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edinburger
June 3rd, 2004, 01:24
Have already posted this on BD but thought I'd cast the net wider:

Was just wondering what the general concensus is on what immunisations people got/need for going to Japan. I have been given so much contrasting advice that I now wish I had never asked. Some folk are telling me to get Jap b and Hep b, while others are saying to get none until I get there. Jet desk said find out from my predecessor what they did but I have still to find out who this is plus after phoning the travel clinic at the hospital I have found out that there are no appointments left before we go. The private clinics are charging £70 for Jap B and £102 for Hep B.

Sorry if this has already been discussed but couldn't find it if it has.

IowaJET
June 3rd, 2004, 01:36
What is a jag? Is that like...an immunization? (totally guessing from context...I've never heard the word before)

Fyrey
June 3rd, 2004, 01:53
i think he means jabs. as in injections.

Manshonyagger
June 3rd, 2004, 02:14
Aww. And there I was thinking they were going to give us free Jaguars to drive around in Japan to promote the British car industry (do we still have one?)... :)

You don't necessarily need jabs for Japan. Japan's a modern country. If you're planning on doing some travelling in Asia when you're over there, it mightn't be a bad idea to get your shots - whether it would be cheaper to get them done here or in Japan, I don't know.

Cornelius
June 3rd, 2004, 02:22
I don't think you need to go private just to get some innoculations. I went to the NHS and got them for free.

Before I tell you what I got, I'll tell you what my doctor said (he was one of those roving relief aid doctors, so I put faith in what he told me).

"You don't need jabs for Japan."

That said, he gave me Hep A and Hep C, Typhoid, and Polio.

The reasons being that should I want to travel around Asia, these shots will come in handy.

At some point next week I'll probably pop in for a booster for the above (they only last a year, but a booster shot greatly increases this), and get a Hep B as well (you normally only get this if you ask, and I forgot).

You can get these in Japan if you wish, but I chose not to. Why go through the hassle of potential language issues, as well as possibly paying cash for something you could get over here for free?

I hope the above helps.

C.

Fyrey
June 3rd, 2004, 07:33
As much as I detest needles (almost passed out at the typhoid one I got for Turkey), I'm gonna get it done :( *sobs*

you big wuss.

dandandiddly
June 3rd, 2004, 23:10
Well if you are planning to go wading around paddy fields planting rice or playing/swimming in any rivers then you'll need the japanese encephalatus (dont think I have spelt that right) jab - which is not available on the NHS and you have to pay for it.

Cornelius
June 3rd, 2004, 23:44
Well if you are planning to go wading around paddy fields planting rice or playing/swimming in any rivers then you'll need the japanese encephalatus (dont think I have spelt that right) jab - which is not available on the NHS and you have to pay for it.


Do you know how much something like that would cost?

Dynamis
June 3rd, 2004, 23:50
Its around 130 quid at my surgery. I think its a course of 3 as well. (Damn, i keep forgetting to arrange it)

Matt (who most certainly plans to do stuff like swim in rivers and paddy fields)

dobharrison
June 4th, 2004, 00:01
I think it's about £80 - £130 depending on the clinic.

professor_chimpenstein
June 4th, 2004, 00:29
The FCO (foreign commonwealth office) suggests that no injections are required - however it does mention bird flu and the fact that you should stay away from any bird markets.


Birds have their own markets? What do they pay with?and how do they carry the stuff home without any hands?

6 for a pound yer bird seed!

:lol:

professor_chimpenstein
June 4th, 2004, 00:32
However it also provides advice like "Dont break the law"

Oh yeah thanks for that - and here I was thinking it was ok to break the Law in some countries.

:lol: :lol:

dobharrison
June 4th, 2004, 00:41
Birds have their own markets?

Yes, and the advantage of a bird market is that everything is going cheep.

Sorry.

Cornelius
June 24th, 2004, 18:18
Its around 130 quid at my surgery. I think its a course of 3 as well. (Damn, i keep forgetting to arrange it)

Matt (who most certainly plans to do stuff like swim in rivers and paddy fields)

Considering that I'm going to Iwate (home of the rice field), I asked my doc about the Japanese Encephalitis immunisation, and confirmed that it's a course of 3 injections. I got my first one yesterday, and I'll get the next two over the next couple of weeks.

The cost?

Free.

God, I love the NHS.

C.

Laura
June 24th, 2004, 18:26
I went along to my student health centre today and the nice nurse gave me Hep B (need 3 doses over 4 weeks), Hep A/Typhoid, and I'll be getting a Tetatus/Diphtheria next week. I can't for the life of me remember what shots I got at school, I really hope I did have polio..... :?

All the above were free. The nurse said as we're working in Japan (and not just on a jolly) they are free on the NHS, just need to fill out a short form. As for the Japanese encephalitis vaccine, it can have some nasty side effects so you should stick around for at least 28 days after the course is completed (so said nurse). As there's no time for that, and it's for travel to Thailand etc, I'll just get it when I'm there. Fun!

Sinbad
June 24th, 2004, 20:01
well.. I have just this minute returned from being stabbed with needles by a nurse.

She said I should consider getting Japanese encephaitis (the vaccine) - although it's pretty rare in Japan (but unfortunatley they didn't offer it at this particular clinic) - and more common in other parts of Asia.

I did get however:

Diphtheria/Tetnus - combined
Hep B. - have to go back for 2 more injections
Polio (with free dolly mixture)

This is really for travel outside of Japan to places like China, Thailand, Indonesia, The Phillipines etc.

All Free... cheers NHS :wink:

adammoogle
June 24th, 2004, 22:04
gah! 8O :( :o is anyone else suffering side effects from the jabs???
i had one in each arm, can't remember what i got now but it was typhoid fever, diptheria and a tetanus booster (hep A i got when i went to india), left arm is sore but ok
right shoulder is swelled up, covered in a nasty rash, hurts like sunburn to the touch and is stiff as a morning woody :cry:
are we sure the disease is worse than the cure???

Dynamis
June 25th, 2004, 00:01
I'm having hep B and Jap Enceph today. One in each arm. Thx for the advice, i'll try and play the "working, not travelling" card and get it free.

If you don't see me at orientation, i've dropped dead from the side-effects.

Matt

Dynamis
June 25th, 2004, 18:33
Haha. Well, the injections themselves were fine. i was supposed to hang around for 30 mins incase it went wrong, but i couldnt be bothered and just went home.

However...

Me: Thanks for the jabs
Nurse: That'll be 160 quid.
Me: *PUKE*

June 25th, 2004, 19:26
I got my (first round of) shots the other day and my doctor didn't seem that keen on giving me the Hep B. She asked if I really wanted the shot since the disease is transmitted only through blood and "other bodily fluids." (Said with the "Just what exactly are you planning to do over there, young man?" look.)

I did get it, however, along with shots for Hep A and Polio. I also received pills for Typhoid and Malaria (isn't that what gin & tonics are for?).

Dynamis
June 25th, 2004, 20:37
Heh. The nurse strongly recommended hep B for me. I must look like that kind of guy.... oh well :lol:

Yeah, malaria... have to get stuff for that too. arg, so much to do, and so little inclination to do it!!

Matt

JayDubya
June 29th, 2004, 00:04
Right. Hello all.

I have been pretty confused about the injections and stuff so I asked somebody I know who is a GP. He gave me a copy of GP magazine, which had a big section on travel vaccinations. This is what it said for Japan:

Typhoid - No risk
Hepatitis A - Consider immunisation for high risk travellers only eg. health / teaching work, rural and long-stay travellers.
Diphtheria - No risk
Hepatitis B -No risk
Polio - No risk
Meningitis - No risk
Rabies - No risk
Encephalitis - Consider immunisation for high risk travellers only eg. health / teaching work, rural and long-stay travellers. Highest risk season is June to September.

So there you go. The magazine got the info from MASTA - www.masta.org

Cornelius
June 29th, 2004, 05:47
Yep, that's pretty much the profile for Japan.

With a straight read of that, the only thing I really need is hep A and Encephalitis (I'm very rural).

That said, I'll probably visit a few other nearby countries, which means that getting a few of the other injections (hep C, typhoid, polio, etc) becomes a more desirable option.

July 12th, 2004, 13:27
If I were you guys I would check out the CDC website

http://www.cdc.gov/

This will give you all of the up to date information on what vaccinations to get and give you lots of "stay healthy" information for when you're travelling. It'll also give you info on anti-malaria pills, should you be going somewhere with a malaria risk. You check out by country and region, I believe.

The shots I've got under my belt (and that seemed good for this trip)are: Hep B, Hep A, Tetanus, Typhoid.

You should be able to get shots in Japan, if you haven't already, I just thought I'd get the hassle out of the way while I speak the language :)

Cory
July 13th, 2004, 00:32
gah! 8O :( :o is anyone else suffering side effects from the jabs???
i had one in each arm, can't remember what i got now but it was typhoid fever, diptheria and a tetanus booster (hep A i got when i went to india), left arm is sore but ok
right shoulder is swelled up, covered in a nasty rash, hurts like sunburn to the touch and is stiff as a morning woody :cry:
are we sure the disease is worse than the cure???

Hi Adam,

The diptheria/tetanus is typically the bad one--I had a similar reaction. Note to others: the effects hit a day after the shot. At the end of the first day I was fooled into thinking my immune system was "tough."