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weepinbell
October 28th, 2015, 08:55
This isn't anything immediate, I'm just kinda curious if anyone has done it here. I'm thinking about going to grad school when I get back, but I also want to get my teaching certificate, which I know is something I could at least start online. Starting a grad program while still abroad seems a little too ambitious, but maybe a teaching certificate wouldn't be as bad? Anyone do it simultaneously with JET?

Also, has anyone successfully continued ESL (specifically in the states) at elementary or secondary levels? I've been researching a bit and of course it seems like they prefer bilingual Spanish speakers.

uthinkimlost?
October 28th, 2015, 09:26
This isn't anything immediate, I'm just kinda curious if anyone has done it here. I'm thinking about going to grad school when I get back, but I also want to get my teaching certificate, which I know is something I could at least start online. Starting a grad program while still abroad seems a little too ambitious, but maybe a teaching certificate wouldn't be as bad? Anyone do it simultaneously with JET?

Also, has anyone successfully continued ESL (specifically in the states) at elementary or secondary levels? I've been researching a bit and of course it seems like they prefer bilingual Spanish speakers.

Teaching certificates will usually require a practicum and extra coursework, many of which end in a masters. (There are 1-2 alternative paths that make exceptions.) The practicum usually has to be stateside. Each state has its own rules, so you need to research ALL of them.

Lots of JETs do Master's while on JET. (Those with loads of free time would breeze through, I imagine.)

My teacher friends have told me that the states are desperate for ESL teachers, bilingual or not. That said, for a lot of states they require some heavy duty coursework to get the cert, and an additional practicum.

It is also a much different world there, from what I understand. (Don't expect what you learn here to apply to public school ESL, basically.)

webstaa
October 28th, 2015, 10:29
There are some ESL for Japanese speakers in the States. They pop up occasionally on jetwit. But they're few and far between. I think most of the ESL skills you learn as an ALT will help in the States if you want that pursue that.

I know I want to go back to school after I leave the JET Program - seeing as my degree is pretty close to worthless outside a tiny sector. Don't know if I'll go for another BA or apply for a Masters program - my degree is in the humanities, I'd probably pursue a degree in comp sci.

weepinbell
October 28th, 2015, 11:28
It doesn't need to be focused on Japanese speakers, I mostly just don't want my lacking ability in Spanish to be an issue!

I'm looking at Temple U right now since it's an American institution with a TESOL master's program and a campus super close to me, so depending on when I want to leave Japan, it'd make things easier to finish up back in the states... However, I'm having a bit of trouble understanding how TESOL master's and certificates work. I have yet to find a program that also works towards a teaching license (save for Bilingual Ed.), and it seems like that's necessary if you want to teach ESL in K-12, right? So then you'd have to earn your license separately... however, I'm assuming with a master's in TESOL, it'd suffice as your ESL endorsement? I feel like a picked the most complicated interest in the education field haha.

Also, unrelated to all of that, I know I can do my GRE here, but has anyone who's taken it have some input on that? I'm not an amazing standardized test-taker. Math is a huge weak-point for me... I always do well in English/writing, but will potentially shitting all over one section still f my chances of pursuing a Master's?

uthinkimlost?
October 28th, 2015, 11:45
However, I'm having a bit of trouble understanding how TESOL master's and certificates work. I have yet to find a program that also works towards a teaching license (save for Bilingual Ed.), and it seems like that's necessary if you want to teach ESL in K-12, right? So then you'd have to earn your license separately... however, I'm assuming with a master's in TESOL, it'd suffice as your ESL endorsement? I feel like a picked the most complicated interest in the education field haha.

Also, unrelated to all of that, I know I can do my GRE here, but has anyone who's taken it have some input on that? I'm not an amazing standardized test-taker. Math is a huge weak-point for me... I always do well in English/writing, but will potentially shitting all over one section still f my chances of pursuing a Master's?

Again, it will vary GREATLY state-by-state if you want to teach K-12. Licensure requirements just aren't standardized. You might be fully licensed in Alabama, but Oklahoma thinks you need to take more classes. It might help if you mentioned the potential state(s). Your TESOL masters will certainly help, but you are still likely to have deficits that the BoEs expect you to make up. (Some of them will give you provisional licenses that let you work a year or two while you make it up.) Most have licensing exams for these things, here is Massachussetts' example:

General requirements for a real license. (http://www.mass.gov/edu/government/departments-and-boards/ese/programs/educator-effectiveness/licensure/)

The test itself. (http://www.mtel.nesinc.com/PDFs/MA_FLD054_PRACTICE_TEST.pdf)


Are you going to quit JET to go to school, or do them at the same time? I don't recall if TUJ has an online option or not.

No secret to the GRE/other tests. Take the practice tests they have online, practice where you're weak.

Saga
October 28th, 2015, 11:57
I want to get my teaching license too, but for secondary education in Minnesota that requires you to get a master's degree, and included a one year practicum. Plus my work load right now is actually really heavy, and I wouldn't have time to do an online program anyways. So, I'm waiting to get back to the US before I go back to school.

As for how TESOL and how that works in relation to a teaching certificate, it really depends on the state. Maybe contact Temple University and ask them?

weepinbell
October 28th, 2015, 12:14
Again, it will vary GREATLY state-by-state if you want to teach K-12. Licensure requirements just aren't standardized. You might be fully licensed in Alabama, but Oklahoma thinks you need to take more classes. It might help if you mentioned the potential state(s). Your TESOL masters will certainly help, but you are still likely to have deficits that the BoEs expect you to make up. (Some of them will give you provisional licenses that let you work a year or two while you make it up.) Most have licensing exams for these things, here is Massachussetts' example:

General requirements for a real license. (http://www.mass.gov/edu/government/departments-and-boards/ese/programs/educator-effectiveness/licensure/)

The test itself. (http://www.mtel.nesinc.com/PDFs/MA_FLD054_PRACTICE_TEST.pdf)


Are you going to quit JET to go to school, or do them at the same time? I don't recall if TUJ has an online option or not.

No secret to the GRE/other tests. Take the practice tests they have online, practice where you're weak.

Right, I know it varies, but every Master's for it I've checked out regardless of state doesn't offer any type of license program with it. And most online programs are just for endorsements on top of a pre-existing license. I'm probably going for Illinois, but the only dual-license/master's I've found there is for Bilingual Ed., which is focused on teaching in Spanish/English.

Oh no, definitely not quitting JET. This is something I'm considering doing Fall of 2016 or 2017 on top of JET, depending how long I stay. The Temple program is designed for people who are working, so they have night classes. Campus is only a 30min train ride from me and I honestly am not slammed with work here, so I figured it's something to look into, though it's really expensive without aid.

Good to know about the provisional license, that's something I'll research more, thanks.

Haha, definitely not looking for any secrets! I'm just curious about what Education programs generally look into... your total score, how well you did on relevant sections? I'm just not quite sure how it works, though I guess it'd vary by school. It's not like I'm applying for Harvard or anything, but still, my math deficiency is something I've never been able to fix no matter how much I study... there's a reason I'm looking to go into the total opposite field...

Gizmotech
October 28th, 2015, 12:24
Just a big thing, at least in Canada not all university tesol masters are equal. Only two universities in the country actually counted as in service teacher train in certification for tesol , as the rest were very academically focused applied linguistics programs.

uthinkimlost?
October 28th, 2015, 12:56
Right, I know it varies, but every Master's for it I've checked out regardless of state doesn't offer any type of license program with it. And most online programs are just for endorsements on top of a pre-existing license. I'm probably going for Illinois, but the only dual-license/master's I've found there is for Bilingual Ed., which is focused on teaching in Spanish/English.

If teaching is your end-goal, I'd do a M.Ed. then do the ESL stuff later. It'll bump your pay and teach you to teach, which, as Giz pointed out, is not guaranteed in a TESOL programme.. You can always add additional endorsements later.

weepinbell
October 28th, 2015, 13:36
If teaching is your end-goal, I'd do a M.Ed. then do the ESL stuff later. It'll bump your pay and teach you to teach, which, as Giz pointed out, is not guaranteed in a TESOL programme.. You can always add additional endorsements later.

Yeah, I'm only looking into M.Ed's as it is, but it seems like no TESOL M.Ed's offer initial license along with it... looks like maybe they're more geared towards people wanting to teach at universities, adult learners, etc. My dilemma is whether I go for a Master's of Teaching with initial license then do an ESL endorsement or a TESOL Master's (which works in place of ESL endorsements) and then do an alternative certification program for a license. Seems like I'll have to do a 2-step either way at this point.

Zolrak 22
October 28th, 2015, 13:37
(I know it's unhelpful but)

I'd appreciate it if you learn Spanish, corazón. [emoji14]

weepinbell
October 28th, 2015, 13:45
(I know it's unhelpful but)

I'd appreciate it if you learn Spanish, corazón. [emoji14]

Took Spanish in high school, the only things I retained were 'donde esta la biblioteca' and 'mantequilla de cacahuete'.

Zolrak 22
October 28th, 2015, 14:45
Who the heck uses cacahuetes? Just say maní.

La biblioteca esta en la parte de atrás de la escuela. Siempre está vacía porque nadie la usa.

Jiggit
October 28th, 2015, 15:44
Voila mon Passport.

Ananasboat
October 28th, 2015, 19:15
Hai, dozo amigo.

Jiggit
October 29th, 2015, 08:20
jajajajaja

Gizmotech
October 29th, 2015, 08:38
Soo back to topic.

When I was looking a few years ago, I never saw a program in Canada (or eastern US) that both gave the B.Ed certificate and the ESL certification at the same time. In basically every case I saw, the ESL certification was an after B.Ed thing either as a MA Ling/ESL or CELTA equivalency acceptance.

weepinbell
October 29th, 2015, 10:03
Is it a little different in Canada? For the US, I think the most important part is getting your specific state teaching license if you wanna do anything within K-12. You can do that through a post-BA licensure program or get it with a MA in Teaching. Then you have to do the ESL credential, sorta like you're saying. Honestly, it's the licensure thing that's frustrating me at this point, because to teach secondary schools you HAVE to get your license in a core subject - that's why I'd almost rather do a TESOL B.Ed and get the license through a certificate-only program. If I did the MA in Teaching/license, it's license credit hours + MA credit hours, anyway, so it ends up being appx the same credit hours as B.Ed + teaching cert. separately. I'd kinda rather spend 2 years getting my Master's in TESOL since that's what I really am interested in, and not like English/Lit. I already suffered through Grendal and Great Expectations in high school...

Also, tbh if I could potentially get into the TUJ program for an M.Ed, it could be more of an edge than an online MA/licensure... but that also depends a lot on $$$...