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goloons
December 26th, 2008, 08:13
I need a game to teach fifth graders the difference between "this" and "that." Currently, the HRT wants to play a game where we write kanji and ask students "What is this/that?" It's pretty much the worst game ever, and it's made even worse by the fact that she doesn't understand that in English, the correct answer would be "It's a kanji," not "It's a (meaning of kanji)." I need to come up with something better fast! Help please?

ampersand
December 26th, 2008, 09:19
I don't that it's much of a game, but you can drill in progressive rounds, depending on how many kids you have. Have them each get something out. Then have kids practice asking others "What's that?" -> "It's ~ ." or "This is ~ ." Then you can do the opposite. Instead of asking what someone else is holding, ask others what it is that they're holding. "What's this?" -> "It's ~ ." or "That's ~ ." You can do a third round, putting their items somewhere in the room to get the "What's that?" -> "That's a ~."

Make sure that no one uses scissors or anything else that are necessarily plural in English.

Wakatta
December 26th, 2008, 19:42
When I've taught this/that, I start by drilling the two concepts with gestures (which the kids imitate): pointing at an imaginary object held in the palm for 'this' and pointing somewhere in the room for 'that'.

I then tossed around flashcards or other objects to kids, and went around asking, "What is that?" (and having the class chorus the same), to which the kid responds, "This is a (X)". A review of a/some for singular/plural is not necessary but could help. You can then invert this to train the other skills -- e.g., kids have to ask "What is this?" and then everyone choruses, "that is..." Basically what Ampersand just said.

You can then add on "in English" or "in Japanese" and basically have fun running around doing vocabulary for classroom objects.

And of course, the pronunciation of "th" is essential (essential!) as a warm-up activity. Seriously. Tongue under (or I guess between) the teeth!