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ambrosse
May 18th, 2015, 01:57
I created this thread because there will be food we love that is difficult or impossible to find in Japan.
If you're heading to Japan this July/August, feel free to share what you plan on having as a last home country meal before you leave.
Current Japan folks, what was your last meal if you remember?


To add to my sickening pizza binge that started once I got shortlisted, I will be having Gino's pizza in Chicago along with a tall glass of rootbeer.

Virgil
May 18th, 2015, 03:27
Actual tacos, decent sized steak

weepinbell
May 18th, 2015, 03:40
Maybe I'll go Mexican... I'm gonna miss queso with the biggest passion. Cheese in general... But dat queso. Are margs a common drink of choice in Japan? Or am I gonna need a jumbo before I'm gone. ;)

kefira
May 18th, 2015, 03:50
I've also been chowing down on pizza even when I only occasionally had it previous to being shortlisted. It's like my body knows what it might be missing out on in a few months.

But hoping to have a green chile sausage breakfast burrito at least once or twice in that last week so I hear you on the Mexican food, weepinbell.

BifCarbet
May 18th, 2015, 04:23
Cheez-It

a big bowl of Cheez-It and a tall glass of milk

eat and repeat

Saga
May 18th, 2015, 05:27
I actually think I might go for Mexican food, too. That or pizza. While it's fairly easy to get pizza in Japan (that was my go-to food last time when ever I got homesick), I'm pretty sure getting gluten-free pizza is going to be impossible.

Maybe the day before I leave I'll go to an Indian buffet for lunch, too.

JetMaybe2015
May 18th, 2015, 06:17
Get your mexican food in.

weepinbell
May 18th, 2015, 06:33
Oh man no I've got it. Mexican food/queso/the biggest Marg available a couple days before departure.... Then the night before, I'm getting myself a big ol plate of gourmet Mac n cheese at my favorite local restaurant.... My love for a good Mac is unparalleled.....

naginataonthebrain
May 18th, 2015, 06:36
Before I leave my hometown, I'm eating my weight in Jim n' Nicke BBQ and their famous cheddar cheese biscuits. Since I'm leaving out of Atlanta, my family and I will hit up a Persian restaurant because getting good chicken bargh and kashkebadumjan (fried eggplant dip) will pretty much be non-existant in Japan.

Perilwink
May 18th, 2015, 06:37
Oh man no I've got it. Mexican food/queso/the biggest Marg available a couple days before departure.... Then the night before, I'm getting myself a big ol plate of gourmet Mac n cheese at my favorite local restaurant.... My love for a good Mac is unparalleled.....

These meals sound so beautiful I could cry.

As I'm unfamiliar with Atlanta, I can't really say what I'll have the night before departure, but I'd also love to eat as much Mediterranean as possible... can't imagine there are too many gyros and falafel in Japan?

naginataonthebrain
May 18th, 2015, 06:45
I'm not sure what hotel we will be staying at before our departure, but if we are right by the ATL airport, there is a pretty good Mediterranean diner near the Hilton, if my memory serves me correctly.

BifCarbet
May 18th, 2015, 06:47
These meals sound so beautiful I could cry.

As I'm unfamiliar with Atlanta, I can't really say what I'll have the night before departure, but I'd also love to eat as much Mediterranean as possible... can't imagine there are too many gyros and falafel in Japan?

Street kebab in Tokyo is goooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooood.

Virgil
May 18th, 2015, 07:41
Margharitas are findable in my area, but the tequila is shitty.

mrcharisma
May 18th, 2015, 07:55
feel free to share what you plan on having as a last 'Murican meal before you leave.
Current Japan folks, what was your last 'Murican meal if you remember?

What's wrong with English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Jamaican, Canadian, Australian, New Zealander, South African, Trinidadian or Singaporean incomers sharing their last suppers?

Margeritas are indeed plentiful. Cocktails are one thing that aren't a problem even in a relatively small town.

Virgil
May 18th, 2015, 07:58
What's wrong with English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Jamaican, Canadian, Australian, New Zealander, South African, Trinidadian or Singaporean incomers sharing their last suppers?

Margeritas are indeed plentiful. Cocktails are one thing that aren't a problem even in a relatively small town.
As long as they eat real food. Murrican food.

Fantasylife
May 18th, 2015, 08:11
Cereal. I don't think I'll miss anything as much as my morning crack.

Ananasboat
May 18th, 2015, 08:16
It wasn't really my official last meal, only because I had about a week to go before I left, but I went and ordered myself my greatest guilty pleasure. Dominoes.

It was one of their deeper pizzas, and I got extra sauce and extra cheese, and I went to town on it. There was so much sauce that I felt like I was swimming in it, and all the extra cheese was so heavy that it kept getting pulled off. Eventually I just had to fork and knife it.

I'm recreating that glorious moment of chub life when I go home, and I can't wait.

Virgil
May 18th, 2015, 08:33
You're the type of people that would request KFC or something for your "last meal" aren't you?

Zolrak 22
May 18th, 2015, 08:37
Dominoes.

That's usually where my friends and I go when we can't afford anything else.

A medium or large pizza for $7.99-$9.99 depending on the day.

Though it doesn't hold a candle to Mario's Pizza, that place is awesome... I just can't afford to go there xD.




You're the type of people that would request KFC or something for your "last meal" aren't you?

What would you have as a last meal?

I know mine would involve shrimp.

Probably barbecue ribs and etc. [emoji75]

Jiggit
May 18th, 2015, 08:44
The only correct answer is a roast. Lamb for me, I think.

Zolrak 22
May 18th, 2015, 08:53
The only correct answer is a roast. Lamb for me, I think.
I've never had lamb.

Though we usually roast pigs as a Christmas meal.

singinglupines
May 18th, 2015, 09:26
Mmm, I want Middle Eastern/Mediterranean probably.

haitch40
May 18th, 2015, 09:41
Already planned mine for next year if I get in.

Fish and chips.

Apparently it is hard to get it in places other than Britain and a few of our ex territories.

texxaport
May 18th, 2015, 09:52
I've read that Turkey isn't common in Japan. Is that true?


If that is the case, I'd want a huge Thanksgiving style Turkey feast.

webstaa
May 18th, 2015, 10:02
I had plenty of pizza and "Mexican" food before I left. Aside from tortillas, most Mexican ingredients aren't too difficult to find/order. And there are a couple nice steakhouses in Tokyo that I happen to visit on occasion (when I'm not getting steak from themeatguy etc.)

Pretty much every visit back to the states is a "eat everything but 'Japanese' food" excursion. Although shitty pizza is right at the top of the list. I can't find a shitty pepperoni pizza in my area to save my life.

Coolmanio
May 18th, 2015, 10:03
I've read that Turkey isn't common in Japan. Is that true?


If that is the case, I'd want a huge Thanksgiving style Turkey feast.

This is true. I live in Osaka and last year me and a bunch of JETs wanted to throw a Canadian thanksgiving party, but we could not find a turkey. We even went to Costco and they said they do not get them in :/

EAT YOUR TURKEY NOW

webstaa
May 18th, 2015, 10:17
This is true. I live in Osaka and last year me and a bunch of JETs wanted to throw a Canadian thanksgiving party, but we could not find a turkey. We even went to Costco and they said they do not get them in :/

EAT YOUR TURKEY NOW

You can order turkey through themeatguy.jp. Several of the Tohoku prefecture AJET branches organize Thanksgiving (US date rather than Canadian.) The only issue becomes finding an oven large enough to heat the bird.

Perilwink
May 18th, 2015, 10:38
I'm not sure what hotel we will be staying at before our departure, but if we are right by the ATL airport, there is a pretty good Mediterranean diner near the Hilton, if my memory serves me correctly.

Ooo, thanks for the heads up!


Street kebab in Tokyo is goooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooood.

SO THERE'S HOPE?? At least for those Tokyo Orientation days! :D

texxaport
May 18th, 2015, 10:43
You can order turkey through themeatguy.jp. Several of the Tohoku prefecture AJET branches organize Thanksgiving (US date rather than Canadian.) The only issue becomes finding an oven large enough to heat the bird.

Good to know! I will definitely take advantage of that website.

Penguee
May 18th, 2015, 10:54
Already planned mine for next year if I get in.

Fish and chips.

Apparently it is hard to get it in places other than Britain and a few of our ex territories.
You can order fish and chips at The Hub which is a "British Pub" Chain found in major cities. (In my experience
the best place to also find desperate-for-foreigner-boyfriend Japanese women, too.) They don't taste good, but I've never had authentic so not able to compare. But there are enough British ex-pats that it shouldn't be too hard to find a pint if you head to a larger city.

texxaport
May 18th, 2015, 10:59
You can order fish and chips at The Hub which is a "British Pub" Chain found in major cities. (In my experience
the best place to also find desperate-for-foreigner-boyfriend Japanese women, too.) They don't taste good, but I've never had authentic so not able to compare. But there are enough British ex-pats that it shouldn't be too hard to find a pint if you head to a larger city.

They may not taste good but I'm sure the fish and chips is okay.

Ananasboat
May 18th, 2015, 11:05
You're the type of people that would request KFC or something for your "last meal" aren't you?

Really not a fan of KFC. But I WOULD request a Five Guy's burger or the previously mentioned pizza monstrosity if someone were going to off me. Least they could do.

Virgil
May 18th, 2015, 11:15
I had plenty of pizza and "Mexican" food before I left. Aside from tortillas, most Mexican ingredients aren't too difficult to find/order.

Make the tortillas yourself, it's easy enough.

Finding stuff to make good Mexican food can actually be pretty challenging.

Gizmotech
May 18th, 2015, 11:16
My last supper was at toronto airport, it was a vile hamburger.

I consider the excellent poutine (for lunch) and the shwarma (for dinner) the day before excellent last meals

naginataonthebrain
May 18th, 2015, 12:02
This is true. I live in Osaka and last year me and a bunch of JETs wanted to throw a Canadian thanksgiving party, but we could not find a turkey. We even went to Costco and they said they do not get them in :/

EAT YOUR TURKEY NOW

That's interesting. My study abroad program managed to get turkeys for our thanksgiving party in Kyoto. Granted, they were the smallest turkeys I had ever seen, but they were indeed turkeys. I'm not sure where they ordered it from but I knew that they did it way in advance.

quis
May 18th, 2015, 12:27
I'm Australian so I don't know if I belong in this thread, but my last week is going to comprise the following:

1. Vietnamese food. Pho, banh khot, sugar cane prawn salad.

2. ALL OF THE LAKSAS.

3. Fish and chips.

4. Pizza.

My final meal will most likely be pizza.

ambrosse
May 18th, 2015, 12:38
What's wrong with English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Jamaican, Canadian, Australian, New Zealander, South African, Trinidadian or Singaporean incomers sharing their last suppers?


My bad~

Cbill1
May 18th, 2015, 12:52
Iirc, I was with my dad and we ordered pizza and beer to the hotel room.

Best last supper.

sourdoughsushi
May 18th, 2015, 14:27
Drink beer if you're into anything other than Budlight. Eat the mexican food, don't listen to people who say it's easy to get a hold of. It's more expensive and likely pretty out of the way if you aren't urban. Get that authentic(ish), delicious mexican food in while it's convenient.

Just had a conversation about Cheeze-its the other day. Reeses are also a thing.

Eat meat and more meat. And blueberries and raspberries.

webstaa
May 18th, 2015, 14:39
Drink beer if you're into anything other than Budlight. Eat the mexican food, don't listen to people who say it's easy to get a hold of. It's more expensive and likely pretty out of the way if you aren't urban. Get that authentic(ish), delicious mexican food in while it's convenient.


Ingredients are available. Good restaurants not so much. I'd double down with Mexican food for sure.

It's easier to make decent (satisfying) pizza than Mexican food (for me at least.)

Ebi
May 18th, 2015, 17:38
Drink beer if you're into anything other than Budlight. Eat the mexican food, don't listen to people who say it's easy to get a hold of. It's more expensive and likely pretty out of the way if you aren't urban. Get that authentic(ish), delicious mexican food in while it's convenient.

Just had a conversation about Cheeze-its the other day. Reeses are also a thing.
This seems pretty accurate for my corner of Japan.

I've seen Reeses at regular supermarkets from time to time and even Butterfingers at Yamaya. Not sure about Cheeze-Its because I don't like them anyway, but Japanese cheetos taste a little different. I think they actually use powder from real cheese, lol.

There are a few Mexican restaurants in my city, but I never go because their portion-sizes are disappointing for the price-tag. And I've never seen a margarita done right in Japan. I miss gyros and Greek food the most, but at least there are a few kebab places in town.


And blueberries and raspberries.
Yess! Berries are tough to find fresh but frozen is findable for some varieties. Dried fruit is stupidly expensive and they're almost always marketed as desserts so they're in tiny packages and loaded with sugar. You can barely taste the fruit... My husband and I brought back four bags of Costco dried fruit with us last time we were in the US since it was so cheap and we mix it in with our unsweetened yogurt every day.

singinglupines
May 18th, 2015, 20:28
Well then, raspberries it is. They are my favorite. Is it possible to find them frozen at least?

nostos
May 18th, 2015, 20:51
No frozen fruits at all at my inaka grocery store, but you can buy all kinds from Amazon, not too expensive.

I gorged on pizza for the last month and the morning before I left I had a huge bowl of fresh berries. Pretty sure I had Tim Hortons at the airport before leaving. /Canadian

ambrosse
May 18th, 2015, 20:53
Damn, blueberries are pretty much my favorite fruit. Well, I guess I'll be finding something else. -devours package after package of blueberries.

nostos
May 18th, 2015, 20:54
Blueberries are like one of the only affordable fruits at my grocery, but only around August.
(I also have an agricultural high school, and I think they grow them, so that could be why they're fairly cheap)

Ananasboat
May 18th, 2015, 21:28
Damn, blueberries are pretty much my favorite fruit. Well, I guess I'll be finding something else. -devours package after package of blueberries.

Blueberries are my second favorite fruit (can you guess the first?) and I'm growing a few blueberry bushes right now. It's awesome, and I can't wait until they start ripening. I can see their little berry bodies forming and I'm getting impatient. That sounded weird...

weepinbell
May 18th, 2015, 22:54
Ugh I love blueberries so much. Let's hope being suburban/urban will give me a little more access... also hoping Osaka has some decent Mexican - if not, at LEAST a good place for a marg. I think this might become my official mission in Japan. Also a place with good mac n cheese...

Gizmotech
May 18th, 2015, 23:05
You know there are things back home that you love to eat that you gains greater appreciation for by not eating. The longer you're here the more you adjust to what is and isn't available int the country. Probably the biggest change is the lack of variety that you I might be used to at home in your standard supermarket and while initially frustrating becomes okay if you're sufficiently flexible.

Zolrak 22
May 18th, 2015, 23:06
Blueberries are my second favorite fruit (can you guess the first?)


Strawberries? [emoji14]

Gizmotech
May 18th, 2015, 23:12
Strawberries? [emoji14]

Nah. Cock.

Shincantsen
May 19th, 2015, 00:02
Keep in mind that some consulates have a mandatory dinner/reception the night before departure, so you may need to adjust your last meal to the day before PDO.

I'm trying to remember my last meal, but it was too many moons ago. If I had the chance again I think I'd do a huge southern breakfast - biscuits and sausage and grits and hash-browns, mmmmm.

naginataonthebrain
May 19th, 2015, 00:06
Keep in mind that some consulates have a mandatory dinner/reception the night before departure, so you may need to adjust your last meal to the day before PDO.

I'm trying to remember my last meal, but it was too many moons ago. If I had the chance again I think I'd do a huge southern breakfast - biscuits and sausage and grits and hash-browns, mmmmm.

Hell yeah, hope aboard the soul food train. Also, trying to explain the wonder that is a meat n' three to a Japanese person doesn't go over too well.

ambrosse
May 19th, 2015, 00:30
Keep in mind that some consulates have a mandatory dinner/reception the night before departure, so you may need to adjust your last meal to the day before PDO.

I'm trying to remember my last meal, but it was too many moons ago. If I had the chance again I think I'd do a huge southern breakfast - biscuits and sausage and grits and hash-browns, mmmmm.


haha, yeah. My parents and I are driving down to Chicago and having the last supper the night before pre-departure orientation. Then they'll dump me off at the hotel where all the other JETs are staying for their one free night and off I go!

x_stei
May 19th, 2015, 01:06
The one thing I know I'll miss is breakfast foods... Waffles, pancakes omelettes. Can you tell I don't cook?

Not a big fan of pizza. But will have to scour for a good Mexican joint around here... Tacos in Ann Arbor is pretty good :).

And pho... Hmmmm!

I'm getting hungry already.

weepinbell
May 19th, 2015, 01:10
The one thing I know I'll miss is breakfast foods... Waffles, pancakes omelettes. Can you tell I don't cook?


Correct me if I'm wrong people in Japan, but I think with waffles, pancakes, and omlettes we'll be more than okay lol. Seems like they love their cute, fluffy waffles and pancakes at those cafes/bakeries. And isn't omurice a thing? Or is that just super novelty?

x_stei
May 19th, 2015, 01:26
Correct me if I'm wrong people in Japan, but I think with waffles, pancakes, and omlettes we'll be more than okay lol. Seems like they love their cute, fluffy waffles and pancakes at those cafes/bakeries. And isn't omurice a thing? Or is that just super novelty?

I know omurice exists but don't know about waffles, pancakes, and omelettes. But that is just me being hungry lol.

BifCarbet
May 19th, 2015, 01:41
I know omurice exists but don't know about waffles, pancakes, and omelettes. But that is just me being hungry lol.

Yep. All there. Easy to find. Also easy to make.

weepinbell
May 19th, 2015, 01:41
Lol for sure. Google image Japanese waffles and hotcakes. From what I've seen online, they have some damn good looking hotcakes... super thick. And it looks like waffles are considered more dessert-like but uh, I'm really not gonna be mad about icecream on my waffles...

As for pancakes though, I'm really looking forward to trying okonomiyaki. Definitely unlike any pancake I've ever had before!

Shincantsen
May 19th, 2015, 01:43
Lol for sure. Google image Japanese waffles and hotcakes. From what I've seen online, they have some damn good looking hotcakes... super thick. And it looks like waffles are considered more dessert-like but uh, I'm really not gonna be mad about icecream on my waffles...


The only problem is when you order pancakes they give you a tiny thimble-full of maple syrup. I have a mighty need for about half a cup of syrup per pancake.

x_stei
May 19th, 2015, 01:53
Lol for sure. Google image Japanese waffles and hotcakes. From what I've seen online, they have some damn good looking hotcakes... super thick. And it looks like waffles are considered more dessert-like but uh, I'm really not gonna be mad about icecream on my waffles...

As for pancakes though, I'm really looking forward to trying okonomiyaki. Definitely unlike any pancake I've ever had before!

I love Okonomiyaki! This is kind of a moot point, but it you could make it to NYC before August, Yakitori Taisho has a great okonomiyaki.

naginataonthebrain
May 19th, 2015, 03:11
Argggh my host mom in Kyoto makes the best okonomiyaki I've ever had. Sad that I won't be close to them this time around but hey, that's what holidays are for. And Peach airlines is starting service from Miyazaki to KIX in the fall so I can get there super cheap and eat my weight in okonomiyaki and takoyaki.

Ebi
May 19th, 2015, 08:22
Pancake mix is pretty easy to find since there are tons of recipe books about making sweets from pancakes. Waffles seem less popular, but I'm sure you could buy a waffle iron somewhere (or online) to get your fix. I had no trouble finding real maple syrup too, but I'm not sure about availability in the inaka.

As for other "breakfast foods", cereals are definitely less plentiful and less full of sugar, but I'm kind of glad I broke out of the habit of eating cereal every day. It's basically sugar floating in milk. I usually make breakfast sandwiches instead.

Bacon tastes different and doesn't get as crispy, but it's there. Ham and sausage exist, although certain kinds are expensive or impossible to find. Eggs are extremely plentiful and are actually safe to eat raw, so I've been very pleased with the quality.

I've found it pretty easy to adapt to the available produce, but I'm lucky to live close to a really big supermarket.

Ananasboat
May 19th, 2015, 08:42
I complain about not being able to get a proper "American Breakfast" since coming here, but I've been able to fashion one out of the things I find here.

There's basically only Texas Toast here, so that's great.
Eggs are amazing over here. I even have an egg vending machine by my house (go inaka life!)
I found really great sausages at Costco and I buy up a ton when I go there.
Ovens are small, so it's difficult to make homefries, but I can do it. Sometimes I even switch half of the potatoes for kabocha and that's great as well.

I don't bother with the bacon here. They seem to like to eat it raw, and their scrambled eggs are usually soupy as hell. Japanese Western breakfasts are a joke.

sourdoughsushi
May 19th, 2015, 08:47
Ah, bacon. That's right. You can buy stuff that tastes like it, so at least you get that, but it is otherwise just ham-like.

moonbeam
May 19th, 2015, 08:52
I'll probably just go on a food crawl of all my favorite things. Like, make a large breakfast with bacon, eggs and toast with apple butter and blackberry jam. I'll probably also go to Chik-Fil-A. A milkshake is a must. And Maryland seafood with Old Bay seasoning. And steak. And hard cider, sangria (with fresh fruit!) and non-Japanese beer.

Virgil
May 19th, 2015, 09:01
Eggs are amazing over here. I even have an egg vending machine by my house (go inaka life!)
I found really great sausages at Costco and I buy up a ton when I go there.


First: Egg vending machine. The <insertexpletivehere>.
Second: Do you go all the way to Kitakyushu for Costco?

Zolrak 22
May 19th, 2015, 09:06
First: Egg vending machine. The fuck.
Second: Do you go all the way to Kitakyushu for Costco?
Can you imagine the advertisements?

"Freshly Squeezed " eggs at your convenience.

Great quality doesn't have to wait.

Why would you go to a supermarket in the mornings when you can just squeeze an egg.

Squeeze one today.

Ananasboat
May 19th, 2015, 09:15
First: Egg vending machine. The <insertexpletivehere>.
Second: Do you go all the way to Kitakyushu for Costco?

First: It's an unrefrigerated locker box (think the lockers at train stations) thing that has like 18 eggs in it for 400 yen. They're local (I think) because I see a guy come around in a truck every once in a while and put the eggs in.

Second: I think it's in Fukuoka? Not sure now that I think about it.



Can you imagine the advertisements?

"Freshly Squeezed " eggs at your convenience.

Great quality doesn't have to wait.

Why would you go to a supermarket in the mornings when you can just squeeze an egg.

Squeeze one today.

That's gross.

Virgil
May 19th, 2015, 09:24
I didn't think Fukuoka had a Costco. If they do, then it has been opened within my time here.

naginataonthebrain
May 19th, 2015, 09:38
I didn't think Fukuoka had a Costco. If they do, then it has been opened within my time here.

There is indeed a Costco in Fukuoka. The reason I know that is because it's the closest one to Miyazaki (been researching like crazy since I found out that I'm going to be furnishing an empty apartment).

Jiggit
May 19th, 2015, 09:51
Japanese people are nuts for eggs. When I was actually still trying to be a nice person, I had my Eikaiwa prepare information about useful services and such around the area for the new ALT. Basically 80% of them came back with some kind of deals or special days in which you could get free or extra eggs thrown in.

haitch40
May 19th, 2015, 10:04
But I WOULD request a Five Guy's burger
What are Five Guys like? They recently opened up a shop over here and I haven't had a chance to try them yet.

Virgil
May 19th, 2015, 10:14
Eggs and corn apparently. What is the deal with corn?

AyaReiko
May 19th, 2015, 10:22
Eggs and corn and mayo.... Oh my.

BifCarbet
May 19th, 2015, 10:33
Eggs and corn and mayo.... Oh my.

One of my favorites. I can't wait to get back to Japan. Really good eggs and corn and mayo restaurant in NakaMeguro.

Ananasboat
May 19th, 2015, 11:25
What are Five Guys like? They recently opened up a shop over here and I haven't had a chance to try them yet.

It's really good. I mean, I don't know what your standards are for burger joints, or even if the 5Gs that's in the US is the same as the 5Gs you have in the UK. But, normal sized burgers with as many toppings as you want. Peanut shells everywhere. Massive servings of fries. Seriously go for the small if you're alone. Don't make that mistake.

Gizmotech
May 19th, 2015, 11:47
As for waffle irons, if you can get to a don quiote they often have a few.

Fantasylife
May 19th, 2015, 12:25
As for waffle irons, if you can get to a don quiote they often have a few.

I'm having mines shipped with my winter clothing. I don't eat waffles all the time, but every once in a while I get a crazy craving for them.

webstaa
May 19th, 2015, 12:34
I'm having mines shipped with my winter clothing. I don't eat waffles all the time, but every once in a while I get a crazy craving for them.

Waffle irons are pretty common in stores, but they're usually the pretty deep/small serving size. If you like lots of small divots over few big ones (or if that matters to you at all) you might want to bring one. I don't eat waffles more than once every 2-3 months... And over the last 2ish years I've had pancakes exactly once.

taysukidesu
May 19th, 2015, 13:18
Huevos Rancheros at the hole-in-the-wall Mexican joint down the road from my house.

Frap
May 19th, 2015, 14:51
It's really good. I mean, I don't know what your standards are for burger joints, or even if the 5Gs that's in the US is the same as the 5Gs you have in the UK. But, normal sized burgers with as many toppings as you want. Peanut shells everywhere. Massive servings of fries. Seriously go for the small if you're alone. Don't make that mistake.

Don't forget the drink machines with the 100 flava flaves!

Ananasboat
May 19th, 2015, 15:10
Don't forget the drink machines with out 100 flava flaves!

Oh my god how could I forget!! It's always a 10 minutes battle between grape or peach sprite.

acpc2203
May 20th, 2015, 04:55
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwGn7085gZo
This

Zolrak 22
May 20th, 2015, 10:00
Oh my god how could I forget!! It's always a 10 minutes battle between grape or peach sprite.
You don't mix and match flavors?

BarnSwallow
May 22nd, 2015, 06:16
Definitely considering poutine as my last meal... haha

BifCarbet
May 22nd, 2015, 06:25
Coco's in Japan has had poutine on the menu before. So good. Very authentic.

JK it was gross.

BarnSwallow
May 22nd, 2015, 08:58
I can just imagine the cheese curds going horribly wrong. :(

There are even some places in Toronto that do poutine wrong. I got shredded cheese over gravy and fries once and it was called "poutine". Who are they trying to fool?! Anyway.. yeah. Curds are important!

Virgil
May 22nd, 2015, 09:01
I can just imagine the cheese curds going horribly wrong. :(

There are even some places in Toronto that do poutine wrong. I got shredded cheese over gravy and fries once and it was called "poutine". Who are they trying to fool?! Anyway.. yeah. Curds are important!

I've been meaning to make some cheese/curds. Maybe I'll make poutine...

Jiggit
May 22nd, 2015, 10:22
Coco's in Japan has had poutine on the menu before. So good. Very authentic.

JK it was gross.

I swear it's a government policy. Make gaijin foods, but make them in such a wrong and gross way that nobody will like them so no-one will want to go abroad.

Virgil
May 22nd, 2015, 10:32
I swear it's a government policy. Make gaijin foods, but make them in such a wrong and gross way that nobody will like them so no-one will want to go abroad.

There's a beer bar down the road from me that actually makes pretty solid tacos. They don't taste like Mexican food, but they taste good.

naginataonthebrain
May 22nd, 2015, 12:20
I think I might be the only one who is going to be okay living without good Mexican food. I was never really into tacos or enchiladas anyway. However, I *will* miss having access to delicious guacamole. Avocados, y u so karai in Nippon?

Virgil
May 22nd, 2015, 12:23
I think I might be the only one who is going to be okay living without good Mexican food. I was never really into tacos or enchiladas anyway. However, I *will* miss having access to delicious guacamole. Avocados, y u so karai in Nippon?

Avacados are easily accessible in my Japan.

I'm going to invoke the no true scotsman fallacy here and say that most people have not tried "real" tacos. Seriously though. I love me a good taco.

If you're imagining a crunchy shell then you just need to stop.

naginataonthebrain
May 22nd, 2015, 12:29
Accessible? Most likely. But buying them without paying an arm and a leg for it? Unlikely.

But yeah, even when I worked at a Spanish-immersion camp, a place where they cooked authentic Spanish meals (none of that frozen hot dog and fries shit), I was not a fan of the enchiladas or tacos. However, we had some banging desserts though...like homemade alfajores (shortbread cookies with dulce de ledche and coconut all over it). Oh man, now I really want some.

Jiggit
May 22nd, 2015, 12:32
authentic Spanish meals

enchiladas or tacos

Ah, you mean like that authentic Muslim turban you wear?

Zolrak 22
May 22nd, 2015, 12:48
I hope you try these some day.

http://www.elcolmadito.com/Arte/MasProductos/DulcedeLeche_1.jpg
http://www.elcolmadito.com/Arte/MasProductos/DulzuraBorincanaDulcedeCoco_1.jpg

And arroz con Leche.


Should I ever become an ALT, I'd like to bring traditional sweets as gifts.

They were a hoot in other states.

Virgil
May 22nd, 2015, 13:00
I hope you try these some day.

http://www.elcolmadito.com/Arte/MasProductos/DulcedeLeche_1.jpg
http://www.elcolmadito.com/Arte/MasProductos/DulzuraBorincanaDulcedeCoco_1.jpg

And arroz con Leche.


Should I ever become an ALT, I'd like to bring traditional sweets as gifts.

They were a hoot in other states.

I almost brought a variety of Mexican sweets from back home. Then I decided I wasn't brown enough.

webstaa
May 25th, 2015, 08:21
I hope you try these some day.

http://www.elcolmadito.com/Arte/MasProductos/DulcedeLeche_1.jpg
http://www.elcolmadito.com/Arte/MasProductos/DulzuraBorincanaDulcedeCoco_1.jpg

And arroz con Leche.


Should I ever become an ALT, I'd like to bring traditional sweets as gifts.

They were a hoot in other states.

DO IT. If you bring omiyage, bring shit that people haven't seen/tasted before. You'll learn who the real 'adventurous' folks are. I brought cactus candy after a trip to AZ. Found out 1/3 of my teachers were weirded out by candy made from (edible) cactus. The other 2/3 actually liked it.

Gizmotech
May 25th, 2015, 08:32
Or as has been mentioned several hundred times, you could just not bring anything. That works as well.

Zolrak 22
May 25th, 2015, 11:38
Or as has been mentioned several hundred times, you could just not bring anything. That works as well.

In my case, it's for selfish reasons.

If no one eats it, I'll just take them myself. [emoji14]

Frap
May 25th, 2015, 20:32
My mum's cooking!

Shincantsen
May 27th, 2015, 00:21
I actually found avocados were pretty reasonably priced in my Japan when they were in season. Similar to the pricing I see in the US, at least.

weepinbell
May 29th, 2015, 09:20
How true is the melon thing? I'm eating such good cantaloupe right nooooww....

Ananasboat
May 29th, 2015, 10:12
How true is the melon thing? I'm eating such good cantaloupe right nooooww....

It varies depending on size, time of year, flavor and aesthetic appeal. I've seen melons over $100, and $70 mangos, and $50 boxes of strawberries. It's nuts.

That said, at my local supermarket they are selling smaller melons for like, $9. I can get a dozen strawberries for $3. Fruit here is typically smaller than foreign counterparts, and slightly more expensive, but you can totally avoid paying outrageous prices for fruit.

Ebi
May 29th, 2015, 17:42
It varies depending on size, time of year, flavor and aesthetic appeal. I've seen melons over $100, and $70 mangos, and $50 boxes of strawberries. It's nuts.

That said, at my local supermarket they are selling smaller melons for like, $9. I can get a dozen strawberries for $3. Fruit here is typically smaller than foreign counterparts, and slightly more expensive, but you can totally avoid paying outrageous prices for fruit.
I just had a 5,000 yen mango the other night! And we have a melon sitting around that we need to eat soon. I'm assuming it cost at least 1,500 yen since it's a decent size for two people. Both were gifts from my in-laws since I'm not willing to spend that kind of money on fruit. Dekopon are my kryptonite though... I try to buy as many as I can when they're in season even though they're usually over 150 yen a pop in my area.

Saga
May 30th, 2015, 02:48
I am suddenly so glad I'm going to Ehime. Hopefully at least the mikan will be inexpensive! I'd never heard of dekopon, but they look tasty.

I can't imagine a 5000 yen mango. Is it super special or shaped like a cube or something?

Virgil
May 30th, 2015, 03:27
I get such huge bags of mikan for basically nothing.

Elysi
May 30th, 2015, 04:31
Well I've ruled out Mexican for my last meal, at least not the same day I'll be flying. So trying to decide if I want pizza or to look for a place that has the best macaroni and cheese in Denver. Probably going to go for the mac and cheese.

For fruits, I'm only really big on strawberries and grapes. So I probably won't have to worry about splurging on expensive melons. Not sure how common it is elsewhere, but Shizuoka has all you can eat strawberry picking places. Although I'll have to wait til next year to go, this makes me extremely happy. Trying to get my fill now to hold me over til then.

Shincantsen
May 30th, 2015, 04:54
I mean, fruit is expensive in Japan, but it's not like "only the 1%" expensive. Those $50 watermelons or mangos or whatever aren't normal fruit, they're gift fruit, which has been carefully selected to be the best of the best and meant to be given as gifts. Regular fruit is just a marginally more expensive grocery item. You probably won't be making yourself fruit salad every day, but if you want to buy some strawberries or a watermelon, I promise that you will be able to afford them on your salary.

blackxpetals
May 30th, 2015, 05:21
How much are fruit approximately? Especially berries. In Australia, a small punnet of blueberries/raspberries can be up to $9. I don't think I'll be willing to pay any more than that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ananasboat
May 30th, 2015, 10:03
How much are fruit approximately? Especially berries. In Australia, a small punnet of blueberries/raspberries can be up to $9. I don't think I'll be willing to pay any more than that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I can't say I've seen fresh blueberries or raspberries in my area. So, maybe you won't have to worry about it?

I'm growing my own blueberries, so they're kind of free for me.

blackxpetals
May 30th, 2015, 16:15
I can't say I've seen fresh blueberries or raspberries in my area. So, maybe you won't have to worry about it?

I'm growing my own blueberries, so they're kind of free for me.

I'm heading into Tokyo, so I hope there'll be an abundance of different fruit and veggies to choose from.

It's awesome that you're growing your own blueberries!! Are you doing it from a small pot or do you have an actual garden. I'd love to do something like that when I arrive.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Ananasboat
May 30th, 2015, 17:45
I've got three blueberry plants in pots. Blueberries seem to favor them, although obviously growing them in the ground isn't impossible. The other part is that my backyard is all rocks. And under those rocks is a weed tarp. Though that doesn't stop the weeds. Haha

I have a medium sized planter as well, with two kinds of mint, oregano and lemon balm. Planters are the safest way to grow mint otherwise your entire garden will be covered in mint in a few years. I walked by me neighbor's house the other day and I saw that he had planted two mint plants on the edge of his yard. I will feel bad for him when the mint tries to take over his entire garden.

moonbeam
May 31st, 2015, 00:38
Is fruit available year round, or do we have to wait for it to be in-season?

sourdoughsushi
May 31st, 2015, 04:09
Blueberries are available in small quantities and kind of low quality here, but it can be fairly expensive in comparison. I think I've given up on hoping for raspberries. Hell, there aren't even frozen raspberries in my town. :(

Ebi
May 31st, 2015, 08:00
Is fruit available year round, or do we have to wait for it to be in-season?
Depends on the fruit. Things like bananas are available year-round more or less with prices fluctuating a bit. Very seasonal fruit like persimmons are definitely only available while in-season. Some other fruits (e.g. strawberries) might be available out of season, but cost more.

webstaa
June 1st, 2015, 08:39
Look for fruit that's local. There are apple orchards, blueberry and strawberry farms, and a nashi orchard or two in my town (in Tohoku.) If you go to Yamagata, there will be cherries. There's a town or two in Miyagi near Matsushima and Sendai that specialized in nashi.

If you go to the farmers market or the store at the 道の駅 (michinoeki) the fruit is pretty aggressively priced. Then again, the supermarket in the town also has pretty cheap fruit on occasion, too. Kiwis 4/200 yen, 600, 800, and 1000 melons, mikans by the box, apples (and two varieties at that!) They price their bananas by un-ripeness. The less ripe, the more expensive.

Usually there are apples, melons, lemons, mikan, and bananas year round with little price fluctuation. Everything else gets kinda pricey out of season (kiwis go from 4/200 yen to 200 yen per kiwi, etc.)

blik
June 1st, 2015, 18:09
Being a first-gen immigrant from the Balkans and having grown up in a ridiculously Balkan household, my last meal at home will probably be a very comforting fresh cheese, cured meats, and homemade bread, sour cherry pastries for dessert, rounded off by a toast with my grandparents' nice, strong plum brandy. Last meal with friends will probably be poutine or pizza.

Shincantsen
June 1st, 2015, 23:47
Oh man, yeah. It is important that all of you stuff yourselves with stinky, sharp cheeses and sourdough bread before you go.

naginataonthebrain
June 2nd, 2015, 05:51
http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m397h3iAvS1qes94xo2_1280.jpg

Ananasboat
June 2nd, 2015, 08:13
Oh man, yeah. It is important that all of you stuff yourselves with stinky, sharp cheeses and sourdough bread before you go.

A friend has a bread maker. I know how to make sourdough. I'm considering leasing the bread maker sometime in the next couple of weeks. Haha

haitch40
June 2nd, 2015, 08:21
A friend has a bread maker. I know how to make sourdough. I'm considering leasing the bread maker sometime in the next couple of weeks. Haha
My parents bought a bread maker a few years ago. They are brilliant.

acpc2203
June 2nd, 2015, 12:54
Did they ever figure out how to make good sourdough outside the bay area? I remember there being a kind of bacteria that is only in that area being the reason for their superior sourdough.

singinglupines
June 3rd, 2015, 03:42
My dad has a bread maker and has had four over the past 20 years. He's German and can't stand American bread so I've only ever had homemade bread. His sourdough is great. I'm think of getting a bread maker in Japan as his current machine is Japanese and works wonderfully.

webstaa
June 3rd, 2015, 08:19
Breadmakers are nice, but I'd rather have a stand mixer and a real oven instead. Probably because I don't make or like to make square/sandwich breads.

Although my shitty little micro-oven works decent for pizza as long as you preheat the stone.

Gizmotech
June 3rd, 2015, 08:28
Breadmakers are nice, but I'd rather have a stand mixer and a real oven instead. Probably because I don't make or like to make square/sandwich breads.

Although my shitty little micro-oven works decent for pizza as long as you preheat the stone.

Word. Though maybe not on the mixer... not that needed really. But a proper food processor would be nice.

The oven though... GOD I WANT AN OVEN.

Ananasboat
June 3rd, 2015, 09:51
I've been thinking of popping over to Komeri and buying myself a slow cooker. Dunno where I'm going to put it, but I was actual meals without cooking them after I get home. That would be awesome. I'll probably buy one online if they don't stock them though.

Oh man, I can't wait to have a real kitchen.

Gizmotech
June 3rd, 2015, 10:48
I've been thinking of popping over to Komeri and buying myself a slow cooker. Dunno where I'm going to put it, but I was actual meals without cooking them after I get home. That would be awesome. I'll probably buy one online if they don't stock them though.

Oh man, I can't wait to have a real kitchen.

Do you have a K's denki, yamada, or yoshida near by? They'll have the 7000yen slow cooker which is great.

Verbatim
June 10th, 2015, 02:17
I have this ah-mazing countertop oven from Breville that can cook a pizza as well as bake cookies etc. It one of those expensive stainless steel ones and does a damn fine job with just about any type of food. I really wish I could bring it, but it's pretty hefty. However, I think it would come in handy for all the things I wanna bake.

ambrosse
June 11th, 2015, 13:00
I will definitely want to splurge at some point on a microwave convection oven in Japan so I can bake :D

Shincantsen
June 12th, 2015, 00:05
Maybe some of you have already tried/known this, but I used a toaster oven in Japan for all my cooking. I made biscuits, cookies, roasted veggies, even a pecan pie in it, and it was completely affordable (maybe 5,000 yen for a nice one). I highly recommend it.

vaterross
June 12th, 2015, 13:17
It's definitely worth the splurge for a nice toaster oven, preferably convection. I went a year without one and getting it really opened up my cooking options.

And bread machines are unnecessary, especially as you probably won't have the extra counter space to waste on a unitasker (guess who my cooking god is). Spend a few weeks playing around with dough recipes, or even better do it by weight and use ratios.

Basic Dough
5 parts flour
3 parts water
2% salt
1% yeast
mix and knead until you pass the windowpane test
cover and put in the fridge for a few days
bring to room temp and bake it (or make sweet flatbread in a pan)