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Torinn88
February 3rd, 2016, 20:04
In an attempt to overcome the lower-intermediate hurdle I've been thinking about how to approach Japanese as a means of studying something else. For example: a history book designed for 3rd/4th year elementary school students, taking cooking courses at ABC cooking... The draw back is there might be a lot of subject specific patterns, vocabulary, etc. that might not have any function in real conversations.

Has anyone here used a similar approach?

GodInStrafeMode
February 4th, 2016, 09:53
I studied Korean in Japanese and for the most part it actually improved my Japanese.

Jiggit
February 4th, 2016, 10:02
How about your Korean?

GodInStrafeMode
February 4th, 2016, 10:15
How about your Korean?

She's fine thank you ;) Seriously though, my Korean was a tonne better when I used to go there for work on the regular.

acpc2203
February 4th, 2016, 13:49
I've wanted to learn Korean so I could fit in at the shady Korean bars back home, though I also want to fit in at the shady Chinese and Japanese bars there as well.

Ebi
February 5th, 2016, 01:29
I highly recommend learning something new using Japanese. I learned how to cook using almost exclusively Japanese: i helped my MIL in the kitchen, I watched cooking programs on TV, I bought several beginners cook books and cooking guides, and I read online recipes and guides. As a result, I feel more comfortable using Japanese words for measurements and ingredients most of the time.

Downside: learning can be slow and frustrating at the start if your vocabulary is really limited
Plus-side: you will naturally expand your vocabulary and learn how to use words in context, making them easier to retain; regardless of the content, your Japanese will improve if you regularly consume comprehensible input and produce comprehensible output

If a topic interests you, motivates you, and isn't insanely complicated, then I think it's a good idea.