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JPNLKatie
July 4th, 2016, 01:51
So apparently there is a "two month supply" limit on OTC medications.

But what I'm trying to understand is, what exactly is "two months" worth? Is it two bottles of pills? Is there a limit on the exact number of pills? For example, if I was to just take Advil, how many bottles / pills can I take?

Also, is this limit on per medication, or is it on any OTC medications I bring as a whole? I want to bring some Advil (liquid gels) and some pamprin. Can I bring two months worth of advil along with two months worth of pamprin, or do they need to be two months worth all together? (such as one month of advil and one month of pamprin.)

I've been trying to find info on the specifics of this but I've been having a hard time.

webstaa
July 4th, 2016, 08:06
In 2011 I brought a massive bottle of Advil liquid gels, which was probably more than two months supply. Actually, it was probably around 3-4 years supply - I think I tossed the remainder out last year when I was going through stuff back in the states. Realistically you'll probably be fine as long as you don't bring anything outright banned (like Tylenol PM etc.) I'd assume two months probably means two months of daily use.

richief_611
July 4th, 2016, 19:03
Whenever I go back home to visit and then come back to Japan, I always restock on OTC medicines. And I mean A LOT. I usually just stick them in my checked in luggage, and it's fine. I usually keep them in their original packaging for just in case, but I've taken up to 3-6 months' worth of medicines before. I usually bring a lot of allergy medicine, cold medicine, Aleve, and Dramamine. I can't live without Dramamine. Also, you won't be able to buy them while you're in Japan to be shipped from your country, so take a lot! Japan has a lot of medicine, so you'll probably be able to find something similar if you ever run out.

Or if you have friends or family visiting you in Japan, have them bring some for you. Or when you go back home to visit, stock up once again.

Also, be prepared to catch a cold or get sick more often than not. Before I came to Japan, I got sick maybe once a year in the U.S. Since I've been in Japan, once a year has become 3-6 times a year. I don't know why, but that's what happened to me. It's probably due to me aging (still in my 20's but yeah), the intense weather and seasonal changes, and also how I walk and bike a lot, compared to my lifestyle in America.

The main culprit is the weather though. In the winter, it's extremely cold with no central heating in your apartments or at schools. So you're shivering throughout the entire day. And in the summer, it's extremely hot and humid. Schools only put on the A/C during July, I think. And maybe also August. But even when they do, it goes off and on, because they're trying to save power. So you might be in a classroom with A/C one period, but then not have A/C the next period. When there's no A/C, you are suffering and sweating like crazy. You also can't drink water while class is in session too.

moonbeam
July 5th, 2016, 10:43
There are so many interpretations on what the 'two month' supply means; it's pretty vague. Some say to follow the directions, some say it depends on your individual needs. So who knows? I do know that it's per item though. So if you want to bring Advil and pamprin then you can bring two months of each. Whatever that means. I brought a giant bottle of Advil with me and was fine. My best friend brought me another giant bottle, plus a giant bottle of Benadryl and no one said anything. Just...don't make a business out of smuggling large quantities of drugs that may or may not be legal.

Isola
July 5th, 2016, 10:55
I take a bottle of Advil (200 liquid gels) with me every time I go home and never have a problem. Add on to that all the vitamins and supplements I bring, and I look like a drug dealer, but I'm white so no one cares. The two months apply to each medication.

You can buy Advil here (ibuprofen), but it's so much more expensive than the States.

JPNLKatie
July 5th, 2016, 13:12
Whenever I go back home to visit and then come back to Japan, I always restock on OTC medicines. And I mean A LOT. I usually just stick them in my checked in luggage, and it's fine. I usually keep them in their original packaging for just in case, but I've taken up to 3-6 months' worth of medicines before. I usually bring a lot of allergy medicine, cold medicine, Aleve, and Dramamine. I can't live without Dramamine. Also, you won't be able to buy them while you're in Japan to be shipped from your country, so take a lot! Japan has a lot of medicine, so you'll probably be able to find something similar if you ever run out.

Or if you have friends or family visiting you in Japan, have them bring some for you. Or when you go back home to visit, stock up once again.

Also, be prepared to catch a cold or get sick more often than not. Before I came to Japan, I got sick maybe once a year in the U.S. Since I've been in Japan, once a year has become 3-6 times a year. I don't know why, but that's what happened to me. It's probably due to me aging (still in my 20's but yeah), the intense weather and seasonal changes, and also how I walk and bike a lot, compared to my lifestyle in America.

The main culprit is the weather though. In the winter, it's extremely cold with no central heating in your apartments or at schools. So you're shivering throughout the entire day. And in the summer, it's extremely hot and humid. Schools only put on the A/C during July, I think. And maybe also August. But even when they do, it goes off and on, because they're trying to save power. So you might be in a classroom with A/C one period, but then not have A/C the next period. When there's no A/C, you are suffering and sweating like crazy. You also can't drink water while class is in session too.

What brands of allergy and cold medicine do you bring? It seems like a lot of brands are illegal to take to Japan, like Dayquil and Nyquil. Or maybe that was just older versions that were banned? Seems that Dayquil and Nyquil no longer contains Pseudoephedrine so it should be ok to bring now?

TachikawaTruffle
July 5th, 2016, 13:17
What brands of allergy and cold medicine do you bring? It seems like a lot of brands are illegal to take to Japan, like Dayquil and Nyquil.
What makes you think Dayquil is illegal?

Acetaminophen 325 mg
Dextromethorphan HBr 10 mg
Phenylephrine HCl 5 mg
Looks kosher to me.

JPNLKatie
July 5th, 2016, 13:26
What makes you think Dayquil is illegal?

Looks totally kosher to me.


Because I came across this article: 4 Surprising Things that are Illegal in Japan | ForeverGeek (http://www.forevergeek.com/2014/11/4-surprising-things-illegal-japan/)

Which was published in 2014 and said that Dayquil was banned. But I don't think this person did their research because I then found this:Travel Japan - medicine restrictions (http://traveljapan.wikispaces.com/medicine+restrictions) Which says that since 2006, psuedoephedrine was removed from Dayquil/Nyquil and is now legal.

So it has left me a little confused.

edit*

Now I found this: http://www.kansaigaidai.ac.jp/asp/pdf/current_students/01_student_handbook/Drug_Laws_In_Japan.pdf

That does say Nyquil is prohibited but doesn't mention dayquil

I'm even more confused

moonbeam
July 5th, 2016, 15:03
You can get Dayquil cough drops here though. I'm not sure if they're the same but that may be why nothing mentions it.