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singinglupines
May 10th, 2015, 03:49
I was wondering what denomination of bills is too high for actual usage. I had a Japanese friend travel with me recently and she paid me back in yen but I'm pretty sure that I won't be able to use the 10000 ones, ha. Can you exchange them at a bank for smaller bills?

BifCarbet
May 10th, 2015, 05:13
Those bills are very commonly used. You can use them to buy a 180 yen train ticket at stations or a bottle of water at a little shop. You don't need to worry about that.

mrcharisma
May 10th, 2015, 07:02
I was wondering what denomination of bills is too high for actual usage. I had a Japanese friend travel with me recently and she paid me back in yen but I'm pretty sure that I won't be able to use the 10000 ones, ha. Can you exchange them at a bank for smaller bills?

There's no better feeling than breaking a man for a couple of cans of Asahi and a deck of ciggies. They're used every single day for the most minor of purposes. Enjoy your spending.

singinglupines
May 10th, 2015, 07:50
Woah. I've had Czech people refuse to take my money before because it was too much! (500 czk, $25 bill, for something around 50 czk, $2)

I will exercise my spending power. The more coins and bills the better, right? XD

BifCarbet
May 10th, 2015, 07:56
There's no better feeling than breaking a man for a couple of cans of Asahi and a deck of ciggies. They're used every single day for the most minor of purposes. Enjoy your spending.

I read that as an English word first, and thought you were very cruel.

Ananasboat
May 10th, 2015, 08:11
Breaking men and mans is a daily ritual of mine.

But since you mentioned coins, singinglupines, if you ever have exact change for coins use them! So many people here stupidly refuse to use their coins because "it's a hassle," but you will drown in an avalanche of coins unless you use them. The "dollars" here are the size of American quarters, so it's really easy to mentally devalue them while accumulating 8,000 yen in change.

BifCarbet
May 10th, 2015, 08:29
My gas station accepted all coins, so I never let them accumulate, and it was the best thing ever.

Gizmotech
May 10th, 2015, 08:31
10,000 is essentially our hundred dollar notes back home, with a huge difference. this is not a credit/plastic country, so large amounts of cash carry and exchange is VERY normal.

Also, if you're getting money before coming over, don't let the bank give you the 2,000 denomination notes. They can be refused over here because they just aren't in circulation.

singinglupines
May 10th, 2015, 08:44
Yeah, coins are super useful! I've spent a fair amount of time with euros and czech crowns which have a $5 coin so I get that! I'm also the type of person that loves getting together exact change.

Good to know about the 2000s. I'm just taking what she gave me and I'll pull the rest from ATMs as I go. I will miss swiping my credit card for a candy bar. The US is the only place I've been that's so heavy plastic favored. Such convenience.

acpc2203
May 10th, 2015, 10:52
Yeah 2000s are kind of like 2 dollar bills, though in Okinawa they are more common due to them being printed in commemoration of a summit that took place there, so if you end up going there it won't be much of an issue. I remember getting them as change somewhat often and no one batted an eye when I used them except on the mainland.

Ananasboat
May 10th, 2015, 11:25
They're not impossible to use from what I've seen. There was a German dude who brought all of his money over during exchange and the bank only gave him 2sens. It was regularly met with exclamations of wonder and excitement. He even had people offer to pay him 3sen for a 2sen bill. He never reported people refusing to take them.

mrcharisma
May 10th, 2015, 22:30
Yeah I got a few two senners in my party bag from Bank of Scotland on the way over. Used them all without anyone blinking an eye.

greyjoy
May 11th, 2015, 16:40
In America it's illegal to refuse currency, so you might feel like an asshole buying a pack of gum for $.25 using a $100 bill, but technically a merchant can't refuse you. In practice, that's not always the case, as a lot of places will post signs saying they don't accept anything over $20 bills. I wonder if that's the same everywhere. I've never heard of 2000 notes being refused either, but I guess if a cashier drone were flustered enough by the lack of a slot, they might refuse it.

word
May 11th, 2015, 16:52
In America it's illegal to refuse currency, so you might feel like an asshole buying a pack of gum for $.25 using a $100 bill, but technically a merchant can't refuse you.

Damn I feel like an obnoxious arse for saying this, but that's not actually true; they can (http://www.snopes.com/business/money/pennies.asp).


In other words,U.S. currency and coins can be used for making payments, but merchants do not necessarily have to accept it for all forms of business transactions. If a shoemaker wants to sell his products for 8000 jelly beans per pair, he's entitled to do so; the buyer cannot demand that he accept the equivalent value in legal tender instead. However, legal tender is the default method of payment assumed in contractual agreements involving debts and payments for goods or services unless otherwise specified. So, for example, if an automobile dealer signs a contract agreeing to sell you a car for $8,000, but when you begin making monthly payments he rejects them and insists he wants to be paid in gold instead, you can go to court and have your debt discharged on the grounds that valid payment was offered and refused.

greyjoy
May 11th, 2015, 19:16
Of all things for you to feel like an ass about, word. That's one of those simple pieces of misinformation that's supported by an easily verifiable fact (it says it right there on our money!) so it bears no further investigation. I never even suspected it was untrue.

ambrosse
May 11th, 2015, 22:05
Damn I feel like an obnoxious arse for saying this, but that's not actually true; they can (http://www.snopes.com/business/money/pennies.asp).

I know at my work in the US, the tills get incredibly low on Sunday and oftentimes we don't have 10's for most of the day (the bank is closed). Our company forbids us to hold 20's in our drawers for theft reasons. So when a customer comes in and slaps a pack of gum down and hands us a $100 bill, we ask them if they have smaller change or a card. If they refuse, then we ask them if they'd like to do a money order or gift card instead. If no, then we hand them $97 in 5's and 1's, lol. They get so pissed.

Of course if I or a coworker hasn't dropped 20's yet, we can use them to give people change. Once they're dropped in the safe, they're unusable.

BifCarbet
May 12th, 2015, 04:28
but I guess if a cashier drone were flustered enough by the lack of a slot, they might refuse it.

This seems so plausible and even likely to me.