. It has reviews of lots of companies and, if I remember rightly, ECC didn't fare very well.

Edit - I just checked glassdoor and ECC has 4/5. Must be a different company I looked at. But good website.

Kyle
April 2nd, 2015, 22:14
That's why we decided to stick around and apply for JET. It's the best option if you have dependents. I'm curious to know if anyone actually got shortlisted with dependents???

I got shortlisted and my wife will go with me. She is Japanese though which i guess is much easier. If we live in a very rural area she might not work though.

weepinbell
April 2nd, 2015, 22:32
Sorry to hear this guys. ECC was my backup - I interviewed/was hired on and they had a lot of accomodation options. My little experience with them was very good and I know someone who is working for them now who absolutely loves it. I believe you can also opt to find your own accomodation, and I want to say they were pretty open to dependents. Good luck!

Halebob
April 2nd, 2015, 22:33
Sorry to hear this guys. ECC was my backup - I interviewed/was hired on and they had a lot of accomodation options. My little experience with them was very good and I know someone who is working for them now who absolutely loves it. I believe you can also opt to find your own accomodation, and I want to say they were pretty open to dependents. Good luck!

That's good to know. Thanks.

uthinkimlost?
April 2nd, 2015, 23:08
I'm going to take the year to save up and apply again next year. Interac seems a good alternative but the money looks to me like it has a big impact. They offer lower wages, no house subsidies and you have to pay for the flight. Not to mention the half pay or whatever you get over holidays. Might want to ask some actual Interacers though, I'm just speculating at the money troubles

I think the main thing is making it not be a wasted year but actually make something out of it

The wages aren't far off anymore. Not all JETs get a housing subsidy. Those interac employees may not get paid on breaks, but they don't work in that time either.

ambrosse
April 2nd, 2015, 23:41
I'm going to be looking at INTERAC, AEON, ECC, and possibly some other East Asian countries such as Vietnam or South Korea. I graduate in July, and I'm dead set on getting out of the UK this summer as I can't stand to live here anymore! I need to get out and see some of the world. So yeah, this is the end of pursuing the JET dream, it was a path that unfortunately led to a dead end, so it's time to try out the others.

I have a friend who just started with AEON last November. She likes the work-style better than when she was an ALT on JET (you're the sole teacher for your classes and the age groups vary significantly), but the hours are kind of crappy if you like to go out and do things a ton, and their contracted LeoPalace apartments are tiny boxes.
I call my friend's apartment "Final Hallway."
Either way she's enjoying her time. If it's just you (no dependents), check out AEON.

harvetron
April 3rd, 2015, 01:58
Cheers buddy. Yeah it's just me, I'll do a lot of research on the other organisations and hopefully I'll get further. Thanks again for a bit of insight!

MikeCarter
April 3rd, 2015, 04:03
Guess this is a good place to vent.

Well, I didn't get in. Just flat out rejected. I don't know what's worse, the fact that I can't figure out why, or the fact that this is so in-line with my normal luck that I wasn't even surprised. I'm just confused. Confused as to what I lack that everyone else apparently has. Confused as to what I could have done differently.

It's an awful feeling. It gets even worse when I start thinking about it more. The odds were so stacked in favour of being accepted. After the interview you have like a 50/50 chance, odds that are rumoured to be even better because of recent changes in Japan. And I still didn't get in.

I don't see how I could have improved on my application. My interview was by no means perfect, but no ones ever is, and the whole time I was smiling and got them to laugh. The only things I can see that would hold me back is my lack of a full licence and maybe the TEFLO thing, but if that was the case I shouldn't have even made it to the interview stage.

In fact, I could handle the rejection easier if I didn't get to the interview stage. At least then you can assure yourself that it's not you, it's just some sort of qualification that you lack. But nope. It's me. I went to the interview, they saw me, spoke with me, and determine that I'm not fit to go. Not even a maybe. They're so sure that I'm not a good fit, that I landed in the bottom like, 25% of interviewees. The same group of people who went there unprepared, or missed documents, or we're clearly unfit to go.

Yep, we all suck. We're all that bad. Not that we weren't good enough to make it, but that we were so bad they flat out refused to give us the chance.

And then I see everyone else getting accepted. I can understand you're happy, but it's so soul-crushing to see people god "OMG I got in! I thought I did so terrible". To see everyone else progressing and having good things happen to them, and to just sit here and be like "great, good for you".

But, like I said, that's just my luck it seems. I wanted to believe I'd make it, and a part of me really did think I had a chance, but another part in the back of head knew it was just a pipedream. Just something to grab at and inevitably fall short of. This was the test to see if I could actually do something, to see if I could accomplish something I really wanted to achieve.

And I failed. Just as expected.

Halebob
April 3rd, 2015, 04:29
You hit the nail on the head, Mike. It's exactly how I feel.

abscondita
April 3rd, 2015, 05:21
Guess this is a good place to vent.

Well, I didn't get in. Just flat out rejected. I don't know what's worse, the fact that I can't figure out why, or the fact that this is so in-line with my normal luck that I wasn't even surprised. I'm just confused. Confused as to what I lack that everyone else apparently has. Confused as to what I could have done differently.

It's an awful feeling. It gets even worse when I start thinking about it more. The odds were so stacked in favour of being accepted. After the interview you have like a 50/50 chance, odds that are rumoured to be even better because of recent changes in Japan. And I still didn't get in.

I don't see how I could have improved on my application. My interview was by no means perfect, but no ones ever is, and the whole time I was smiling and got them to laugh. The only things I can see that would hold me back is my lack of a full licence and maybe the TEFLO thing, but if that was the case I shouldn't have even made it to the interview stage.

In fact, I could handle the rejection easier if I didn't get to the interview stage. At least then you can assure yourself that it's not you, it's just some sort of qualification that you lack. But nope. It's me. I went to the interview, they saw me, spoke with me, and determine that I'm not fit to go. Not even a maybe. They're so sure that I'm not a good fit, that I landed in the bottom like, 25% of interviewees. The same group of people who went there unprepared, or missed documents, or we're clearly unfit to go.

Yep, we all suck. We're all that bad. Not that we weren't good enough to make it, but that we were so bad they flat out refused to give us the chance.

And then I see everyone else getting accepted. I can understand you're happy, but it's so soul-crushing to see people god "OMG I got in! I thought I did so terrible". To see everyone else progressing and having good things happen to them, and to just sit here and be like "great, good for you".

But, like I said, that's just my luck it seems. I wanted to believe I'd make it, and a part of me really did think I had a chance, but another part in the back of head knew it was just a pipedream. Just something to grab at and inevitably fall short of. This was the test to see if I could actually do something, to see if I could accomplish something I really wanted to achieve.

And I failed. Just as expected.


Agreed Mike, though in the end I don't think it just comes down to luck...

I can see where I failed in the interview, though in a way it shows that I am not suitable for the JET Programme.

I was asked:

-"You already have a TEFL, why JET? Why don't you just go and find some job independently? And I struggled in all honesty. I have found and could find something else quite easily without relying on the comfort of the government programme. JET in a way is too inflexible for me in that I can't choose the destination and the contract states a year (so I can't just decide to move on if I dislike my situation after a few months). My honest answer to this would have been "well, because you are paying for my flight tickets", but I thought this wouldn't really be the desired answer, so opted for the vague "I like the support JET offers".

-"You say you like travelling. With JET you would have to stay at the school most weekends. Would this bother you?" I said "No" but secretly thought yes. I bet my faced revealed the truth.

In addition, I was quite nervous (like many applicants) and stumbled on the first few questions and gave some silly answers.


When it boils down to it, my heart was not really in this. I applied because I love the Japanese language, but having visited Japan I was wary of returning as a resident. I have applied for other jobs in Asian countries with which I feel more affinity and my gut feeling was telling me to choose these alternatives. Upon hearing I was rejected I was in a strange way relieved. Sure, I would have liked to have been accepted so I could reject the offer myself to massage my own ego, but in the end all is well.

I am sure many rejects would have made good, if not better teachers than many of those who have been accepted. Interviews can be deceptive, fantastic candidates can be reduced to stammering idiots due to anxiety/a bad day and good actors can squeeze through the rings of fire untarnished. Don't give up hope, JET rejects. JET is not your only gateway to Japan, nor are the other competetive agencies. Get a TEFL, head out there and find your own way. Choose your location, your hours, your school.

There may be something as exciting, if not more exciting waiting for you all around the corner ;)

nostos
April 3rd, 2015, 06:02
-"You say you like travelling. With JET you would have to stay at the school most weekends. Would this bother you?" I said "No" but secretly thought yes. I bet my faced revealed the truth.


I guess this is another ESID thing? Because I am almost never at school on the weekends (like, maybe 4 times a year, if that) and I know that tons of other JETs in my prefecture are constantly going places on weekends/holidays/long weekends. Seriously, I have so much free time to travel its ridiculous.

patjs
April 3rd, 2015, 06:31
I guess this is another ESID thing? Because I am almost never at school on the weekends (like, maybe 4 times a year, if that) and I know that tons of other JETs in my prefecture are constantly going places on weekends/holidays/long weekends. Seriously, I have so much free time to travel its ridiculous.

It's not ESID- very few ALTs have to be at school on the weekend. That's a bizarre question for the interviewer to ask.

Ananasboat
April 3rd, 2015, 07:56
It's an awful feeling. It gets even worse when I start thinking about it more. The odds were so stacked in favour of being accepted. After the interview you have like a 50/50 chance, odds that are rumoured to be even better because of recent changes in Japan. And I still didn't get in.

I don't see how I could have improved on my application. My interview was by no means perfect, but no ones ever is, and the whole time I was smiling and got them to laugh. The only things I can see that would hold me back is my lack of a full licence and maybe the TEFLO thing, but if that was the case I shouldn't have even made it to the interview stage.

In fact, I could handle the rejection easier if I didn't get to the interview stage. At least then you can assure yourself that it's not you, it's just some sort of qualification that you lack. But nope. It's me. I went to the interview, they saw me, spoke with me, and determine that I'm not fit to go. Not even a maybe. They're so sure that I'm not a good fit, that I landed in the bottom like, 25% of interviewees. The same group of people who went there unprepared, or missed documents, or we're clearly unfit to go.



I just want to make something clear. It's not the people who interview you who accept or reject you. They have a sheet that they fill out (I'm assuming) and they send it over to Japan for review, which is why it takes so f-ing long. You could have had a perfect interview, but if the people on the Japan side saw something that they didn't think meshed with their style very easily they might have rejected you. It may seem like a magic hat trick, where they just pull shortlisters out of this air, but there is a process.

uthinkimlost?
April 3rd, 2015, 08:25
Guys. JET is a job. Nothing more. You've all built it into a grand construct, a Valhalla that exists for the worthy. Some of these posts reek of desperation, and I'm sure that was obvious in the interview. This is a job where you work with children and teach, if you're lucky. It is not a way to get your spouse to the country with you, and it's not simply a means of getting to the Land of the Rising Sun. It is a job, and if you've been rejected... well, it happens. There are other jobs, and even other jobs in Japan.

webstaa
April 3rd, 2015, 08:50
It's not ESID- very few ALTs have to be at school on the weekend. That's a bizarre question for the interviewer to ask.

Only time I'm at school on the weekends is for school events - PTA class visit day, sports day and tournaments, graduation etc. Maybe 5 weekends a year. But you get a day off in turn within 3 weeks or something like that (it's in the contract.)

Ananasboat
April 3rd, 2015, 08:50
Guys. JET is a job. Nothing more. You've all built it into a grand construct, a Valhalla that exists for the worthy. Some of these posts reek of desperation, and I'm sure that was obvious in the interview. This is a job where you work with children and teach, if you're lucky. It is not a way to get your spouse to the country with you, and it's not simply a means of getting to the Land of the Rising Sun. It is a job, and if you've been rejected... well, it happens. There are other jobs, and even other jobs in Japan.

Word.

THE
April 3rd, 2015, 09:01
This is why you got rejected.

5119

Getting rejected sucks, especially for the marathon application process that the JET Program puts people through. For what it's worth, guys, there are an incredible number of people applying, and JET doesn't hire applicants: Schools in Japan with varying preferences and desires hire applicants.

So at the end of the day, someone at these schools, someone who has never met you, has a bunch of data and some headshots to sort through. God knows how anybody makes any decisions regarding who makes it and who doesn't. Some of the guys who do make it over suggest a lack of rigorous scrutiny in the screening process.

In other words, this is a case where your rejection doesn't have to do with your abilities or qualifications, but pure freaking luck. Getting rejected by JET doesn't mean you suck.

THE
April 3rd, 2015, 09:03
It may seem like a magic hat trick, where they just pull shortlisters out of this air, but there is a process.

Do you know what this process is?

Ananasboat
April 3rd, 2015, 09:05
Do you know what this process is?

Instead of a hat they use a dart board.

MikeCarter
April 3rd, 2015, 09:08
Guys. JET is a job. Nothing more. You've all built it into a grand construct, a Valhalla that exists for the worthy. Some of these posts reek of desperation, and I'm sure that was obvious in the interview. This is a job where you work with children and teach, if you're lucky. It is not a way to get your spouse to the country with you, and it's not simply a means of getting to the Land of the Rising Sun. It is a job, and if you've been rejected... well, it happens. There are other jobs, and even other jobs in Japan.

You're misunderstanding the source of my dismay. JET is a long process, but your odds of getting in are actually very good compared to almost any other job, and yet I still didn't make it. I don't have any delusions about Japan being this amazing place or that this is a dream job, I'm just pissed that apparently I didn't even meet their illusive minimum standard.


I just want to make something clear. It's not the people who interview you who accept or reject you. They have a sheet that they fill out (I'm assuming) and they send it over to Japan for review, which is why it takes so f-ing long. You could have had a perfect interview, but if the people on the Japan side saw something that they didn't think meshed with their style very easily they might have rejected you. It may seem like a magic hat trick, where they just pull shortlisters out of this air, but there is a process.

This makes me regret being honest with my health on my application. I could see how me taking bi-weekly injections could be considered too big a hassle for them.

Or it could be irrelevant. Really wish you at least got a hint as to how to improve.

Oh well, time to move on.

Virgil
April 3rd, 2015, 09:10
Some of these posts reek of desperation, and I'm sure that was obvious in the interview.

Word. word. WORD. I've already mentioned it in another thread - Some people saying that they were rejected are instantly making excuses, and rationalizing things. This is a human response, but hiring committees generally don't like it. Also, if you're not able to pinpoint your weaknesses .... that is probably one of them. Like THE said, getting turned down for a job says very little about you. How you handle that rejection says a lot. Own up to the fact that there are things you can improve about yourself, and how you sell yourself. You can also recognize that much of it is a dice roll.

As soon as the excuses start flying and the self-berating begins, I can maybe see why you didn't make it in.

I was an alternate. And I know why. My interview was BAD. I gave such shallow answers. I answered all questions in a very plain short manner. Maybe the only reason I actually got alternate was because I came off as confident, and level. It also helps that I have some experience teaching, but I think interviewers are very good at picking up on the confidence level of an interviewee. And ALTing may be a joke, but moving to another country (even one as posh as Japan) takes some confidence. OK, I'm stopping now. I intend this as positive reinforcement, please don't take it the wrong way.

Ananasboat
April 3rd, 2015, 09:11
This makes me regret being honest with my health on my application. I could see how me taking bi-weekly injections could be considered too big a hassle for them.

Or it could be irrelevant. Really wish you at least got a hint as to how to improve.


Best case scenario is that you lie about needing the injections. You get to Japan. Your supervisor finds out about them injections and you explain that you didn't want to get rejected so you didn't say anything. They don't rehire you next year.

Worst case scenario is they find out and send you home for lying on your application about health conditions, which is a pretty big offence.

Virgil
April 3rd, 2015, 09:18
This makes me regret being honest with my health on my application. I could see how me taking bi-weekly injections could be considered too big a hassle for them.


I think I understand. You have to realize that the laws governing certain prescription medicine is very different in Japan. I'm not an expert, maybe you've done your research. They simply might not be able to accommodate this type of thing.

Gunjumero
April 3rd, 2015, 09:18
No you could have gone on Virgil that sounds good to me.

I'm fine with my rejection, I know could have done a better interview and told better answers now.

Personally I wished they'd tell you a week later that you graded very low or that you won't be recommend to Tokyo and that the chances or you making it are now very unlikely. If Tokyo decides, that's still fine with saying only ''unlikely'' .

Do like a regular job interview where you know ,if you haven't heard after a few days, you should probably be moving on.

Ini
April 3rd, 2015, 09:20
Lots of people apply for JET. Lots of BOEs have specific requests. You might be Captain Super JET, but there could be 100 BOEs looking for someone with your very particular set of skills. Skills you have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make you a nightmare for people like Yukichan. If 200 other people apply from around the world with the exact same skill set then you are in trouble baby. Boss Tanaka in Tokyo will pick the 100 sexiest looking mofos for the shortlist, make 50 alternates and send the 50 uggos back to the land of foreign devils. What I'm saying is if you put in a good application, had a good interview and still got rejected then your eyes weren't blue enough, your hair wasn't blonde enough, you were too short and you weren't showing enough cleavage in your application photo. Rather than invest in a TESOL go to Seoul and have some work done on those bingo wings and you'll be accepted licketly split.

Virgil
April 3rd, 2015, 09:26
I'm not going to lie. The JET application process is insane. That's why so many people look down on the "All my eggs in the JET basket" type thing. It's just too risky, too unlikely, and too much time. If JET is such a goal like such people claim, then move on with your life while applying. Structure your life so that you'll be willing to drop everything on a whim. My upgrade put me in a really crappy situation, but I still took it. The JET application process simply doesn't accommodate waiting around.

MikeCarter
April 3rd, 2015, 09:26
Best case scenario is that you lie about needing the injections. You get to Japan. Your supervisor finds out about them injections and you explain that you didn't want to get rejected so you didn't say anything. They don't rehire you next year.

Worst case scenario is they find out and send you home for lying on your application about health conditions, which is a pretty big offence.

Best case scenario would have been better than flat out rejection, and based on what's been said, worst case scenario is unlikely given the effort needed to bring new people over. The real best case scenario is that they would have never found out or by the time I got there didn't care though, lol.

Still, not much point on brooding on it now. Not like I can change the application or even risk lying next year given they'd probably give my last application a glance. All I can do now is decide if I want to reapply next year, and if so how I can improve on what happened this year.


I think I understand. You have to realize that the laws governing certain prescription medicine is very different in Japan. I'm not an expert, maybe you've done your research. They simply might not be able to accommodate this type of thing.

Yeah, I had already looked into it. The medication I take has been legal in Japan since like, 2010 or something. Granted, there's a few reasons it could have worked against me anyway. Not being able to drive + needing to get medication once every 3ish months may have seemed like too much effort to accommodate for them. In reality it just means I would have needed to take a train day once every three months, which is easily doable. Alternatively they could have just saw I needed medication for a non-mental issue and red stamped my application by reflex.

I really hope the medication isn't the reason though, since it's something I can't change.

Tomonster
April 3rd, 2015, 09:27
You're misunderstanding the source of my dismay. JET is a long process, but your odds of getting in are actually very good compared to almost any other job, and yet I still didn't make it. I don't have any delusions about Japan being this amazing place or that this is a dream job, I'm just pissed that apparently I didn't even meet their illusive minimum standard.
.

The result of JET is not down to luck!

You meet their minimum standard if you get to the interview stage otherwise they wouldn't invite you

However they are not arbitrarily rolling the dice to determine whether you get the job (despite what people say), you are being compared against every single applicant around the world so what makes you stand out? Do you have teaching experience? Do you speak Japanese? Do you coach kids at the local football club? All of these things are not guarantees to get in but sure do improve your chances!

If you don't have these things why would Jet chose you, they want the best candidates. That goes for every job application you will go through.

Virgil
April 3rd, 2015, 09:27
Ini, will you marry me?

MikeCarter
April 3rd, 2015, 09:31
Lots of people apply for JET. Lots of BOEs have specific requests. You might be Captain Super JET, but there could be 100 BOEs looking for someone with your very particular set of skills. Skills you have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make you a nightmare for people like Yukichan. If 200 other people apply from around the world with the exact same skill set then you are in trouble baby. Boss Tanaka in Tokyo will pick the 100 sexiest looking mofos for the shortlist, make 50 alternates and send the 50 uggos back to the land of foreign devils. What I'm saying is if you put in a good application, had a good interview and still got rejected then your eyes weren't blue enough, your hair wasn't blonde enough, you were too short and you weren't showing enough cleavage in your application photo. Rather than invest in a TESOL go to Seoul and have some work done on those bingo wings and you'll be accepted licketly split.

That was downright inspirational.


The result of JET is not down to luck!

You meet their minimum standard if you get to the interview stage otherwise they wouldn't invite you

However they are not arbitrarily rolling the dice to determine whether you get the job (despite what people say), you are being compared against every single applicant around the world so what makes you stand out? Do you have teaching experience? Do you speak Japanese? Do you coach kids at the local football club? All of these things are not guarantees to get in but sure do improve your chances!

If you don't have these things why would Jet chose you, they want the best candidates. That goes for every job application you will go through.

Hmm, I'd disagree greatly. HR is a huge mess of things, and you're just flat out wrong if you think they can consistently pick the best people. I do find it rather amusing that you're so adamant to believe only the best people get in. Not surprisingly seeing as you got in though.

Virgil
April 3rd, 2015, 09:34
JET frequently makes horrible bungles with shortlisters. It's simply too hard to predict who is going to freak their shit once they're away from home (so many fresh uni grads.) It's been said before - your home stay don't mean shiat. I've heard horror stories, yo.

Tomonster
April 3rd, 2015, 09:44
Hmm, I'd disagree greatly. HR is a huge mess of things, and you're just flat out wrong if you think they can consistently pick the best people. I do find it rather amusing that you're so adamant to believe only the best people get in. Not surprisingly seeing as you got in though.

Im not saying they get the best people all the time, however if you don't tick the right boxes on the forms and other people do, you aren't going to get chosen.

word
April 3rd, 2015, 09:55
It's not ESID- very few ALTs have to be at school on the weekend. That's a bizarre question for the interviewer to ask.It was probably asked in a slightly different way, actually; I was asked a similar question during my interview. It was more along the lines of a hypothetical: "What if you frequently had to be at school on weekends and couldn't travel?" or something like that.


Guys. JET is a job. Nothing more. You've all built it into a grand construct, a Valhalla that exists for the worthy. Some of these posts reek of desperation, and I'm sure that was obvious in the interview. This is a job where you work with children and teach, if you're lucky. It is not a way to get your spouse to the country with you, and it's not simply a means of getting to the Land of the Rising Sun. It is a job, and if you've been rejected... well, it happens. There are other jobs, and even other jobs in Japan.word


In other words, this is a case where your rejection doesn't have to do with your abilities or qualifications, but pure freaking luck.Not really. There's an element of chance, to be sure, but this is inevitable in any sort of personnel-screening process. CLAIR does all they can to select the best candidates they can, and I've been told that the process is reviewed and improvements are attempted based on past successes and failures (though I know nothing about this review procedure). They do okay; most JETs are pretty decent people who do reasonably well at the job, in my experience. I might even go so far as to say that in the six years that I've been here, I've noticed an apparent improvement in the quality of the average JET, even. Even with the best, most comprehensive screening process, though, sometimes a whackadoo slips through and crashes the JET into the side of the mountain (too soon?), and there's just nothing anyone can do about it. Such incidents don't mean that the screening process is completely random or should be tossed.


I'm just pissed that apparently I didn't even meet their illusive minimum standard.*elusive


JET frequently makes horrible bungles with shortlisters. It's simply too hard to predict who is going to freak their shit once they're away from home (so many fresh uni grads.) It's been said before - your home stay don't mean shiat. I've heard horror stories, yo.Yeah, but there are a lot more success stories that you don't hear.

Virgil
April 3rd, 2015, 10:05
I absolutely agree. Many JETs I have met in my area are downright pleasant people.

vaterross
April 3rd, 2015, 10:06
I would not recommend lying on the medical form for Japan. Especially as JET is probably the most flexible Native English Teacher scheme regarding health issues. And anytime you start mixing your employment with your health insurance in nations where privacy is a non-concept, things have the risk of coming out.

Interestingly enough, I was auto rejected three times by EPIK (South Korea's JET) as the self health report is essentially a pass/fail form. It took me until a recruiter explained why I was rejected to realize it. My fourth time applying I omitted any health issues from the form and bingo, instant acceptance.

And to those of you rejected, it almost certainly says very little about you as a person and more likely reflects the byzantine nature of the application process. I was rejected by AEON once, and EPIK three times before I was able to land a job. The first was due to me not being ready to interview and the others were due to application vagaries. And these are essentially no qualification jobs, so needless to say that didn't make me feel too great about myself. The people who seem to do the best in this gig are the people who treat it as a job, and not some sort of life affirming thing. Those people burn out fast.

MikeCarter
April 3rd, 2015, 10:11
I would not recommend lying on the medical form for Japan. Especially as JET is probably the most flexible Native English Teacher scheme regarding health issues. And anytime you start mixing your employment with your health insurance in nations where privacy is a non-concept, things have the risk of coming out.

Interestingly enough, I was auto rejected three times by EPIK (South Korea's JET) as the self health report is essentially a pass/fail form. It took me until a recruiter explained why I was rejected to realize it. My fourth time applying I omitted any health issues from the form and bingo, instant acceptance.


I feel like I may be missing something. You say you shouldn't lie on medical forms, then say you got into EPIK because you lied?

Virgil
April 3rd, 2015, 10:18
He's saying JET is a lot more understanding of medical stuff than EPIK. EPIK is for Korea, and it seems like their medical requirements are more absolute.

greyjoy
April 3rd, 2015, 11:11
You can pretty much rest assured that if your medical issues were a problem, you would have never gotten an interview. It's exceedingly unlikely that it prevented you from getting in despite your interview.

I applied and failed to even get an interview when I was younger, and it's frustrating not knowing why. But I just continued on with my life. When I applied again years later, I got in.
Do not make this JET's problem. It's not that they chose some random inconsequential reason not to select you. You have plenty of room to improve yourself, and plenty of time to do so. Or don't, and apply to Interac.

mothy
April 3rd, 2015, 11:29
Although there is a process, [in my opinion] the process is flawed and loads of [what I perceive to be] terrible people make it onto JET every year. So just because you think you did everything perfectly and didn't make it, it doesn't mean much.
But there is a process so the most likely way you failed is not being as good as the other applicants.
Just take comfort in the facts that Japan is a horrible place to live and work [in my opinion], and ALTing is a horrible job[in my opinion]. Breathe a sigh of relief that you won't have to put up with that [stuff] and go get a [different] job.

word
April 3rd, 2015, 11:56
Dammit, mothy; this is Applying!

quis
April 3rd, 2015, 12:23
Guys. JET is a job. Nothing more. You've all built it into a grand construct, a Valhalla that exists for the worthy. Some of these posts reek of desperation, and I'm sure that was obvious in the interview. This is a job where you work with children and teach, if you're lucky. It is not a way to get your spouse to the country with you, and it's not simply a means of getting to the Land of the Rising Sun. It is a job, and if you've been rejected... well, it happens. There are other jobs, and even other jobs in Japan.

I think this is really important. It's a job. The interview was for a job application. I really question anyone who looks at JET as The Best Job I Will Ever Have in The Best Country in The World or anyone who cried and jumped if they were shortlisted. I'm starting JET this year and I'm not expecting it to be some kind of 24-7 Nippon Banzai Love Fest where I have beautiful cultural experiences every five minutes.

I actually spent time in my interview addressing this - the practical, day-to-day realities of living and working in Japan - and I hope it made the panel think that I was a responsible adult and not some weirdo Japanophile with no life skills.



-"You say you like travelling. With JET you would have to stay at the school most weekends. Would this bother you?" I said "No" but secretly thought yes. I bet my faced revealed the truth.


In my interview I was asked how I would handle being asked to work on the weekend. The answer came easily to me: "JET is a job. Working on the weekend may be part of that job." They then asked me if my friends had made plans long in advance for the weekend. Again: "JET is a job. It would come first. But I would see if my supervisor was happy to negotiate." It's like any other job in that you may be expected to do things or sacrifice some of your personal time. Although from all of the research I have done working weekends is a massive ESID and I knew that when I answered them.

BifCarbet
April 3rd, 2015, 12:46
It may just have been my prefecture, but I knew of zero ALTs who were required to regularly work weekends. I knew a CIR whose standard workweek was Tuesday to Saturday, but she was a CIR at an international village. I would feel confident saying I never met an ALT who worked weekends more than once or twice a season.

word
April 3rd, 2015, 12:52
At my last school, we had weekend stuff pretty regularly. I remember that during Septembers & Octobers in particular, I almost nevar had a free weekend.

mothy
April 3rd, 2015, 19:27
Dammit, mothy; this is Applying!
That's your most bullshit censorship yet. Is this fucking official now and I'm not allowed to be anti-JET Programme? I know you've been longing to flex your mod muscle since you've been on vacation, but you got to find a better excuse than that.

word
April 3rd, 2015, 19:55
That's your most bullsh*t censorship yet. Is this f*cking official now and I'm not allowed to be anti-JET Programme? I know you've been longing to flex your mod muscle since you've been on vacation, but you got to find a better excuse than that.You're right; I probably went too far. I'm sorry. I wanted to make your post somewhat more appropriate for Applying. Applying is not Official but I would like to keep this place *somewhat* welcoming and positive. You are allowed to be anti-JET Programme, but please do your best to remember that a lot of these guys don't understand either of our forum personalities well yet, so may not know how to take some of the stuff that you post. I'll try to refrain from being so obnoxiously heavy-handed with my moderation in the future.

gibbity
April 3rd, 2015, 21:59
You're misunderstanding the source of my dismay. JET is a long process, but your odds of getting in are actually very good compared to almost any other job, and yet I still didn't make it. I don't have any delusions about Japan being this amazing place or that this is a dream job, I'm just pissed that apparently I didn't even meet their illusive minimum standard.



This makes me regret being honest with my health on my application. I could see how me taking bi-weekly injections could be considered too big a hassle for them.

Or it could be irrelevant. Really wish you at least got a hint as to how to improve.

Oh well, time to move on.
I don't think the health really did anything. I get an infusion once every 2 months and they didn't seem to bat an eye when I mentioned it.

Cbill1
April 3rd, 2015, 23:11
I know a lot of people are talking about it, but honestly? If you lie about your medical stuff you're gonna be in for a bad time. Not in the "your BoE will find out and they'll can you" kind of way, but in the "you are putting yourself at serious risk" kind of way.

The forms exist so that JET can place you somewhere your medical needs can be accommodated. If you get rejected based on medical needs alone, it was because they couldn't find a placement that fit those criteria. The only thing lying will do in this scenario is exacerbate the problem; JET isn't going to magically find someplace to fit your needs when you lie on your application, and even if they did, it's extremely unlikely that you'll be placed there since they don't know what you need. More likely than not, you'll be worse off and have a harder time getting medical stuff taken care of.

This goes double for mental illnesses. Yes, there are a lot of people who are able to succeed on JET with depression/bad/what have you, but shit is hard. Culture shock's a bitch, working in an unfamiliar environment surrounded by a foreign language all day is stressful, and SID exists (and is made markedly worse by the fact that you don't have central heating and your house's walls will be made of paper). You could be in a village where you're the only foreigner there, what then? How will your depression affect you? If there's a chance that you'll need face-to-face therapy in English that's something JET needs to know before they place you somewhere where the nearest therapist is eight hours away.

Don't get me wrong; there are a lot of problems with JET and its application process, but asking for a clear medical history so they can accommodate you is not one of them.

patjs
April 3rd, 2015, 23:33
That was downright inspirational.



Hmm, I'd disagree greatly. HR is a huge mess of things, and you're just flat out wrong if you think they can consistently pick the best people. I do find it rather amusing that you're so adamant to believe only the best people get in. Not surprisingly seeing as you got in though.

OK I kind of felt sorry for you but now I don't. It's getting kind of obvious why you were not selected.

There's a process. It's not a roll of the dice. You're right though- once you get to the interview stage there is a pretty good chance of you being accepted or an alternate. So, there was something in the interview that was a major red flag for the panel and they rejected you. Sorry, but that's the cold hard truth. It's not arbitrary.

Kurisuchan
April 4th, 2015, 00:25
That's why we decided to stick around and apply for JET. It's the best option if you have dependents. I'm curious to know if anyone actually got shortlisted with dependents???
I was shortlisted with a dependent.

Swmrgrl
April 4th, 2015, 06:47
That's why we decided to stick around and apply for JET. It's the best option if you have dependents. I'm curious to know if anyone actually got shortlisted with dependents???
I was short-listed, and have a husband and two children.

mothy
April 4th, 2015, 07:42
You're right;

Thank you.

Ini
April 4th, 2015, 09:35
I'm an homosexual transgendered person of color from mixed Asian descent bringing over my 3 partners and our 12 children. I have a long history of mental and physical health issues that require a very specific course of regular medication which can only be administered at 4 locations in the greater Tokyo area and my entire extended family is dying of terminal illnesses. I got accepted

genkispirit
April 4th, 2015, 10:07
In my interview I was asked how I would handle being asked to work on the weekend. The answer came easily to me: "JET is a job. Working on the weekend may be part of that job." They then asked me if my friends had made plans long in advance for the weekend. Again: "JET is a job. It would come first. But I would see if my supervisor was happy to negotiate." It's like any other job in that you may be expected to do things or sacrifice some of your personal time. Although from all of the research I have done working weekends is a massive ESID and I knew that when I answered them.

I was accepted, this was the approach that I took as well. Whenever they asked what I would do if X happened. I basically said, I'm representative of JET and that my responsibility is to my job first.

BifCarbet
April 4th, 2015, 10:07
I'm an homosexual transgendered person of color from mixed Asian descent bringing over my 3 partners and our 12 children. I have a long history of mental and physical health issues that require a very specific course of regular medication which can only be administered at 4 locations in the greater Tokyo area and my entire extended family is dying of terminal illnesses. I got accepted

You'll be fine. I know of 9 ALTs from my consulate who got accepted who were homosexual, transgender people of mixed-Asian descent with several dependents who (including the ALTs) all had grave health issues and psychiatric conditions.

They're all doing well.

BifCarbet
April 4th, 2015, 10:12
I was accepted, this was the approach that I took as well. Whenever they asked what I would do if X happened. I basically said, I'm representative of JET and that my responsibility is to my job first.

Yeah, being an adult, or at least pretending to be one is a good way to score points in the interview. A lot of people seem to overlook that.

MikeCarter
April 4th, 2015, 10:49
Yeah, being an adult, or at least pretending to be one is a good way to score points in the interview. A lot of people seem to overlook that.

Why do you think that?

I got the same question and answered roughly the same way. I'd actually be really surprised if anyone answered a work question like that with anything other than that they'd do what their supervisor asks of them.

BifCarbet
April 4th, 2015, 12:57
Why do you think that?

I got the same question and answered roughly the same way. I'd actually be really surprised if anyone answered a work question like that with anything other than that they'd do what their supervisor asks of them.

I was just talking about a childish attitude toward JET applications and interviews that is pretty common.

webstaa
April 6th, 2015, 08:50
I was just talking about a childish attitude toward JET applications and interviews that is pretty common.

There are a lot of JET applicants for whom JET is a first 'real' job. Or at least a first 'real' interview/application process. And fast food/gas station attendant interviews don't count...

BifCarbet
April 6th, 2015, 10:57
There are a lot of JET applicants for whom JET is a first 'real' job. Or at least a first 'real' interview/application process. And fast food/gas station attendant interviews don't count...

Yes, like I said.

ktamzin
April 10th, 2015, 21:52
I think you're looking way to into this Mike. It's only a job, they have a set number of positions to fill. Don't take it personal, if it was a medication thing you wouldn't have been chosen for interview, JET wouldn't waste time and money on a candidate they didn't see fit.


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