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moonbeam
April 26th, 2015, 10:58
So I have a few fillings that I need to get taken care of eventually. I could get it done here in US, before I leave, but it'll be expensive because I'll exceed my insurance quota and they won't cover it. So my question to you guys already in Japan is how does the dental insurance work in Japan? I know it might take a million visits to get everything fixed but do they also have quotas I need to worry about? Will it also be expensive over there?

Ananasboat
April 26th, 2015, 11:06
So I have a few fillings that I need to get taken care of eventually. I could get it done here in US, before I leave, but it'll be expensive because I'll exceed my insurance quota and they won't cover it. So my question to you guys already in Japan is how does the dental insurance work in Japan? I know it might take a million visits to get everything fixed but do they also have quotas I need to worry about? Will it also be expensive over there?

My filling was super cheap, and it feels great. I would suggest getting those sorts of dental things done in Japan. If there's anything more difficult than a filling going on in your mouth do it in the states.

moonbeam
April 26th, 2015, 11:19
Cool, thanks!

Ebi
April 26th, 2015, 11:42
I've had no problem with dentists in Japan so far. In fact, I wish I started going sooner. I put it off because I was worried about the billions of visits and other horror stories I heard from other ALTs. But my local dentist is really cool. The first time I went, I got in right away and they fixed everything in one visit. There are tons of dentists, so if you don't like your first one, go somewhere else.

Gizmotech
April 26th, 2015, 21:09
Always get your work done in Japan if you are American. The work here is cheaper than any deductible back home unless you're on an amazing insurance program. The work is top notch, they just take a few visits is all. You will have planets of time to get it done on your job.

richief_611
April 28th, 2015, 15:47
It’s way cheaper, but the only problem is that if you have a lot of fillings, expect to go 3-4+ times, or 1 filling per visit. Or they may even do half a filling one appointment, and then finish it the next time. It’s weird like that.

I know that my dentist in the USA could do 4 or 5 fillings on one appointment.

Even cleanings might take 2 appointments, IDK why…

moonbeam
May 1st, 2015, 09:17
Yeah, I had six done in one visit over here and I've got another six to go before the treatment is done...but I think I might put it off because of my current insurance quotes.

Thanks for the input everyone!

greyjoy
May 1st, 2015, 14:22
Just for reference, don't count on your procedure definitely being super cheap here. I think maybe I mentioned this somewhere, but one of my fillings here cost ¥3000 and the other cost ¥35000. The second used a different material not covered by insurance. It's probably still cheaper than America, and maybe other countries too, but just be aware you may need to budget more.

ambrosse
May 1st, 2015, 19:10
I recently had white filling put in here in the states. My estimate for metal was about $68, estimate for the white was about $320 or so, lol. That's with insurance though.

moonbeam
May 2nd, 2015, 05:29
Well, thanks to my insurance quota, if I were to get my fillings done here it'd be around $900. So...it sounds like Japan is still the better option.

Fantasylife
May 5th, 2015, 10:51
I recently had white filling put in here in the states. My estimate for metal was about $68, estimate for the white was about $320 or so, lol. That's with insurance though.

Jeebus! At my dentist the silver was $25 and the white $79. I'm trying to get all mine work done before I go. Only a crown left to go. After that, I'll only have to schedule a cleaning at some point in Japan (assuming I won't need any more fillings in the near future).

frayedflower
May 5th, 2015, 13:00
Silly question, but does anyone know anything about dental implants in Japan - like whether or not they are covered in certain situations, how the process works, etc. and so on?

ambrosse
May 6th, 2015, 09:57
Jeebus! At my dentist the silver was $25 and the white $79.

It depends on the type of insurance you have and where the fillings are located. Mine were back molars, so it wasn't necessary to get them filled with white, but the white does hold together a lot better for longer. Plus my dentist is a champ. Never once did a botched job. I love her, haha. I'm actually going to schedule a general cleaning before I leave (though it'll be entirely out of pocket for about $108 or so since I already got my scheduled check-up back in February).

Elysi
May 18th, 2015, 15:17
Anyone have any experience/knowledge of having wisdom teeth removed in Japan? I'm debating if I want to get them done before I leave, or just wait and hope they don't cause any problems for the next few years. I've had a few issues with swelling, but nothing recently (knock on wood). So just wondering if it would be worth it to just get it over with. I have pretty good insurance right now, and my dentist recommend me to go to a dental surgeon to get it done if that makes a difference. Any insight/advice is much appreciated :)

ambrosse
May 20th, 2015, 22:15
Take care of your wisdom teeth here. If you're having problems with swelling, just go for it. Last thing you'd want happen is the wisdoms grow in more and screw up all your other teeth and have to get all that fixed in Japan.

When I got all four of mine removed way back when, my back molars couldn't touch for a good week because of swelling. Having close family/friends around to give you a hand is sure helpful when you can't eat normal food, haha.

webstaa
May 21st, 2015, 09:51
Take care of your wisdom teeth here. If you're having problems with swelling, just go for it. Last thing you'd want happen is the wisdoms grow in more and screw up all your other teeth and have to get all that fixed in Japan.

When I got all four of mine removed way back when, my back molars couldn't touch for a good week because of swelling. Having close family/friends around to give you a hand is sure helpful when you can't eat normal food, haha.

The major difference in dental work seems to be cost vs convenience. In the US, it's expensive - but the dentists hand out painkillers like candy and will gladly administer extra numbing/anesthesia (laughing gas anyone?.) In Japan, you'll pay much, much less, but you'll have to deal with multiple appointments, shitty painkillers, and much less effective anesthesia.

Although that might be due more to the frequency by which we hear horror stories instead of success stories about Japanese dentists.

BambooTelegraph
May 21st, 2015, 10:04
Yep. It's pretty cheap out here!

Elysi
May 21st, 2015, 10:49
Thanks everyone for the input! Definitely going to want painkillers & anesthesia going by what my dentist said about them, so another thing added to the ever growing list of stuff to get done before July. Oh joy...

CUPS
May 26th, 2015, 15:13
Is it just me who wouldn't even dream of letting a 'dentist' here go anywhere near their mouth?

This is the country that thinks it's ok (indeed - mandatory!) to brush within minutes of eating, plus it's the country that... well.. have you seen the state of people's teeth here?!

If I had the chance to get my teeth looked at/checked up by a USA dentist I would jump at the chance.

Madness.

Ananasboat
May 26th, 2015, 15:21
Every time I go to the dentist's I see people with xrays that look like their teeth were knocked out with buck shot.

But, like I said I got into this tooth trouble because I didn't want to see a dentist the first time I was here. Maybe if I had seen one when the problem began I wouldn't be where I am now.

Virgil
May 26th, 2015, 15:35
I think it's all genetic. You know. Small island countries.

Ananasboat
May 26th, 2015, 15:44
Dirty inbred Lannisters.

Ebi
May 28th, 2015, 19:08
Or it could have to do with the lack of fluoride in the water (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_fluoridation) and less (none?) of it in most toothpastes too. But I think topical application doesn't really do much compared to ingesting it.

Gizmotech
May 28th, 2015, 21:36
I really do think it comes from the excessive brushing to be honest. They brush after every meal and for like 5 minutes. Basically rubbing off all the enamel

Virgil
May 29th, 2015, 16:15
Or it could have to do with the lack of fluoride in the water (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_fluoridation) and less (none?) of it in most toothpastes too. But I think topical application doesn't really do much compared to ingesting it.
Eh I was basing this post off of old information I read. According to wikipedia it makes it back into your saliva via blood plasma. Pretty neat.

Isola
June 2nd, 2015, 11:30
Anyone have any experience/knowledge of having wisdom teeth removed in Japan? I'm debating if I want to get them done before I leave, or just wait and hope they don't cause any problems for the next few years. I've had a few issues with swelling, but nothing recently (knock on wood). So just wondering if it would be worth it to just get it over with. I have pretty good insurance right now, and my dentist recommend me to go to a dental surgeon to get it done if that makes a difference. Any insight/advice is much appreciated :)

I know I'm late to the party, but like I said in another thread, I really don't recommend getting your wisdom teeth out right before you come. If you have to, you have to, and I think getting it done in your home country is better than getting it done in Japan. But it is seriously such an unnecessary stress when you first arrive.

Your recovery might go smoothly. Mine did not. I had a bad reaction to the Vicodin, I was out of work for over a week at a time when I wanted to be saving up money, I couldn't eat normally for a while and was losing weight (which some might find to be a positive, but I looked kind of sickly)... This was all at a time when I was saying goodbye to people and getting ready to move to a foreign country.

Then I actually came to Japan, with gaping holes in my mouth that needed to be cleaned out after eating so little food bits didn't get trapped in my gums as the holes started to close. And now I have a scar on my elbow from an unfortunate gum-cleaning incident.

In short, one of my biggest regrets before coming was getting my wisdom teeth out.

books8137
June 3rd, 2015, 05:24
If anyone is looking into wisdom teeth extraction in the States, I would recommend you do it now or at least within the next two weeks. I got mine taken out two weeks ago (overcrowding and impacted growth) and even though it's a pain being careful eating and keeping the extraction sites clean, I'm glad I did it here. Even though it isn't a huge deal, it's still somewhat major surgery. Getting it done while you're living and working in another country with very little in the way of direct support, i.e. no friends and family living with you, as well as language/culture barriers will probably be really stressful, which can delay recovery. If you can afford to take time off for the surgery itself and maybe a day or two after while still in the U.S., do it. Yes, it can be expensive, but many dentists and oral surgeons offer interest-free payment plans and will try their best to work with you even if you don't have insurance.

As for the surgery/operation itself, it can take anywhere from a few weeks to two months to heal completely and like others have echoed, the first few days are going to suck. You want knockout drugs unless you enjoy listening to your teeth being crushed and drilled out. You want extra-strength painkillers just in case. And you want easy access to your doc in case of infection/dry socket/other post-surgery complications, especially a doctor who can speak in English. Most importantly though, you want your family and/or friends to take care of you at least the first few days because you'll be in pain right after and will be subsisting on soft food days through the first few days. The oral surgeon I went to had great reviews on Google and he handled my issues (3 extractions, 1 coronectomy because that tooth had already grown/wrapped around the mandibular nerve) really well. Surgery took about an hour. I went under general anesthesia, so coming out from that wasn't fun, but at least I wasn't conscious during the procedure.

Just a final general note, if you are having wisdom teeth issues or will likely have them, best to get them out before you're 25 because they'll have grown deep roots by that point. The older you get, the greater chance of complications plus recovery time slows down too.