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Thread: Messages from the 2004JET Yahoo group

  1. #3081
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    From:

    mrkow2001 mrkow2000@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 4:14
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Shipping</font>
    <tt>I was going to send a load of stuff like clothes and aerosols (BO
    spray!) over in a tea chest / crate. Is this the best way? Or, does
    anyone have any better ideas on how to send over a load of stuff?


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, noeljslattery@a... wrote:
    anyone got any idea how much shipping costs from the uk to japan ?
    (obviously depends on amount)


    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


  2. #3082
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    From:

    Yazz Akokan yazzrocks@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 4:18
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: books</font>
    <tt>Harry Potter - was lost after reading no. 5. at least 3 is released on film
    before we leave. (June 4th)

    Ben Davis entheh@u... wrote:
    On Monday 19 April 2004 00:01, Candace wrote:
    popular books. Lots of John Grisham, Harry Potter

    Just out of interest, would that be the Philosopher"s Stone or the Sorcerer"s
    Stone? :)

    Ben

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  3. #3083
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    From:

    Stephen Whaley manshonyagger@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 4:30
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Irish JETs</font>
    <tt>Hello Noelle. There"s two or three of us from the North who"re
    going. I"m Stephen W, from Belfast. Wheresabouts are you?:)

    Stephen W


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, noelle_hennessy
    noellehennessy@v... wrote:
    Hi all,
    Heard at the interview that 160 people were going for 60 places.
    So
    I"m curious about any other Irish Jets who are going? Myself and
    my
    buddy got accepted and will find out in May where exactly we"re
    being
    placed. Fingers crossed we"ll be together.

    Looking forward to it.

    Noelle


  4. #3084
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    From:

    mrkow2001 mrkow2000@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 4:33
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Irish JETs</font>
    <tt>I"m from the North too (Larne area). I"m starting to crap it now :D




    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Stephen Whaley manshonyagger@y...
    wrote:
    Hello Noelle. There"s two or three of us from the North who"re
    going. I"m Stephen W, from Belfast. Wheresabouts are you?:)

    Stephen W


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, noelle_hennessy
    noellehennessy@v... wrote:
    Hi all,
    Heard at the interview that 160 people were going for 60 places.
    So
    I"m curious about any other Irish Jets who are going? Myself and
    my
    buddy got accepted and will find out in May where exactly we"re
    being
    placed. Fingers crossed we"ll be together.

    Looking forward to it.

    Noelle


  5. #3085
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    From:

    nsboarderchic nsboarderchic@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 5:49
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Vegetarians?</font>
    <tt>I am a vegetarian. Well, was, I started eating fish 2 years ago.

    I"m going to try hard not to eat any meat, but I"m going to keep
    myself open to trying new things. I realize I"m going to eat meat
    accidently, but I"m nervous I"ll end up eating more red meat than I
    can handle and get sick. Did that once my first year of being a
    vegetarian and I never want to get that sick again!


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, dobharrison dobharrison@y...
    wrote:
    I noticed somebody else is a vegetarian other than me. Are there
    any
    more of us? Are we crazy?


  6. #3086
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    From:
    2004JET@yahoogroups.com </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 6:12
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: New poll for 2004JET</font>
    <tt>
    Enter your vote today! A new poll has been created for the
    2004JET group:

    How many years do you plan on
    contracting with JET?

    o 1 year
    o 2 years
    o 3 years
    o 4 years
    o 5 + years
    o Not sure yet...


    To vote, please visit the following web page:

    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/2004JET/surveys?id=515477

    Note: Please do not reply to this message. Poll votes are
    not collected via email. To vote, you must go to the Yahoo! Groups
    web site listed above.

    Thanks!






  7. #3087
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    From:

    petesmp petesmp@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 6:17
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: What kind of Laptop are you planning to buy?</font>
    <tt>This is for those planning to take a Laptop to Japan or who already
    has one. I was curious what kind you"re planning to take.

    For myself I"m thinking of a DELL Inspiron 5150 or 8600




  8. #3088
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    From:

    Abigail MacBain hkmercredi@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 6:22
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: books</font>
    <tt>Terry Pratchett"s fun, but you can actually buy those in Japan too (friend of
    mine stocked up while there)... typical paperback is somewhere around 20 yen,
    probably a little less.
    -Abby

    Gareth Cottam Gareth_cottam@h... wrote:
    hmm.... well.. I WAS going to take wheel of time.. but if this book trade thing
    is going to happen, perhaps I should stock up on something different... Terry
    Pratchett anyone?


    ----- Original Message -----
    From: noeljslattery@a...
    To: 2004JET@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Monday, April 19, 2004 6:19 PM
    Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: books


    great idea about the book trade..this is something that should be definately
    set up...watch this space...


    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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  9. #3089
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    From:

    Abigail MacBain hkmercredi@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 6:35
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: books</font>
    <tt>Pamela,

    I"m sorry, I didn"t mean to belittle or judge your choice in what to pack or
    whatnot - I guess just because I have made poor packing choices in the past is
    no reason to assume others might make my same mistakes. I understand
    particularly well the vegetarian issues, and I myself will be bringing a small
    Japanese cookbook in Japanese and English my host sister sent me, as well as
    some other favorite recipes. I guess when I read 4 or 5 cookbooks I imagined
    the giant Better Homes and Gardens books or Joy of Cooking which are
    extraordinarily impractical for Japan. In absolutely no way did I mean to
    insult you, your intelligence, or your ability to pack and take care of
    yourself. I am very sorry if you felt attacked and misunderstood.

    However, I would love to talk with you sometime (perhaps through emails outside
    of the JET forum so we can cut down on the sheer number that come through) about
    favorite recipes or books you have found that translate well between the two
    cultures and temperature differences? I remember I tried making chocolate chip
    cookies in France once and they turned into a giant sheet of brittle chocolate
    chip SOMETHINGS! Any advice you"ve got would be great :o) Also, I have a lot
    of Moosewood cookbooks that have particularly great vegetarian soups and would
    love to share ideas with you.

    Sorry again!! And thank you for being honest and upfront with us.
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson jusam13@y... wrote:
    I was surpised how judgemental these responses were to my bringing cookbooks. I
    think people have been spending too much time on Big Daikon. I appreciate
    suggestions, but please don"t judge me without knowing the situation. I meant
    that I will have the books shipped initially and then rest with winter stuff. I
    will bring what I think I will need for the first few weeks in my suitcase. I
    feel like I need to defend myself so that it makes sense to you. First, I rarely
    cook using an oven and second it is not that hard to figure out converting from
    Celcius to Fahrenheit. If you cook enough it is easy to adapt and change
    recipes. The other is that I am bringing 1 Japanese cookbook that has really
    good explanations of the ingriedents and their uses (I would actually recommend
    one for everyone), I had trouble finding good English cookbooks in Japan. I am
    also a vegetarian, so I am bringing a book on different ways to cook tofu so
    that I don"t get bored (If it makes you feel better
    it is only about 20 pages). Then I will bring 1, 2, or 3 vegetarian and Asian
    cookbooks so that I can learn knew ways to cook vegetables I am not used to
    cooking. I also plan on bringing an American measuring cup. Cooking is a really
    important hobby of mine and I haven"t belittled anyone elses choices. Don"t
    assume other people have never traveled and never been to Japan. I am completly
    capable of taking care of myself.

    Thanks,
    Pamela


    #2- Cook books? Be realistic about what you pack. 4 cookbooks in Japan?
    Probably won"t do you much good since ovens (if your apt. has one) work in
    celcius (prob. for U.S. JETS) and are a lot smaller- think toaster ovens.
    Some places have a microwave-oven combo and ovens are becoming more common
    in newer developments, but don"t have high hopes. Also, the food choices
    will be very different. FYI, cheese in Japan will probably not hold up to
    your expectations.

    Abigail MacBain wrote:
    I am completely in agreement with you about loving books, but having taken giant
    research books on spring break trips several times, I reeeeeally suggest keeping
    the weight DOWN, particularly since you need to consider absolute basic needs
    first (which, okay, books do fit into, but you need to make room for other
    things too). As for language books, a dictionary, a phrase book and maybe a
    notebook for writing more words down in is a good idea. But as for learning, I
    would suggest finding a computer program (if you"re taking a computer with you,
    that is). Much easier to transport. Novels I won"t quibble about, although make
    REALLY sure they"re worth it (one or two at least should be favorites you can"t
    live without and want to read a thousand times). Cooking books I would suggest
    paring back on A LOT. I love cooking, but a lot of recipes are not rational for
    Japan (just about anything requiring an oven bigger than a toaster oven).
    Rather, photocopy or write out your favorite
    recipes and create ONE book of those. It"s much much more efficient. Don"t
    forget as well that you should have access to the internet at your school. Great
    sites like epicurean.com will give you new and easy ideas if you feel you need
    to branch out of your favorites. The educational books will be hardest for me, I
    think, although since my area of research is Japan I think I"ll be able to find
    a few there (once my Japanese improves - ooh, motivation!).

    Basically, from traveling a fair amount, books are one thing that can kill you
    and they are relatively easy to get in Japan depending on where you are (most
    major bookstores will have English sections, and they"re not much more
    expensive... you"d be amazed at the selection). If you can"t live without a new
    novel every week, try arranging a system with the JETs in your area to buy books
    online and rotate them. At the end when you"re returning home, leave the excess
    (or the ones you don"t like) with the school or for the next JET taking your
    place.

    When it"s time to pack, you"ll probably realize it"s just not practical to bring
    loads of heavy books over (course, you can fit a paperback about anywhere). My
    suggestion is to try packing your suitcase with a large shoebox in it. Figure
    out what you need to take out in order to accomodate the shoebox. At the end of
    it all, you"ll realize what you really do and really don"t need to take. Then
    remove the shoebox and add one or two small things (like your favorite stuffed
    animal you can"t live without) in its place.

    Don"t forget, you"ve got to find a way to fit visual aids and such for your
    classes in too!

    G"luck!
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson wrote:
    My thought was to take as much as I think I can use with me and with my winter
    clothes I will have more sent to me. I am thinking 10-20 intially and more
    later. I am leaving them in clearly marked boxes for my mom to send. I figure
    you need at least 5 different language books (dictionaries, workbooks, Kanji,
    etc.), about 3-4 novels, and 4-5 cooking books, and then 5 educational books.I
    love books and if I don"t have lots I will just want to buy them. I figure this
    is a good time to read all those books I was supposed to read in college. If you
    are are in an urban area or near one you can find English books, but I am afraid
    that will be a challenge in rural areas. I"m sure I will make trips just to
    visit a Kinokuniya. Although there is always Amazon.


    mrkow2001 wrote:
    I"ve also been thinking about this. How are you planning on taking
    these over? Remember, books are very heavy! Are you just going to
    put them in a tea crate / chest and ship it over along with your
    clothes?


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Pamela Bertelson wrote:

    Here is something I have been wondering about...Books. Can we start
    a list about good books in various categories? Please add you
    recommendations. This way we can share some of our varied knowledge
    on Japan.

    Thanks,

    Pamela

    Japanese Language Books

    The Kodansha Kanji Learner"s Dictionary (Love how it"s organized)

    A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar

    Travel Books

    The Lonely Planet Guide for Japan

    The Lonely Planet Hiking Japan

    Teaching English Books

    Japanese Culture (Novels and/or history books, etc.)

    Haruki Murakami (especially Norwegian Wood)

    Banana Yashimoto

    JET books (living and working in Japan)



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  10. #3090
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    From:

    mrkow2001 mrkow2000@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 6:37
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: What kind of Laptop are you planning to buy?</font>
    <tt>Already got a dell latitude c400 - lovely compact laptop



    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, petesmp petesmp@y... wrote:
    This is for those planning to take a Laptop to Japan or who already
    has one. I was curious what kind you"re planning to take.

    For myself I"m thinking of a DELL Inspiron 5150 or 8600


  11. #3091
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    From:

    noeljslattery@a... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 6:44
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: What kind of Laptop are you planning to buy?</font>
    <tt>is there anyone else out there who"s to skint to buy a laptop?


    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


  12. #3092
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    From:

    otteer@l... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 6:57
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: What kind of Laptop are you planning to buy?</font>
    <tt>I have a Toshiba Satellite to take over. I plan to buy a small MIDI keyboard
    (they make them real small and cheap these days) to ship over. Since I won"t be
    able to have real/full musical instruments it"ll be nice to still be able to
    make stuff on my computer. I also have a wireless router. It"s silly in my one
    bedroom apartment in the US and would be even sillier in a smaller one room
    apartment in Japan but I think I might ship that too. If I could ship myself
    enough to provide good Internet and music access in a box the size of oh, I
    don"t know, say 4 or 5 cookbooks, why not?


    On Mon, Apr 19, 2004 at 06:37:05PM -0000, mrkow2001 wrote:
    Already got a dell latitude c400 - lovely compact laptop



    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, petesmp petesmp@y... wrote:
    This is for those planning to take a Laptop to Japan or who already
    has one. I was curious what kind you"re planning to take.

    For myself I"m thinking of a DELL Inspiron 5150 or 8600





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  13. #3093
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    From:

    Molly morikyd@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:02
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: books</font>
    <tt>Aww! I feel so warm and fuzzy inside!
    I am popping into the thread to mention that I am definately
    concerned about cooking in Japan. I have created several unfortunate
    meals with all the conviniences of my American kitchen. I am greedily
    and desperately hoping for a stove, but I guess thats not likely is
    it? So I would certainly be interested in any simple, successful
    recipes as well if you didnt mind sharing. I imagine I will only be
    able to live off of cearel and toast and pocky for so long.
    ~Molly

    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Abigail MacBain hkmercredi@y...
    wrote:
    Pamela,

    I"m sorry, I didn"t mean to belittle or judge your choice in what
    to pack or whatnot - I guess just because I have made poor packing
    choices in the past is no reason to assume others might make my same
    mistakes. I understand particularly well the vegetarian issues, and
    I myself will be bringing a small Japanese cookbook in Japanese and
    English my host sister sent me, as well as some other favorite
    recipes. I guess when I read 4 or 5 cookbooks I imagined the giant
    Better Homes and Gardens books or Joy of Cooking which are
    extraordinarily impractical for Japan. In absolutely no way did I
    mean to insult you, your intelligence, or your ability to pack and
    take care of yourself. I am very sorry if you felt attacked and
    misunderstood.

    However, I would love to talk with you sometime (perhaps through
    emails outside of the JET forum so we can cut down on the sheer
    number that come through) about favorite recipes or books you have
    found that translate well between the two cultures and temperature
    differences? I remember I tried making chocolate chip cookies in
    France once and they turned into a giant sheet of brittle chocolate
    chip SOMETHINGS! Any advice you"ve got would be great :o) Also, I
    have a lot of Moosewood cookbooks that have particularly great
    vegetarian soups and would love to share ideas with you.

    Sorry again!! And thank you for being honest and upfront with us.
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson jusam13@y... wrote:
    I was surpised how judgemental these responses were to my bringing
    cookbooks. I think people have been spending too much time on Big
    Daikon. I appreciate suggestions, but please don"t judge me without
    knowing the situation. I meant that I will have the books shipped
    initially and then rest with winter stuff. I will bring what I think
    I will need for the first few weeks in my suitcase. I feel like I
    need to defend myself so that it makes sense to you. First, I rarely
    cook using an oven and second it is not that hard to figure out
    converting from Celcius to Fahrenheit. If you cook enough it is easy
    to adapt and change recipes. The other is that I am bringing 1
    Japanese cookbook that has really good explanations of the
    ingriedents and their uses (I would actually recommend one for
    everyone), I had trouble finding good English cookbooks in Japan. I
    am also a vegetarian, so I am bringing a book on different ways to
    cook tofu so that I don"t get bored (If it makes you feel better
    it is only about 20 pages). Then I will bring 1, 2, or 3 vegetarian
    and Asian cookbooks so that I can learn knew ways to cook vegetables
    I am not used to cooking. I also plan on bringing an American
    measuring cup. Cooking is a really important hobby of mine and I
    haven"t belittled anyone elses choices. Don"t assume other people
    have never traveled and never been to Japan. I am completly capable
    of taking care of myself.

    Thanks,
    Pamela


    #2- Cook books? Be realistic about what you pack. 4 cookbooks in
    Japan?
    Probably won"t do you much good since ovens (if your apt. has one)
    work in
    celcius (prob. for U.S. JETS) and are a lot smaller- think toaster
    ovens.
    Some places have a microwave-oven combo and ovens are becoming more
    common
    in newer developments, but don"t have high hopes. Also, the food
    choices
    will be very different. FYI, cheese in Japan will probably not hold
    up to
    your expectations.

    Abigail MacBain wrote:
    I am completely in agreement with you about loving books, but
    having taken giant research books on spring break trips several
    times, I reeeeeally suggest keeping the weight DOWN, particularly
    since you need to consider absolute basic needs first (which, okay,
    books do fit into, but you need to make room for other things too).
    As for language books, a dictionary, a phrase book and maybe a
    notebook for writing more words down in is a good idea. But as for
    learning, I would suggest finding a computer program (if you"re
    taking a computer with you, that is). Much easier to transport.
    Novels I won"t quibble about, although make REALLY sure they"re worth
    it (one or two at least should be favorites you can"t live without
    and want to read a thousand times). Cooking books I would suggest
    paring back on A LOT. I love cooking, but a lot of recipes are not
    rational for Japan (just about anything requiring an oven bigger than
    a toaster oven). Rather, photocopy or write out your favorite
    recipes and create ONE book of those. It"s much much more
    efficient. Don"t forget as well that you should have access to the
    internet at your school. Great sites like epicurean.com will give you
    new and easy ideas if you feel you need to branch out of your
    favorites. The educational books will be hardest for me, I think,
    although since my area of research is Japan I think I"ll be able to
    find a few there (once my Japanese improves - ooh, motivation!).

    Basically, from traveling a fair amount, books are one thing that
    can kill you and they are relatively easy to get in Japan depending
    on where you are (most major bookstores will have English sections,
    and they"re not much more expensive... you"d be amazed at the
    selection). If you can"t live without a new novel every week, try
    arranging a system with the JETs in your area to buy books online and
    rotate them. At the end when you"re returning home, leave the excess
    (or the ones you don"t like) with the school or for the next JET
    taking your place.

    When it"s time to pack, you"ll probably realize it"s just not
    practical to bring loads of heavy books over (course, you can fit a
    paperback about anywhere). My suggestion is to try packing your
    suitcase with a large shoebox in it. Figure out what you need to take
    out in order to accomodate the shoebox. At the end of it all, you"ll
    realize what you really do and really don"t need to take. Then remove
    the shoebox and add one or two small things (like your favorite
    stuffed animal you can"t live without) in its place.

    Don"t forget, you"ve got to find a way to fit visual aids and such
    for your classes in too!

    G"luck!
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson wrote:
    My thought was to take as much as I think I can use with me and
    with my winter clothes I will have more sent to me. I am thinking 10-
    20 intially and more later. I am leaving them in clearly marked boxes
    for my mom to send. I figure you need at least 5 different language
    books (dictionaries, workbooks, Kanji, etc.), about 3-4 novels, and 4-
    5 cooking books, and then 5 educational books.I love books and if I
    don"t have lots I will just want to buy them. I figure this is a good
    time to read all those books I was supposed to read in college. If
    you are are in an urban area or near one you can find English books,
    but I am afraid that will be a challenge in rural areas. I"m sure I
    will make trips just to visit a Kinokuniya. Although there is always
    Amazon.


    mrkow2001 wrote:
    I"ve also been thinking about this. How are you planning on taking
    these over? Remember, books are very heavy! Are you just going to
    put them in a tea crate / chest and ship it over along with your
    clothes?


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Pamela Bertelson wrote:

    Here is something I have been wondering about...Books. Can we
    start
    a list about good books in various categories? Please add you
    recommendations. This way we can share some of our varied knowledge
    on Japan.

    Thanks,

    Pamela

    Japanese Language Books

    The Kodansha Kanji Learner"s Dictionary (Love how it"s organized)

    A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar

    Travel Books

    The Lonely Planet Guide for Japan

    The Lonely Planet Hiking Japan

    Teaching English Books

    Japanese Culture (Novels and/or history books, etc.)

    Haruki Murakami (especially Norwegian Wood)

    Banana Yashimoto

    JET books (living and working in Japan)



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  14. #3094
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Cyberspace
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    4,095

    Default

    From:

    Molly morikyd@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:09
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: with our powers combined</font>
    <tt> It is really great to know that other JETS will be around learning
    and experiencing Japan together. I stayed in Japan for 6 weeks in
    high school and even though I loved it, it was also really difficult
    to be so isolated and unable to share my experiences. A forum like
    this would have helped take a lot of stress away I believe.
    Thanks for contributing everyone!
    ~Molly


  15. #3095
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    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Default

    From:

    otteer@l... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:10
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: books</font>
    <tt>I plan to make Udon a staple. I found a recipie online and modified it a bit to
    my tastes. Sorry I don"t have the link here but it was easy to google. Broth
    (which is fish-based) from bonito, soy sauce, and something with an M I can"t
    quite remember. I added fried tofu, cabbage, shiitake mushrooms, bean sprouts,
    and of course the noodles. Cheap, good, healthy, I was quite pleased.


    On Mon, Apr 19, 2004 at 07:02:40PM -0000, Molly wrote:
    Aww! I feel so warm and fuzzy inside!
    I am popping into the thread to mention that I am definately
    concerned about cooking in Japan. I have created several unfortunate
    meals with all the conviniences of my American kitchen. I am greedily
    and desperately hoping for a stove, but I guess thats not likely is
    it? So I would certainly be interested in any simple, successful
    recipes as well if you didnt mind sharing. I imagine I will only be
    able to live off of cearel and toast and pocky for so long.
    ~Molly

    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Abigail MacBain hkmercredi@y...
    wrote:
    Pamela,

    I"m sorry, I didn"t mean to belittle or judge your choice in what
    to pack or whatnot - I guess just because I have made poor packing
    choices in the past is no reason to assume others might make my same
    mistakes. I understand particularly well the vegetarian issues, and
    I myself will be bringing a small Japanese cookbook in Japanese and
    English my host sister sent me, as well as some other favorite
    recipes. I guess when I read 4 or 5 cookbooks I imagined the giant
    Better Homes and Gardens books or Joy of Cooking which are
    extraordinarily impractical for Japan. In absolutely no way did I
    mean to insult you, your intelligence, or your ability to pack and
    take care of yourself. I am very sorry if you felt attacked and
    misunderstood.

    However, I would love to talk with you sometime (perhaps through
    emails outside of the JET forum so we can cut down on the sheer
    number that come through) about favorite recipes or books you have
    found that translate well between the two cultures and temperature
    differences? I remember I tried making chocolate chip cookies in
    France once and they turned into a giant sheet of brittle chocolate
    chip SOMETHINGS! Any advice you"ve got would be great :o) Also, I
    have a lot of Moosewood cookbooks that have particularly great
    vegetarian soups and would love to share ideas with you.

    Sorry again!! And thank you for being honest and upfront with us.
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson jusam13@y... wrote:
    I was surpised how judgemental these responses were to my bringing
    cookbooks. I think people have been spending too much time on Big
    Daikon. I appreciate suggestions, but please don"t judge me without
    knowing the situation. I meant that I will have the books shipped
    initially and then rest with winter stuff. I will bring what I think
    I will need for the first few weeks in my suitcase. I feel like I
    need to defend myself so that it makes sense to you. First, I rarely
    cook using an oven and second it is not that hard to figure out
    converting from Celcius to Fahrenheit. If you cook enough it is easy
    to adapt and change recipes. The other is that I am bringing 1
    Japanese cookbook that has really good explanations of the
    ingriedents and their uses (I would actually recommend one for
    everyone), I had trouble finding good English cookbooks in Japan. I
    am also a vegetarian, so I am bringing a book on different ways to
    cook tofu so that I don"t get bored (If it makes you feel better
    it is only about 20 pages). Then I will bring 1, 2, or 3 vegetarian
    and Asian cookbooks so that I can learn knew ways to cook vegetables
    I am not used to cooking. I also plan on bringing an American
    measuring cup. Cooking is a really important hobby of mine and I
    haven"t belittled anyone elses choices. Don"t assume other people
    have never traveled and never been to Japan. I am completly capable
    of taking care of myself.

    Thanks,
    Pamela


    #2- Cook books? Be realistic about what you pack. 4 cookbooks in
    Japan?
    Probably won"t do you much good since ovens (if your apt. has one)
    work in
    celcius (prob. for U.S. JETS) and are a lot smaller- think toaster
    ovens.
    Some places have a microwave-oven combo and ovens are becoming more
    common
    in newer developments, but don"t have high hopes. Also, the food
    choices
    will be very different. FYI, cheese in Japan will probably not hold
    up to
    your expectations.

    Abigail MacBain wrote:
    I am completely in agreement with you about loving books, but
    having taken giant research books on spring break trips several
    times, I reeeeeally suggest keeping the weight DOWN, particularly
    since you need to consider absolute basic needs first (which, okay,
    books do fit into, but you need to make room for other things too).
    As for language books, a dictionary, a phrase book and maybe a
    notebook for writing more words down in is a good idea. But as for
    learning, I would suggest finding a computer program (if you"re
    taking a computer with you, that is). Much easier to transport.
    Novels I won"t quibble about, although make REALLY sure they"re worth
    it (one or two at least should be favorites you can"t live without
    and want to read a thousand times). Cooking books I would suggest
    paring back on A LOT. I love cooking, but a lot of recipes are not
    rational for Japan (just about anything requiring an oven bigger than
    a toaster oven). Rather, photocopy or write out your favorite
    recipes and create ONE book of those. It"s much much more
    efficient. Don"t forget as well that you should have access to the
    internet at your school. Great sites like epicurean.com will give you
    new and easy ideas if you feel you need to branch out of your
    favorites. The educational books will be hardest for me, I think,
    although since my area of research is Japan I think I"ll be able to
    find a few there (once my Japanese improves - ooh, motivation!).

    Basically, from traveling a fair amount, books are one thing that
    can kill you and they are relatively easy to get in Japan depending
    on where you are (most major bookstores will have English sections,
    and they"re not much more expensive... you"d be amazed at the
    selection). If you can"t live without a new novel every week, try
    arranging a system with the JETs in your area to buy books online and
    rotate them. At the end when you"re returning home, leave the excess
    (or the ones you don"t like) with the school or for the next JET
    taking your place.

    When it"s time to pack, you"ll probably realize it"s just not
    practical to bring loads of heavy books over (course, you can fit a
    paperback about anywhere). My suggestion is to try packing your
    suitcase with a large shoebox in it. Figure out what you need to take
    out in order to accomodate the shoebox. At the end of it all, you"ll
    realize what you really do and really don"t need to take. Then remove
    the shoebox and add one or two small things (like your favorite
    stuffed animal you can"t live without) in its place.

    Don"t forget, you"ve got to find a way to fit visual aids and such
    for your classes in too!

    G"luck!
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson wrote:
    My thought was to take as much as I think I can use with me and
    with my winter clothes I will have more sent to me. I am thinking 10-
    20 intially and more later. I am leaving them in clearly marked boxes
    for my mom to send. I figure you need at least 5 different language
    books (dictionaries, workbooks, Kanji, etc.), about 3-4 novels, and 4-
    5 cooking books, and then 5 educational books.I love books and if I
    don"t have lots I will just want to buy them. I figure this is a good
    time to read all those books I was supposed to read in college. If
    you are are in an urban area or near one you can find English books,
    but I am afraid that will be a challenge in rural areas. I"m sure I
    will make trips just to visit a Kinokuniya. Although there is always
    Amazon.


    mrkow2001 wrote:
    I"ve also been thinking about this. How are you planning on taking
    these over? Remember, books are very heavy! Are you just going to
    put them in a tea crate / chest and ship it over along with your
    clothes?


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Pamela Bertelson wrote:

    Here is something I have been wondering about...Books. Can we
    start
    a list about good books in various categories? Please add you
    recommendations. This way we can share some of our varied knowledge
    on Japan.

    Thanks,

    Pamela

    Japanese Language Books

    The Kodansha Kanji Learner"s Dictionary (Love how it"s organized)

    A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar

    Travel Books

    The Lonely Planet Guide for Japan

    The Lonely Planet Hiking Japan

    Teaching English Books

    Japanese Culture (Novels and/or history books, etc.)

    Haruki Murakami (especially Norwegian Wood)

    Banana Yashimoto

    JET books (living and working in Japan)



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    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/2004JET/

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    2004JET-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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    2004JET-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

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  16. #3096
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Cyberspace
    Posts
    4,095

    Default

    From:

    mrkow2001 mrkow2000@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:27
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: books</font>
    <tt>When I was in Japan last year, I survived on pot-noodle-look-a-likes.
    They were very tasty :) I"ll probably buy the shop out of them in
    August!!

    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, otteer@l... wrote:
    I plan to make Udon a staple. I found a recipie online and modified
    it a bit to my tastes. Sorry I don"t have the link here but it was
    easy to google. Broth (which is fish-based) from bonito, soy sauce,
    and something with an M I can"t quite remember. I added fried tofu,
    cabbage, shiitake mushrooms, bean sprouts, and of course the noodles.
    Cheap, good, healthy, I was quite pleased.


    On Mon, Apr 19, 2004 at 07:02:40PM -0000, Molly wrote:
    Aww! I feel so warm and fuzzy inside!
    I am popping into the thread to mention that I am definately
    concerned about cooking in Japan. I have created several
    unfortunate
    meals with all the conviniences of my American kitchen. I am
    greedily
    and desperately hoping for a stove, but I guess thats not likely
    is
    it? So I would certainly be interested in any simple, successful
    recipes as well if you didnt mind sharing. I imagine I will only
    be
    able to live off of cearel and toast and pocky for so long.
    ~Molly

    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Abigail MacBain hkmercredi@y...
    wrote:
    Pamela,

    I"m sorry, I didn"t mean to belittle or judge your choice in
    what
    to pack or whatnot - I guess just because I have made poor packing
    choices in the past is no reason to assume others might make my
    same
    mistakes. I understand particularly well the vegetarian issues,
    and
    I myself will be bringing a small Japanese cookbook in Japanese
    and
    English my host sister sent me, as well as some other favorite
    recipes. I guess when I read 4 or 5 cookbooks I imagined the
    giant
    Better Homes and Gardens books or Joy of Cooking which are
    extraordinarily impractical for Japan. In absolutely no way did I
    mean to insult you, your intelligence, or your ability to pack and
    take care of yourself. I am very sorry if you felt attacked and
    misunderstood.

    However, I would love to talk with you sometime (perhaps through
    emails outside of the JET forum so we can cut down on the sheer
    number that come through) about favorite recipes or books you have
    found that translate well between the two cultures and temperature
    differences? I remember I tried making chocolate chip cookies in
    France once and they turned into a giant sheet of brittle
    chocolate
    chip SOMETHINGS! Any advice you"ve got would be great :o) Also,
    I
    have a lot of Moosewood cookbooks that have particularly great
    vegetarian soups and would love to share ideas with you.

    Sorry again!! And thank you for being honest and upfront with
    us.
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson jusam13@y... wrote:
    I was surpised how judgemental these responses were to my
    bringing
    cookbooks. I think people have been spending too much time on Big
    Daikon. I appreciate suggestions, but please don"t judge me
    without
    knowing the situation. I meant that I will have the books shipped
    initially and then rest with winter stuff. I will bring what I
    think
    I will need for the first few weeks in my suitcase. I feel like I
    need to defend myself so that it makes sense to you. First, I
    rarely
    cook using an oven and second it is not that hard to figure out
    converting from Celcius to Fahrenheit. If you cook enough it is
    easy
    to adapt and change recipes. The other is that I am bringing 1
    Japanese cookbook that has really good explanations of the
    ingriedents and their uses (I would actually recommend one for
    everyone), I had trouble finding good English cookbooks in Japan.
    I
    am also a vegetarian, so I am bringing a book on different ways to
    cook tofu so that I don"t get bored (If it makes you feel better
    it is only about 20 pages). Then I will bring 1, 2, or 3
    vegetarian
    and Asian cookbooks so that I can learn knew ways to cook
    vegetables
    I am not used to cooking. I also plan on bringing an American
    measuring cup. Cooking is a really important hobby of mine and I
    haven"t belittled anyone elses choices. Don"t assume other people
    have never traveled and never been to Japan. I am completly
    capable
    of taking care of myself.

    Thanks,
    Pamela


    #2- Cook books? Be realistic about what you pack. 4 cookbooks in
    Japan?
    Probably won"t do you much good since ovens (if your apt. has
    one)
    work in
    celcius (prob. for U.S. JETS) and are a lot smaller- think
    toaster
    ovens.
    Some places have a microwave-oven combo and ovens are becoming
    more
    common
    in newer developments, but don"t have high hopes. Also, the food
    choices
    will be very different. FYI, cheese in Japan will probably not
    hold
    up to
    your expectations.

    Abigail MacBain wrote:
    I am completely in agreement with you about loving books, but
    having taken giant research books on spring break trips several
    times, I reeeeeally suggest keeping the weight DOWN, particularly
    since you need to consider absolute basic needs first (which,
    okay,
    books do fit into, but you need to make room for other things too)
    .
    As for language books, a dictionary, a phrase book and maybe a
    notebook for writing more words down in is a good idea. But as for
    learning, I would suggest finding a computer program (if you"re
    taking a computer with you, that is). Much easier to transport.
    Novels I won"t quibble about, although make REALLY sure they"re
    worth
    it (one or two at least should be favorites you can"t live without
    and want to read a thousand times). Cooking books I would suggest
    paring back on A LOT. I love cooking, but a lot of recipes are not
    rational for Japan (just about anything requiring an oven bigger
    than
    a toaster oven). Rather, photocopy or write out your favorite
    recipes and create ONE book of those. It"s much much more
    efficient. Don"t forget as well that you should have access to the
    internet at your school. Great sites like epicurean.com will give
    you
    new and easy ideas if you feel you need to branch out of your
    favorites. The educational books will be hardest for me, I think,
    although since my area of research is Japan I think I"ll be able
    to
    find a few there (once my Japanese improves - ooh, motivation!).

    Basically, from traveling a fair amount, books are one thing
    that
    can kill you and they are relatively easy to get in Japan
    depending
    on where you are (most major bookstores will have English
    sections,
    and they"re not much more expensive... you"d be amazed at the
    selection). If you can"t live without a new novel every week, try
    arranging a system with the JETs in your area to buy books online
    and
    rotate them. At the end when you"re returning home, leave the
    excess
    (or the ones you don"t like) with the school or for the next JET
    taking your place.

    When it"s time to pack, you"ll probably realize it"s just not
    practical to bring loads of heavy books over (course, you can fit
    a
    paperback about anywhere). My suggestion is to try packing your
    suitcase with a large shoebox in it. Figure out what you need to
    take
    out in order to accomodate the shoebox. At the end of it all,
    you"ll
    realize what you really do and really don"t need to take. Then
    remove
    the shoebox and add one or two small things (like your favorite
    stuffed animal you can"t live without) in its place.

    Don"t forget, you"ve got to find a way to fit visual aids and
    such
    for your classes in too!

    G"luck!
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson wrote:
    My thought was to take as much as I think I can use with me and
    with my winter clothes I will have more sent to me. I am thinking
    10-
    20 intially and more later. I am leaving them in clearly marked
    boxes
    for my mom to send. I figure you need at least 5 different
    language
    books (dictionaries, workbooks, Kanji, etc.), about 3-4 novels,
    and 4-
    5 cooking books, and then 5 educational books.I love books and if
    I
    don"t have lots I will just want to buy them. I figure this is a
    good
    time to read all those books I was supposed to read in college. If
    you are are in an urban area or near one you can find English
    books,
    but I am afraid that will be a challenge in rural areas. I"m sure
    I
    will make trips just to visit a Kinokuniya. Although there is
    always
    Amazon.


    mrkow2001 wrote:
    I"ve also been thinking about this. How are you planning on
    taking
    these over? Remember, books are very heavy! Are you just going
    to
    put them in a tea crate / chest and ship it over along with your
    clothes?


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Pamela Bertelson wrote:

    Here is something I have been wondering about...Books. Can we
    start
    a list about good books in various categories? Please add you
    recommendations. This way we can share some of our varied
    knowledge
    on Japan.

    Thanks,

    Pamela

    Japanese Language Books

    The Kodansha Kanji Learner"s Dictionary (Love how it"s
    organized)

    A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar

    Travel Books

    The Lonely Planet Guide for Japan

    The Lonely Planet Hiking Japan

    Teaching English Books

    Japanese Culture (Novels and/or history books, etc.)

    Haruki Murakami (especially Norwegian Wood)

    Banana Yashimoto

    JET books (living and working in Japan)



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    To visit your group on the web, go to:
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/2004JET/

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  17. #3097
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    Cyberspace
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    4,095

    Default

    From:

    Aaron Ackerson Aaron@A... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:31
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] with our powers combined</font>
    <tt>...we are Captain Planet!

    Captain Planet, he"s our hero
    Gonna take polution down to zero
    He"s our powers magnified,
    And he"s fighting on the planet"s side

    Captain Planet, he"s our hero
    Gonna take polution down to zero
    Gonna help him put asunder
    bad guys who like to... LOOT AND PLUNDER!

    Bad Guy: You"ll pay for this, Captain Planet!
    Captain Planet: No, I won"t!
    Bad Guy: Screw you!

    We"re the Planeteers and you can be one too
    "cause saving our planet is the thing to do
    Looting and poluting is not the way
    Here"s what Captain Planet has to say:

    Captain Planet: The power is MINE!

  18. #3098
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Cyberspace
    Posts
    4,095

    Default

    From:

    carrie sublett carriesub@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:35
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Chicago JETs</font>
    <tt>I applied in Chi-town. From St. Louis
    Carrie

    --- Morgan kappamorgan@h... wrote:
    Can we get a quick headcount of all of us who
    applied thru the
    Chicago office? I"ve been seeing Chicago mentioned
    more and more and
    I know Aaron is around Chi-town and we"ve got 2 down
    at U of I.
    Anyone else lurking??

    -Morgan







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  19. #3099
    Senior Member
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    Default

    From:

    Aaron Ackerson Aaron@A... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:35
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] New poll for 2004JET</font>
    <tt>----- Original Message -----
    From: 2004JET@yahoogroups.com
    To: 2004JET@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Monday, April 19, 2004 1:12 PM
    Subject: [2004JET] New poll for 2004JET


    How many years do you plan on
    contracting with JET?

    o 1 year
    o 2 years
    o 3 years
    o 4 years
    o 5 + years
    o Not sure yet...

    I"m pretty sure 3 years is the limit.

    Aaron

  20. #3100
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    Default

    From:

    starnia belen@d... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Apr 19, 2004 7:36
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: books</font>
    <tt>WAIT!!! WAIT!!! WAIT!!!

    What"s this? We might not have a stove? Is this serious?
    Even if it is only one burner I NEED a stove. I can do without an
    oven, but a range? I have already calculated shipping and other costs
    associated with making tortillas from in Japan (former JETS say they
    are near impossible to buy).

    Don"t get me wrong, I totally plan on being adventurous with food,
    and trying new things, but I might seriously have trouble without the
    comfort of a homemade tortilla, hot off the burner.

    Does anyone know FOR SURE, what the likelihood is of being a sad
    stove-less soul in Japan?



    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Molly morikyd@y... wrote:
    Aww! I feel so warm and fuzzy inside!
    I am popping into the thread to mention that I am definately
    concerned about cooking in Japan. I have created several
    unfortunate
    meals with all the conviniences of my American kitchen. I am
    greedily
    and desperately hoping for a stove, but I guess thats not likely is
    it? So I would certainly be interested in any simple, successful
    recipes as well if you didnt mind sharing. I imagine I will only be
    able to live off of cearel and toast and pocky for so long.
    ~Molly

    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Abigail MacBain hkmercredi@y...
    wrote:
    Pamela,

    I"m sorry, I didn"t mean to belittle or judge your choice in what
    to pack or whatnot - I guess just because I have made poor packing
    choices in the past is no reason to assume others might make my
    same
    mistakes. I understand particularly well the vegetarian issues,
    and
    I myself will be bringing a small Japanese cookbook in Japanese and
    English my host sister sent me, as well as some other favorite
    recipes. I guess when I read 4 or 5 cookbooks I imagined the
    giant
    Better Homes and Gardens books or Joy of Cooking which are
    extraordinarily impractical for Japan. In absolutely no way did I
    mean to insult you, your intelligence, or your ability to pack and
    take care of yourself. I am very sorry if you felt attacked and
    misunderstood.

    However, I would love to talk with you sometime (perhaps through
    emails outside of the JET forum so we can cut down on the sheer
    number that come through) about favorite recipes or books you have
    found that translate well between the two cultures and temperature
    differences? I remember I tried making chocolate chip cookies in
    France once and they turned into a giant sheet of brittle chocolate
    chip SOMETHINGS! Any advice you"ve got would be great :o) Also,
    I
    have a lot of Moosewood cookbooks that have particularly great
    vegetarian soups and would love to share ideas with you.

    Sorry again!! And thank you for being honest and upfront with us.
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson jusam13@y... wrote:
    I was surpised how judgemental these responses were to my
    bringing
    cookbooks. I think people have been spending too much time on Big
    Daikon. I appreciate suggestions, but please don"t judge me without
    knowing the situation. I meant that I will have the books shipped
    initially and then rest with winter stuff. I will bring what I
    think
    I will need for the first few weeks in my suitcase. I feel like I
    need to defend myself so that it makes sense to you. First, I
    rarely
    cook using an oven and second it is not that hard to figure out
    converting from Celcius to Fahrenheit. If you cook enough it is
    easy
    to adapt and change recipes. The other is that I am bringing 1
    Japanese cookbook that has really good explanations of the
    ingriedents and their uses (I would actually recommend one for
    everyone), I had trouble finding good English cookbooks in Japan. I
    am also a vegetarian, so I am bringing a book on different ways to
    cook tofu so that I don"t get bored (If it makes you feel better
    it is only about 20 pages). Then I will bring 1, 2, or 3
    vegetarian
    and Asian cookbooks so that I can learn knew ways to cook
    vegetables
    I am not used to cooking. I also plan on bringing an American
    measuring cup. Cooking is a really important hobby of mine and I
    haven"t belittled anyone elses choices. Don"t assume other people
    have never traveled and never been to Japan. I am completly capable
    of taking care of myself.

    Thanks,
    Pamela


    #2- Cook books? Be realistic about what you pack. 4 cookbooks in
    Japan?
    Probably won"t do you much good since ovens (if your apt. has
    one)
    work in
    celcius (prob. for U.S. JETS) and are a lot smaller- think
    toaster
    ovens.
    Some places have a microwave-oven combo and ovens are becoming
    more
    common
    in newer developments, but don"t have high hopes. Also, the food
    choices
    will be very different. FYI, cheese in Japan will probably not
    hold
    up to
    your expectations.

    Abigail MacBain wrote:
    I am completely in agreement with you about loving books, but
    having taken giant research books on spring break trips several
    times, I reeeeeally suggest keeping the weight DOWN, particularly
    since you need to consider absolute basic needs first (which, okay,
    books do fit into, but you need to make room for other things too).
    As for language books, a dictionary, a phrase book and maybe a
    notebook for writing more words down in is a good idea. But as for
    learning, I would suggest finding a computer program (if you"re
    taking a computer with you, that is). Much easier to transport.
    Novels I won"t quibble about, although make REALLY sure they"re
    worth
    it (one or two at least should be favorites you can"t live without
    and want to read a thousand times). Cooking books I would suggest
    paring back on A LOT. I love cooking, but a lot of recipes are not
    rational for Japan (just about anything requiring an oven bigger
    than
    a toaster oven). Rather, photocopy or write out your favorite
    recipes and create ONE book of those. It"s much much more
    efficient. Don"t forget as well that you should have access to the
    internet at your school. Great sites like epicurean.com will give
    you
    new and easy ideas if you feel you need to branch out of your
    favorites. The educational books will be hardest for me, I think,
    although since my area of research is Japan I think I"ll be able to
    find a few there (once my Japanese improves - ooh, motivation!).

    Basically, from traveling a fair amount, books are one thing that
    can kill you and they are relatively easy to get in Japan depending
    on where you are (most major bookstores will have English sections,
    and they"re not much more expensive... you"d be amazed at the
    selection). If you can"t live without a new novel every week, try
    arranging a system with the JETs in your area to buy books online
    and
    rotate them. At the end when you"re returning home, leave the
    excess
    (or the ones you don"t like) with the school or for the next JET
    taking your place.

    When it"s time to pack, you"ll probably realize it"s just not
    practical to bring loads of heavy books over (course, you can fit a
    paperback about anywhere). My suggestion is to try packing your
    suitcase with a large shoebox in it. Figure out what you need to
    take
    out in order to accomodate the shoebox. At the end of it all,
    you"ll
    realize what you really do and really don"t need to take. Then
    remove
    the shoebox and add one or two small things (like your favorite
    stuffed animal you can"t live without) in its place.

    Don"t forget, you"ve got to find a way to fit visual aids and
    such
    for your classes in too!

    G"luck!
    -Abby

    Pamela Bertelson wrote:
    My thought was to take as much as I think I can use with me and
    with my winter clothes I will have more sent to me. I am thinking
    10-
    20 intially and more later. I am leaving them in clearly marked
    boxes
    for my mom to send. I figure you need at least 5 different language
    books (dictionaries, workbooks, Kanji, etc.), about 3-4 novels, and
    4-
    5 cooking books, and then 5 educational books.I love books and if I
    don"t have lots I will just want to buy them. I figure this is a
    good
    time to read all those books I was supposed to read in college. If
    you are are in an urban area or near one you can find English
    books,
    but I am afraid that will be a challenge in rural areas. I"m sure I
    will make trips just to visit a Kinokuniya. Although there is
    always
    Amazon.


    mrkow2001 wrote:
    I"ve also been thinking about this. How are you planning on
    taking
    these over? Remember, books are very heavy! Are you just going to
    put them in a tea crate / chest and ship it over along with your
    clothes?


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Pamela Bertelson wrote:

    Here is something I have been wondering about...Books. Can we
    start
    a list about good books in various categories? Please add you
    recommendations. This way we can share some of our varied
    knowledge
    on Japan.

    Thanks,

    Pamela

    Japanese Language Books

    The Kodansha Kanji Learner"s Dictionary (Love how it"s
    organized)

    A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar

    Travel Books

    The Lonely Planet Guide for Japan

    The Lonely Planet Hiking Japan

    Teaching English Books

    Japanese Culture (Novels and/or history books, etc.)

    Haruki Murakami (especially Norwegian Wood)

    Banana Yashimoto

    JET books (living and working in Japan)



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