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JPNLKatie
April 2nd, 2016, 04:13
This question is mostly directed toward current and past JETs, but anyone can answer if they'd like:

Exactly how much stuff did you take with you when you moved to Japan? And I don't mean this is terms of lists on what things you should/should not bring, but in terms of actual volume. For example, you took 1 carry on bag, and two 28" suitcases full of stuff and bought the rest in Japan. Or you brought 1 carry on, and 1 large suitcase, and had two boxes shipped over with stuff.

I'm trying to figure out the best and most economical way to get the stuff I need to my apartment in Japan. I know bringing the least amount possible is best, but if I can save money by bringing something along that I already own over having to buy a replacement in Japan, then I want to do that. I have pretty limited funds. I have saved about $2000 so far for startup costs for JET, and I want to use it frugally. I also have to keep in mind that possibly $500 of that fund will be used to buy suitcases, clothes, and omiyage prior to leaving for Japan.

So, what I want to know is how many bags of stuff did you take with you when you moved to Japan? How much stuff did you have shipped? How much did it cost, in terms of purchase cost of the suitcases, luggage fees at the airport, and/or shipping costs? Is there anything you would have done differently if you could?

Thank you in advance.

simplesam
April 2nd, 2016, 05:18
This question is mostly directed toward current and past JETs, but anyone can answer if they'd like:

Exactly how much stuff did you take with you when you moved to Japan? And I don't mean this is terms of lists on what things you should/should not bring, but in terms of actual volume. For example, you took 1 carry on bag, and two 28" suitcases full of stuff and bought the rest in Japan. Or you brought 1 carry on, and 1 large suitcase, and had two boxes shipped over with stuff.

I'm trying to figure out the best and most economical way to get the stuff I need to my apartment in Japan. I know bringing the least amount possible is best, but if I can save money by bringing something along that I already own over having to buy a replacement in Japan, then I want to do that. I have pretty limited funds. I have saved about $2000 so far for startup costs for JET, and I want to use it frugally. I also have to keep in mind that possibly $500 of that fund will be used to buy suitcases, clothes, and omiyage prior to leaving for Japan.

So, what I want to know is how many bags of stuff did you take with you when you moved to Japan? How much stuff did you have shipped? How much did it cost, in terms of purchase cost of the suitcases, luggage fees at the airport, and/or shipping costs? Is there anything you would have done differently if you could?

Thank you in advance.

Can I follow this up with a second question? Besides everything else mentioned (which is stuff I've thought about), is there a service like Cube-It (CUBE IT! オーストラリアから日本への荷物、スーツケース、ゴルフバッグはキューブの格安航空宅配で (http://www.cubeit.com.au/cubeit/) in case you've never seen it) for the US? It seems pretty remarkable and I hear the Australian JETs rave about it all the time. Most of the international box shipping companies tend to be restricted to the other hemisphere, though... :/

JPNLKatie
April 2nd, 2016, 08:58
I'm not exactly sure what cube it is, but it looks to be a service that ships to Japan for a flat rate based on what can fit it a box. I know our United States Postal Service (USPS) has flat rate boxes too but I think they only ship nationally. Cube it seems pretty nice, I'm jealous.

simplesam
April 2nd, 2016, 10:17
It's not just that. Cube It will ship up to cargo crates worth of things. You can basically UHaul yourself to Japan with it (might be a slight exaggeration, but still...). I was wondering if there was something like that for America? Maybe that would have been useful for your purposes?

JPNLKatie
April 2nd, 2016, 11:20
I don't know. If there is, I don't know of it.

Zolrak 22
April 2nd, 2016, 14:52
Katie, I don't mean to sound negative, but if you can try to save up another $1000 or at the very least another $500.

You really don't wanna rely on only $1500, unless you know for sure you won't spend as much on rent and other amenities on the first month.

(If possible, try selling some of the things you won't need in Japan, or those you can easily replace in a few months when the pay's savings start coming in)

Sometimes they can lend you money or give you an advanced but this is not a guarantee and you'll be at the mercy of whoever wants to help you.

moonbeam
April 2nd, 2016, 16:49
Wait until you talk to your predecessor, they'll be able to tell you what you need. And if they're competent adults like mine was then everything in your apartment will be in good shape and you won't need as much. You'll also get a better idea for start up costs. I only had to bring about $700 with me (and that got me to pay day).

As for luggage, I brought my two suitcases and carry on. I didn't bring any omiyage.

hypatia
April 2nd, 2016, 18:20
Two full-sized suitcases (Exactly at that 50lb cut off, haha), rolling carry-on suitcase and backpack. The only thing I had mailed from home was my winter clothes, and since we arrive in summer there was no rush for that.

As others have posted, it's likely that you'll be moving into an apartment where you pred(s!) has been living, so don't worry about buying too much. My pred was the first in this particular apartment and didn't buy a ton as far as furniture, but the basics were here and I've been able to slowly furnish it over time.

As far as buying stuff for Japan, unless it will be difficult to find things in your size (shoes, clothes, bras, etc), Japan has pretty much anything that you might need from home, unless you are really sold on using a particular brand of something. I didn't bring omiyage. I teach at too many schools, and they don't really expect it from you. If you feel it's really necessary then you can talk to your pred to get more info, but just bring small, cheap, individually packaged snacks. You don't have to drop a lot of dough (really).

Gizmotech
April 3rd, 2016, 02:22
A) Shipping stuff will always be more expensive if you can't move a 1/8 container
B) Most of the stuff you think you will need you won't.
C) The rest of the stuff you also think you will need you won't.
D) The last hold out group you're thinking of right now, including binky the bear, you won't need
E) Honestly, wait until you hear from your pred (if you have one) before planning to ship a bunch of crap.

I wasted 300$ shipping over a bunch of stuff I never used, and I also brought a bunch of crap I never used because my life changed DRASTICALLY when I arrived.

JPNLKatie
April 3rd, 2016, 22:53
Thanks for your help everyone. Quick question though. Does anyone know what size, "standard check-in luggage" is? Is it 28" or 30"?

word
April 4th, 2016, 00:58
A) Shipping stuff will always be more expensive if you can't move a 1/8 container
B) Most of the stuff you think you will need you won't.
C) The rest of the stuff you also think you will need you won't.
D) The last hold out group you're thinking of right now, including binky the bear, you won't need
E) Honestly, wait until you hear from your pred (if you have one) before planning to ship a bunch of crap.

I wasted 300$ shipping over a bunch of stuff I never used, and I also brought a bunch of crap I never used because my life changed DRASTICALLY when I arrived.word


Thanks for your help everyone. Quick question though. Does anyone know what size, "standard check-in luggage" is? Is it 28" or 30"?Totally meaningless; focus on weight, not volume; that's gonna be your real limiting factor.

Edit: Unless you're doing something weird. If you're doing something weird, your situation may be different from the vast majority of other JETs with whom you're traveling.

hypatia
April 4th, 2016, 00:59
Thanks for your help everyone. Quick question though. Does anyone know what size, "standard check-in luggage" is? Is it 28" or 30"?

Guidelines vary depending on which airline you fly (which can be found by googling "checked baggage" plus your airline. A cursory glance shows that most guidelines give a size that the total dimensions shouldn't exceed anyhow rather that a set maximum height ) Unless you need to buy the luggage right now, you'll find out relevant info (like which airline you'll probably be flying with and packing recommendations) from the JET Coordinator at your consulate.

TL;DR - You just found out you were shortlisted. You don't even know where you're going yet, haven't talked to your pred, and haven't gotten any info from your coordinator. Slow your roll. Enjoy the excitement while it lasts. Also, perhaps consult Google occasionally for easily answered questions.

hypatia
April 4th, 2016, 01:01
word

Totally meaningless; focus on weight, not volume; that's gonna be your real limiting factor.

Yeah this, 100%

(although based on her first post about needing to buy luggage, I'm assuming that she's asking for that reason)

the4ork
April 4th, 2016, 05:21
"When you arrive in Japan, you will be greeted in the arrival lobby by travel agency representatives. You will then be directed to a shipping area where luggage can be sent to your contracting organisation. Please note, you
may only be permitted to take one large piece of luggage (suitcase or rucksack) and one hand-held carry-on with
you to the Post-Arrival Orientation venue."

"From the airport, each JET participant is only allowed to bring one large suitcase or rucksack and one
carry-on to the Post-Arrival Orientation venue. This is due to space limitations and is strictly enforced at
the airport. From the airport to the hotel, you can also take a laptop computer, but you will have to hold it
on your lap with your carry-on. The remainder of your baggage will be sent from the airport to your
contracting organisation using a prearranged domestic delivery company.* The cost of this service will
vary depending on the size, weight and destination of each piece of baggage. Excessively large/heavy
pieces of baggage may incur extra charges. One piece of baggage costs approximately 2,500-5,000 yen
and takes 3-5 days to deliver. There are times when you receive your baggage after you have arrived at
your contracting organisation. For this reason, please pack necessary items for an extra two days in your
carry-on."




Am I the only one who read the GI Handbook?

JPNLKatie
April 4th, 2016, 05:50
"When you arrive in Japan, you will be greeted in the arrival lobby by travel agency representatives. You will then be directed to a shipping area where luggage can be sent to your contracting organisation. Please note, you
may only be permitted to take one large piece of luggage (suitcase or rucksack) and one hand-held carry-on with
you to the Post-Arrival Orientation venue."

"From the airport, each JET participant is only allowed to bring one large suitcase or rucksack and one
carry-on to the Post-Arrival Orientation venue. This is due to space limitations and is strictly enforced at
the airport. From the airport to the hotel, you can also take a laptop computer, but you will have to hold it
on your lap with your carry-on. The remainder of your baggage will be sent from the airport to your
contracting organisation using a prearranged domestic delivery company.* The cost of this service will
vary depending on the size, weight and destination of each piece of baggage. Excessively large/heavy
pieces of baggage may incur extra charges. One piece of baggage costs approximately 2,500-5,000 yen
and takes 3-5 days to deliver. There are times when you receive your baggage after you have arrived at
your contracting organisation. For this reason, please pack necessary items for an extra two days in your
carry-on."




Am I the only one who read the GI Handbook?


Yes, I had read this before making this post. However, this does not tell me how many extra pieces of luggage JETs typically take with them when moving to Japan. All it tells me is that you are only allowed to bring two to orientation and the rest will be sent to your placement. But, since posting this, I have found out JETs typically take two large suitcases and one carry-on, and some may or may not have their winter clothes shipped to them.

the4ork
April 4th, 2016, 07:43
Yes, I had read this before making this post. However, this does not tell me how many extra pieces of luggage JETs typically take with them when moving to Japan. All it tells me is that you are only allowed to bring two to orientation and the rest will be sent to your placement. But, since posting this, I have found out JETs typically take two large suitcases and one carry-on, and some may or may not have their winter clothes shipped to them.

Ohhhh, gotcha. Wellp, having lived in Japan before, if you're concerned about what to bring with... just bring with necessities. Gizmotech pretty much nailed it. I'm only planning on bringing with clothes, a laptop, and assorted herbs and spices for cooking (because herbs and spices are expensive as fuck in Japan). Everything else you're better off buying in Japan because shipping is expensive. If you end up only staying a year, it's also a fantastic waste of money. Seasonal clothing is best bought in Japan too, it's really not that expensive if you know how to shop smart.

webstaa
April 4th, 2016, 08:27
Most JETs go with whatever they can take for free on the airliner. So two standard sized suitcases, a carry on, and a "personal item" are what most people bring. There's usually plenty of time at the airport to send a suitcase on via Yamato/Sagawa/Japan Post etc as you can only take one large suitcase to orientation - in fact, I'd recommend sending both and only taking the necessities for orientation with you. Depending on your placement, you might end up hauling a large suitcase through a couple stations/shinkansen or even a domestic flight (so you'd probably end up paying a baggage fee.) In fact - at TO, there was a option to send the second large suitcase ahead for exactly that reason. IIRC I paid 4000 from the airport and 3500 from the Keio for my suitcases.

mrcharisma
April 4th, 2016, 08:56
Yes, I had read this before making this post. However, this does not tell me how many extra pieces of luggage JETs typically take with them when moving to Japan. All it tells me is that you are only allowed to bring two to orientation and the rest will be sent to your placement. But, since posting this, I have found out JETs typically take two large suitcases and one carry-on, and some may or may not have their winter clothes shipped to them.

Take Valium with you. Lots.

Ini
April 4th, 2016, 10:41
There's no point bringing much stuff, 1 suitcase and a carry on bag should be enough. Most the men end up losing weight in the first few months because they turn up obese and out of shape so the lack of triple bacon cheeseburgers cause them to slim down and the women always end up eating their feelings and balloon up so none of your clothes will fit in 6 months time anyway

Hypno-Bro
April 4th, 2016, 16:28
Hahahaa

Ini with the cold hard truth pill
Swallow it

patjs
April 5th, 2016, 00:06
You'll probably notice a pattern that current/former JETs will all usually say "Bring way less than you are planning."

EVERYONE over packs. You do not need much stuff. It seems like most new JETs take full advantage of the allowance and have 2 large suitcases plus a carry on and then people also ship winter clothes..

I'd say one large suitcase, one small carry on and that is it. Maybe consider sending your coat or bulky sweaters by surface mail to save space if needed.

Shincantsen
April 5th, 2016, 00:16
It can seem pretty obvious to current/previous JETs, but it's not exactly super clear for incoming.

This is for the US - other countries get different allowances.

Generally, you take two large suitcases, one carry-on suitcase, and a backpack or purse. I would absolutely recommend not bringing or shipping more than that - once you arrive, you'll figure out that you need very little of what you brought. Other people are saying only bring one big suitcase - I say bring both, even if one is empty. You'll more than likely be bringing more back with you when you finish JET, so you'll be grateful for the extra space then.

You need, probably: one week's worth each of mix and match clothes for cold and hot weather. A suit. One or two coats. Three or four pairs of shoes. Toiletries to last you a couple weeks. A couple of sentimental items, if you want. A laptop/tablet.

It's not that you'll be living a hermit's life, it's that you're naturally going to want to buy new things while you're in Japan anyway, so you might as well not weigh yourself down when you arrive or spend tons of money on shipping things.

fryfry
April 5th, 2016, 02:26
As far as electrical appliances go, what voltage/outlet differences are there and what steps should I take? I'm talking small things like electric shavers and chargers/adapters.

Mega
April 5th, 2016, 06:29
When I studied abroad in Japan two years ago, I took, honestly, about a three-fourths of a suitecase (I filled 1/4 of it with a large duffel bag because I knew I would return with more than I took and I was so right!) and a carry-on. I only remember missing one thing I didn't bring (which I think was an article of clothing). So yes, I would say pack light. Though, I am very worried that I am going to overpack this time because I already have plans for a few extra sentimental items like a stuffed alpaca and a blanket my friend made me....

I had about 2 weeks worth of clothes and 4-5 pairs of shoes with me, which worked fine. However, I did buy a few items. Most were from a few american stores in tokyo because japanese clothing sizes can be small. As far as Japanese sizes go, I'm a woman who wears around size 10 pants in the US, and I could fit into some dresses in Japan (when they had an elastic waist band usually). However, most skirts and almost all shorts/pants that were japanese sized did NOT fit. Don't let this make you think you need to bring every item of clothes you own though because you can always order things online. Also, I've seen larger Japanese people wearing clothes. They must be buying them somewhere, lol. I also never found shoes that fit me (size 8.5 in the US), but I honestly did not try extremely hard.

And you may actually find your weight will change while in Japan. I dropped around 10-15 lbs while I was there due to walking a lot and a healthier diet. The U.S. has made me gain this back and some though. Too much fried chicken here in the South :P

webstaa
April 5th, 2016, 08:23
As far as electrical appliances go, what voltage/outlet differences are there and what steps should I take? I'm talking small things like electric shavers and chargers/adapters.

If you're from the US and there's a wall-wart (rectified power supply) for it, you'll be fine. You might need some grounding plug adapters (Japanese outlets are non-polarized and usually don't have a ground.) So plugs with one tall blade and one small blade might not fit - just pick up an adapter (from an electronics store, not the airport ones and save yourself $20.) However from Nagoya north is 100v 50hz and south is 100v 60hz. The only thing is impacts is things like shavers, hair clippers, or hair dryers etc that are designed to run at the US's 120v 60hz - on 100v 50hz they'll run cooler and/or slower. Check the labels on your chargers, if it says 100(120)-240v 60hz it's auto-switching and should charge a little slower, but just fine. If your shaver is one of those rechargeable ones, it should be fine - if it's got UL certification it should be fine on Japanese power as well, as they test down to -20% voltage (94v) to see if it still works. It's only stuff that runs straight out of the wall with just a plain plug on the end that might not work properly.

JPNLKatie
April 5th, 2016, 23:49
There's no point bringing much stuff, 1 suitcase and a carry on bag should be enough. Most the men end up losing weight in the first few months because they turn up obese and out of shape so the lack of triple bacon cheeseburgers cause them to slim down and the women always end up eating their feelings and balloon up so none of your clothes will fit in 6 months time anyway


Haha. I'm actually trying to lose weight before leaving so that I CAN find clothes that fit me in Japan. The JET Program has become a major motivation for me in this process, and I certainly hope I do not gain it all back once I move there. lol

Mega
April 6th, 2016, 00:01
Haha. I'm actually trying to lose weight before leaving so that I CAN find clothes that fit me in Japan. The JET Program has become a major motivation for me in this process, and I certainly hope I do not gain it all back once I move there. lol

If you're experience is anything like mine, you probably won't gain weight in Japan. I remember constantly eating (I had dessert crepes like twice a week....among other sweet items) and I would still drop pounds. Now in the U.S. when I did that, I gained 20 lbs....interesting how that works.

fryfry
April 6th, 2016, 00:40
lots of good info webustaarr, thanks.

Jiggit
April 6th, 2016, 08:35
If you're experience is anything like mine, you probably won't gain weight in Japan. I remember constantly eating (I had dessert crepes like twice a week....among other sweet items) and I would still drop pounds. Now in the U.S. when I did that, I gained 20 lbs....interesting how that works.

What are you even trying to say?

uthinkimlost?
April 6th, 2016, 09:35
If you're experience is anything like mine, you probably won't gain weight in Japan. I remember constantly eating (I had dessert crepes like twice a week....among other sweet items) and I would still drop pounds. Now in the U.S. when I did that, I gained 20 lbs....interesting how that works.

Portions in Japan are reasonable sized and people in Japan actually have to get off their bums to go anywhere.

moonbeam
April 6th, 2016, 10:15
Portions in Japan are reasonable sized.

School lunch is not reasonably sized (for me). It's more than twice what I would normally eat for lunch and it's caused me to gain a lot of weight.

uthinkimlost?
April 6th, 2016, 10:24
School lunch is not reasonably sized (for me). It's more than twice what I would normally eat for lunch and it's caused me to gain a lot of weight.

Let's not go down THIS path again...

moonbeam
April 6th, 2016, 13:34
Yeah, I didn't want to be one of THOSE people but it's totally true for me. I've dealt with it though.

word
April 6th, 2016, 14:04
Let's not go down THIS path again...
LOL word

Jiggit
April 6th, 2016, 14:08
Yeah, I didn't want to be one of THOSE people but it's totally true for me. I've dealt with it though.

So are all your coworkers and students bulimic?

acpc2203
April 6th, 2016, 14:09
I found the school lunch to be a bit on the small side.

moonbeam
April 6th, 2016, 14:31
So are all your coworkers and students bulimic?

No, I just don't eat very much. They have no problems with the giant bowls of rice and every side dish but I can't even finish half. I used to but then I noticed I was on my way to becoming a land whale so I stopped forcing myself to eat it all.

Anyway. Everything else is reasonably sized though, I agree.

Penguinonfire
April 8th, 2016, 09:28
I brought two full suitcases and a carry-on, and I do suggest you do the same (you'll probably want all that space when you return).

But: 90% of the clothes I brought were worthless upon arrival. All of your dress clothes are probably too thick for Japanese weather (except maybe in the depths of winter) so you'll be buying new clothes anyway. You might have better luck if you're placed in Hokkaido.
I've used very little of what I brought but I'm glad to have the luggage space for the return trip, if I end up making one.

I'd definitely try to avoid sending anything separately, it's not cheap. You also really don't need much omiyage. Maybe bring something for your supervisor and your base school's principal and vice principal, but that's it. Omiyage is not expected when you first show up, get stuff when you go on trips.

patjs
April 9th, 2016, 00:32
Omiyage is not expected when you first show up, get stuff when you go on trips.

Oh boy, let's not go down this road again either! :lol:

Zolrak 22
April 11th, 2016, 11:02
Oh boy, let's not go down this road again either! :lol:
Hah!

Good times...

JPNLKatie
June 8th, 2016, 03:30
So, I thought I'd just add to this instead of creating a new thread:

Does anyone have any advice for the best *type* of luggage to get? Such as fabric vs polycarbonate, and best brands?

I've already decided that I'm just going to buy a three piece luggage set that comes with a 28", 24/5", and a 20/1" carry on. I'm hoping to get the whole set for under $200, but I want to make sure I get something that won't fall apart before I get to Japan.

Does anyone have any reccomendations?

webstaa
June 8th, 2016, 08:23
Hard case luggage is far and away the most popular type in Japan. But it scratches, cracks and breaks instead of denting or deforming like most heavy fabric suitcases. Don't expect it to look shiny and new after 13 adventure in the hold of a plane and two trips through baggage handling. Modern luggage can last a long time, but a lot of it isn't beautiful...

If you get zippered luggage, be aware that it's impossible to secure - even if you lock it, you can still undo the zipper with a ballpoint pen.

I'd recommend hard shell, with clasp/latches that lock shut. Then get a luggage strap or two to go around the outside in case the clasps fail or the TSA (or whoever else opens your luggage) doesn't shut it properly.

moonbeam
June 8th, 2016, 08:50
I bought mine from Target for $50 each or something. When I'm not using them (which has only been twice--once to move out here and once to visit home) they sit in my garage collecting dust and spiders.

Basically, unless you're planning on travelling with your entire wardrobe every month, I don't think you need anything fancy.

word
June 8th, 2016, 12:53
My only advice is that you get a nested set. It is possible--likely, even--that space will be at a premium when you arrive. It may be very helpful if your suitcases all fit inside the largest one.

Ini
June 8th, 2016, 12:58
suitcases? you only need 1.

word
June 8th, 2016, 14:00
suitcases? you only need 1.

This is true, really.

fryfry
June 9th, 2016, 02:26
I'm planning on taking one large suitcase, and a backpack ("rucksack") and a violin as carry-ons.
Regarding the fiddle, I'm a little nervous because the instructions for Tokyo arrival say "personal item" + rucksack and don't specify dimensions.
The violin is definitely a very personal item, and not something I'm willing to have sent as luggage. Also, given my application I'd say there's a fair chance someone will expect me to bring it. Not extremely worried, but I figured as long as the conversation was started I'd throw this out there.

mrcharisma
June 9th, 2016, 08:08
IAlso, given my application I'd say there's a fair chance someone will expect me to bring it.

Your school probably won't even bother to look up your name until the day they meet you, much less scour your app for extra-curricular pastimes.

Welcome to the world of minimal expectations!

webstaa
June 9th, 2016, 08:25
Your school probably won't even bother to look up your name until the day they meet you, much less scour your app for extra-curricular pastimes.

Welcome to the world of minimal expectations!

Aside from your predecessor, it's likely that no-one at the schools will know your name until you are formally introduced. Aside from maybe the Principal and VP. And after that, the only ones that will remember your name are the VP and the JTEs... for a week or two.

acpc2203
June 9th, 2016, 08:29
The best way to be remembered is to do something colossally stupid in front of the whole school.

fryfry
June 9th, 2016, 09:00
The best way to be remembered is to do something colossally stupid in front of the whole school.

sounds like I'll need even less preparation than I thought.

Not really interested in being remembered, but I would like to make sure I'm able to perform certain skills that I took the time to put in my SOP. I suppose it's good to know it's not actually "expected", though.

mrcharisma
June 9th, 2016, 09:13
sounds like I'll need even less preparation than I thought.

Not really interested in being remembered, but I would like to make sure I'm able to perform certain skills that I took the time to put in my SOP. I suppose it's good to know it's not actually "expected", though.

I wouldn't sweat the skills at all. Your average Jet's "skillset" stretches no further than dreary, self-indulgent "vlogging" and drinking alone in their apartment.

Top that and you're one of the high achievers.

uthinkimlost?
June 9th, 2016, 09:16
I'm planning on taking one large suitcase, and a backpack ("rucksack") and a violin as carry-ons.
Regarding the fiddle, I'm a little nervous because the instructions for Tokyo arrival say "personal item" + rucksack and don't specify dimensions.
The violin is definitely a very personal item, and not something I'm willing to have sent as luggage. Also, given my application I'd say there's a fair chance someone will expect me to bring it. Not extremely worried, but I figured as long as the conversation was started I'd throw this out there.


If you're not concerned with having that -particular- violin, I'd squirrel it safely away somewhere in the US and pick up one at a recycle shop. I've seen student models for 5000 en

mothy
June 9th, 2016, 09:23
Aside from your predecessor, it's likely that no-one at the schools will know your name until you are formally introduced. Aside from maybe the Principal and VP. And after that, the only ones that will remember your name are the VP and the JTEs... for a week or two.

That was your experience? All the English teachers knew my name before I got there, and all the other teachers seemed to have no problem remembering my name from day one. I was the one who didn't know or couldn't remember anyone's name. It was the celeb life. Everyone knew my name while I didn't know anyone.

Frap
June 9th, 2016, 09:49
That was your experience? All the English teachers knew my name before I got there, and all the other teachers seemed to have no problem remembering my name from day one. I was the one who didn't know or couldn't remember anyone's name. It was the celeb life. Everyone knew my name while I didn't know anyone.

Same!

I said hajimemashite to people I'd already met so many times.

Including the head of the BOE~

Frap
June 9th, 2016, 09:51
"フラップ ... 我々はすでに会いました ..."

moonbeam
June 9th, 2016, 10:12
Lol my BOE doesn't even have my SOP in my file.

As for the violin dimensions...they just mean something smaller, like a purse or computer bag. I think your violin case will be fine with your rucksack.

fryfry
June 9th, 2016, 11:41
If you're not concerned with having that -particular- violin, I'd squirrel it safely away somewhere in the US and pick up one at a recycle shop. I've seen student models for 5000 en
I might have to give it a little thought. It is very much MY violin, and I'd like to have it as a personal item, but I am also very much interested in using it in a volunteer capacity. I'd like to say "professional", as well, but I'm not assuming I'll be allowed to profit from it while on JET. I probably shouldn't have implied I'd be using it much in the classroom.

Penguinonfire
June 9th, 2016, 11:41
All of the English teachers definitely knew who I was. They told me that they looked through everyone's file to decide who they'd take for this school, and they picked me because I "had a lot of teaching experience" (leading a chat group and helping out in Japanese class is apparently a lot of teaching experience, if that tells you anything).

I'm also at the highest level school in the prefecture, so maybe that's just a high level school thing.

On the violin topic, I brought a carry-on and a checked suitcase (not completely filled, but I wanted both for when I need to bring stuff back), along with a backpack AND a ukulele case with my uke inside. The Ukulele was my "personal item". I had no problems at all with any of it.

fryfry
June 9th, 2016, 11:55
All of the English teachers definitely knew who I was. They told me that they looked through everyone's file to decide who they'd take for this school, and they picked me because I "had a lot of teaching experience" (leading a chat group and helping out in Japanese class is apparently a lot of teaching experience, if that tells you anything).

I'm also at the highest level school in the prefecture, so maybe that's just a high level school thing.

On the violin topic, I brought a carry-on and a checked suitcase (not completely filled, but I wanted both for when I need to bring stuff back), along with a backpack AND a ukulele case with my uke inside. The Ukulele was my "personal item". I had no problems at all with any of it.
wonderful. I'm still going to be cautious in taking it over, but it's nice to know it worked out for someone else.

And yeah, I was actually curious about how much power the BOEs have in regard to the selection process, or whether it's all decided more centrally. From what I've seen here, seems like it might be both.

Jiggit
June 9th, 2016, 12:13
Same!

I said hajimemashite to people I'd already met so many times.

Including the head of the BOE~

First day I walked in and did my super serious Japanese self-introduction that I'd been told I MUST prepare to the only guy wearing a suit in the middle of the office. Turned out to be the janitor.

When I did meet the principal the first thing he said was "haven't you got a big conk".

acpc2203
June 9th, 2016, 12:18
Well to be fair the janitor is several magnitudes more important than the ALT.

Frap
June 9th, 2016, 12:38
First day I walked in and did my super serious Japanese self-introduction that I'd been told I MUST prepare to the only guy wearing a suit in the middle of the office. Turned out to be the janitor.

When I did meet the principal the first thing he said was "haven't you got a big conk".

i love a man with a strong nose tbh

OatsCurrySummer
June 9th, 2016, 13:37
i love a man with a strong nose tbh
sousu gao? grosssssss. We've got to be on the same page if we're going to catch us a man.

mrcharisma
June 9th, 2016, 18:12
I'd like to say "professional", as well, but I'm not assuming I'll be allowed to profit from it while on JET.

If all you're doing is busking and making people stare into the middle distance at parties or events, you'll slip under the radar No problem.