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Thread: Messages from the 2004JET Yahoo group

  1. #41
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    From:

    Christopher Ling Shinikenshi@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Thu Nov 27, 2003 4:58
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: [2004JET] Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt>Hmm...while we are on the subject, here"s a moderately interesting
    question...

    While I was attending university (still am, but anyways) I"ve had two
    significant jobs. One is my system administration job at one of the
    engineering departments on campus and the other is as vice president of a
    company that sells...anime-related stuff.

    Now, before we go too far, I realize that mentioning ANYTHING that has to do
    with anime is probably gonna get you sunk faster than emphasizing one"s
    great and devout appreciation for say...JPOP or Tokyo-like things, but I"m
    wondering if I can still use this position to some benefit on my education.

    Here"s my spin. Our company imports Japanese comics (specifically fan made
    comics called doujinshi ) for American consumption at conventions. Because
    of this, time must be actually spent negotiating prices and that sort of
    thing. Hence, I could say that the job is pertinent because it shows me how
    to interact with the Japanese on a business level, which one could say might
    be analagous to working with Japanese students on an academic level.

    So is this useful or not? I honestly care not that much for anime and am not
    going to the country for that purpose. And the way I see it, had it been any
    other product my company was dealing with, this would actually look better.
    Oh well.

    Any thoughts on this would be mightily appreciated. Since tomorrow is Turkey
    Day, I"ve got an extra day to edit my application before I send it out so
    hopefully you guys can give me some feedback on this.

    Much thanks in advance!

    _________________________________________________________________
    Say “goodbye” to busy signals and slow downloads with a high-speed Internet
    connection! Prices start at less than $1 a day average.
    https://broadband.msn.com (Prices may vary by service area.)


  2. #42
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    From:

    Christopher Ling Shinikenshi@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Thu Nov 27, 2003 4:58
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: [2004JET] Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt>Hmm...while we are on the subject, here"s a moderately interesting
    question...

    While I was attending university (still am, but anyways) I"ve had two
    significant jobs. One is my system administration job at one of the
    engineering departments on campus and the other is as vice president of a
    company that sells...anime-related stuff.

    Now, before we go too far, I realize that mentioning ANYTHING that has to do
    with anime is probably gonna get you sunk faster than emphasizing one"s
    great and devout appreciation for say...JPOP or Tokyo-like things, but I"m
    wondering if I can still use this position to some benefit on my education.

    Here"s my spin. Our company imports Japanese comics (specifically fan made
    comics called doujinshi ) for American consumption at conventions. Because
    of this, time must be actually spent negotiating prices and that sort of
    thing. Hence, I could say that the job is pertinent because it shows me how
    to interact with the Japanese on a business level, which one could say might
    be analagous to working with Japanese students on an academic level.

    So is this useful or not? I honestly care not that much for anime and am not
    going to the country for that purpose. And the way I see it, had it been any
    other product my company was dealing with, this would actually look better.
    Oh well.

    Any thoughts on this would be mightily appreciated. Since tomorrow is Turkey
    Day, I"ve got an extra day to edit my application before I send it out so
    hopefully you guys can give me some feedback on this.

    Much thanks in advance!

    _________________________________________________________________
    Say “goodbye” to busy signals and slow downloads with a high-speed Internet
    connection! Prices start at less than $1 a day average.
    https://broadband.msn.com (Prices may vary by service area.)


  3. #43
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    From:

    Justin! justin@e... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Fri Nov 28, 2003 6:12
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Questions...</font>
    <tt>I had a couple questions I was hoping the more experienced folks
    could answer...

    First of all, I have read in different sources that there are often
    questions in the interview asking how one would respond to questions
    dealing with my opinions on the president/the war/other
    controversial issues. I feel that I should give my honest and
    direct opinion along with a justification (if asked for) without
    shoving it down their throats. I know the tendency in Japanese
    Culture is to avoid conflict, and I also prefer to do this, but not
    in a way that turns me into an opinionless wishy washy cardboard cut-
    out of a person. I"m not confrontational when I give opinions, and
    don"t hold mine in higher regard than others". Would the
    interviewers look positively on an outlook such as this?

    Second, I was curious about how much freedom those of you who were
    ALTs had in the classroom. Were you able to create your own lesson
    plans at times? Did you have creative input on different
    activities? From what I"ve read, each situation is different - I
    just wanted to know what your personal experiences were. Thanks!

    -Justin


  4. #44
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    From:
    RG Pascual rgpascual@c... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Fri Nov 28, 2003 6:56
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Questions... Interview and Teaching Situations</font>
    <tt> I had a couple questions I was hoping the more experienced folks
    could answer...

    First of all, I have read in different sources that there are often
    questions in the interview asking how one would respond to questions
    dealing with my opinions on the president/the war/other
    controversial issues. I feel that I should give my honest and
    direct opinion along with a justification (if asked for) without
    shoving it down their throats. I know the tendency in Japanese
    Culture is to avoid conflict, and I also prefer to do this, but not
    in a way that turns me into an opinionless wishy washy cardboard cut-
    out of a person. I"m not confrontational when I give opinions, and
    don"t hold mine in higher regard than others". Would the
    interviewers look positively on an outlook such as this?


    I doubt that there is ever really a safe answer in an interview
    situation. One tip I"ve learned from my experiences in other interview
    situations is to gauge the level of your response against the
    closeness factor . Interviews are like an open dialogue. In the
    beginning, one starts out with superficial stuff and generalities. As
    the dialogue continues you start to get feel for what is appropriate
    to share and what is just plain out there .

    I suppose you could gauge how to respond by evaluating your
    interviewers. Do they look like Japanese nationals, or are the more
    American ? But that is just too darn lame. If I was an interviewer and
    I caught a candidate maneuvering based on what he/she thought of me, I
    would find it a turn-off. I know because I have been called (and
    hopelessly caught) on that point in the past. While Japanese culture
    seems to avoid conflicts, Japanese INDIVIDUALS will vary in
    temperament. There is a difference between the two.

    It would be rare that an interviewer will ask you about your opinion
    then judge you by what you"ve said. It is very likely however, that
    they may judge you by your ability to formulate and back up your
    opinion. That may involve any number of skills such as logical
    reasoning, resourcefulness and so on. For example, if they ask about
    your opinion on Japanese politics - the key point ma be to see if you
    have even a clue (organization, political figures, names, etc) no the
    topic of Japanese Civics.

    Second, I was curious about how much freedom those of you who were
    ALTs had in the classroom. Were you able to create your own lesson
    plans at times? Did you have creative input on different
    activities? From what I"ve read, each situation is different - I
    just wanted to know what your personal experiences were. Thanks!


    Found a good site while searching for sample application essays:

    http://www.thejetfiles.com

    The author of the site was a JET participant around 2000-2002. He also
    provides links to other JET member sites which I found very informative
    in the areas that you mention. From one JET member, who worked with
    three different teachers, the level of freedom really varied between
    individuals and their personalities.

    My 2 yen,

    Rich


  5. #45
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    From:

    Justin! justin@e... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Fri Nov 28, 2003 8:48
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: 3 Cheers for the US Postal Service</font>
    <tt>I was delighted to get a letter from myself, to myself - via the
    Japanese Embassy in the mail today. It came only 6 business days (8
    days minus Sunday + Thanksgiving) after I mailed the application.
    Fantastic! It says I will receive a response letter in late January
    or early February regarding my status. The waiting game officially
    commences.


  6. #46
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    From:
    <a href="ymsgr:sendIM?dynamisx">
    </a>
    Matt dynamisx@b... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Fri Nov 28, 2003 9:19
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Questions... Interview and Teaching Situations</font>
    <tt>Hi,

    Just had my interview today (London, so may not be so relevant to non-
    Brits) but I"ll add my observations anyway.

    First, I"d like to say that it was a good deal less painful than I
    thought. There were 2 ex-Jets answering questions and telling us to
    relax before hand. I was interviewed by only two people -- a JTE, and
    a mature ex-JET. Both were very nice, and they didn"t seem to be
    trying to catch me out, just asking questions based on my essay, and
    what I was saying in the interview. The pre-interview test was a
    little tricky, I had difficulty naming a famous sportsperson, but
    hey, I couldn"t say who is next in line for the thrown (yes, thrown)
    after the Duke of York either!


    First of all, I have read in different sources that there are
    often
    questions in the interview asking how one would respond to
    questions
    dealing with my opinions on the president/the war/other
    controversial issues.

    This didn"t really happen to me at all. The only situational question
    they asked was along these lines: What would you do if you had great
    communicative ideas for a lesson, but the JTE is using you like a
    tape recorder. I just said that I would of course co-operate with
    the JTE during the lesson, and that I hoped they would be open to
    constructive suggestions made politely after the lesson or when
    planning new ones.

    Second, I was curious about how much freedom those of you who were
    ALTs had in the classroom. Were you able to create your own
    lesson
    plans at times? Did you have creative input on different
    activities? From what I"ve read, each situation is different - I
    just wanted to know what your personal experiences were. Thanks!


    The exJETs I asked about this said that everything depends on the
    JTE. Some will let you teach the whole thing yourself, and be happy
    for having less work, others see you as a free tape player, and don"t
    really want you taking over their lessons.

    One interviewer did mention that introducing more communicative
    methodology is one of the goals of the JET programme. Whether the JTE
    lets this happen is another matter!

    Matt



  7. #47
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    From:
    <a href="ymsgr:sendIM?dynamisx">
    </a>
    Matt dynamisx@b... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Fri Nov 28, 2003 11:26
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt>I think this is definitely a positive thing. Anime is an accepted and
    major part of Japanese culture. I was asked 5 questions on Japan for
    my pre-interview test, and one was: Name an anime. That you ran an
    international business is even better.

    Matt


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    From:

    hazaaaar hazaaaar@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 2:41
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: other companies for "teaching english in japan"</font>
    <tt>hey guys, it sems i just mised the 2004 JET deadline which is very
    harsh but i still have my heart set on going to teach english in
    japan ater university, which will be the coming summer of 2004
    i was wondering what other reputable, companies there are?
    i know there are LOTS! but i"m havin trouble finding the right one,
    any help or information would be most appreciated.. thanks!


  9. #49
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    From:

    Christopher Ling Shinikenshi@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 3:43
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] other companies for "teaching english in japan"</font>
    <tt>From what I remember, NOVA and Aeon are goods ones to look to as
    alternatives to JET. Nova was on campus at our university in the spring job
    fair so perhaps they have local contacts of some sort.

    -Chris

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    From:

    sjsamurai007 TomMiskey@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 7:14
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Questions...</font>
    <tt>I think one safe way to answer such a question is to tell HOW
    you"d react, not specifically WHAT you"d say. So you might say I"d
    try to give as honest and unbiased an opinions as I could on
    whatever topic was asked... or something like that. How you might
    handle touchy situations is more important than your exact answer to
    a single question. I was occasionally asked about US politics, and I
    tried to give my honest opinions, always stressing that they were
    only my opinions.

    Tom


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Justin! justin@e... wrote:
    I had a couple questions I was hoping the more experienced folks
    could answer...

    First of all, I have read in different sources that there are
    often
    questions in the interview asking how one would respond to
    questions
    dealing with my opinions on the president/the war/other
    controversial issues. I feel that I should give my honest and
    direct opinion along with a justification (if asked for) without
    shoving it down their throats. I know the tendency in Japanese
    Culture is to avoid conflict, and I also prefer to do this, but
    not
    in a way that turns me into an opinionless wishy washy cardboard
    cut-
    out of a person. I"m not confrontational when I give opinions,
    and
    don"t hold mine in higher regard than others". Would the
    interviewers look positively on an outlook such as this?

    Second, I was curious about how much freedom those of you who were
    ALTs had in the classroom. Were you able to create your own
    lesson
    plans at times? Did you have creative input on different
    activities? From what I"ve read, each situation is different - I
    just wanted to know what your personal experiences were. Thanks!

    -Justin


  11. #51
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    From:

    sjsamurai007 TomMiskey@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 7:20
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt>Hi Chris,

    One of my main interests in Japan was Japanese anime and manga. I
    said that during my interview, and they selected me (though I have
    no way of knowing if the comment that I like manga helped, hurt, or
    had no effect...) I collected over 1500 manga during my 2 years
    there, and shipped them all home at the end. All my students knew I
    enjoyed it, and it was often something they enjoyed discussing.
    Plus, some manga and anime is very helpful in learning about
    Japanese culture, language, and lifestyle. So accentuate the
    positive value of it, not the tentacle porn otaku side... ;)

    Tom


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Christopher Ling
    Shinikenshi@h... wrote:
    Hmm...while we are on the subject, here"s a moderately interesting
    question...

    While I was attending university (still am, but anyways) I"ve had
    two
    significant jobs. One is my system administration job at one of
    the
    engineering departments on campus and the other is as vice
    president of a
    company that sells...anime-related stuff.

    Now, before we go too far, I realize that mentioning ANYTHING that
    has to do
    with anime is probably gonna get you sunk faster than emphasizing
    one"s
    great and devout appreciation for say...JPOP or Tokyo-like things,
    but I"m
    wondering if I can still use this position to some benefit on my
    education.

    Here"s my spin. Our company imports Japanese comics (specifically
    fan made
    comics called doujinshi ) for American consumption at
    conventions. Because
    of this, time must be actually spent negotiating prices and that
    sort of
    thing. Hence, I could say that the job is pertinent because it
    shows me how
    to interact with the Japanese on a business level, which one could
    say might
    be analagous to working with Japanese students on an academic
    level.

    So is this useful or not? I honestly care not that much for anime
    and am not
    going to the country for that purpose. And the way I see it, had
    it been any
    other product my company was dealing with, this would actually
    look better.
    Oh well.

    Any thoughts on this would be mightily appreciated. Since tomorrow
    is Turkey
    Day, I"ve got an extra day to edit my application before I send it
    out so
    hopefully you guys can give me some feedback on this.

    Much thanks in advance!

    _________________________________________________________________
    Say goodbye to busy signals and slow downloads with a high-speed
    Internet
    connection! Prices start at less than $1 a day average.
    https://broadband.msn.com (Prices may vary by service area.)


  12. #52
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    From:

    Thomas, Nicholas D nicholas.thomas@i... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 11:46
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: RE: [2004JET] other companies for "teaching english in japan"</font>
    <tt>All these employ people to teach English. Many of them also pay air fares
    over to Japan.

    www.aeonet.com
    www.jetprogramme.org
    www.geoscareer.com
    www.teachinjapan.com (NOVA)
    www.japanbound.com (ECC)
    www.westgate.co.jp

    You might also be interested in the following links, although they don"t
    employ people direct, they do carry adverts for jobs teaching English.

    www.ohayosensei.com
    www.eltnews.com
    www.gaijinpot.com
    www.jobsinjapan.com
    www.eslcafe.com

    Nik

    -----Original Message-----
    From: hazaaaar
    To: 2004JET@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: 29/11/2003 02:41
    Subject: [2004JET] other companies for "teaching english in japan"

    hey guys, it sems i just mised the 2004 JET deadline which is very
    harsh but i still have my heart set on going to teach english in
    japan ater university, which will be the coming summer of 2004
    i was wondering what other reputable, companies there are?
    i know there are LOTS! but i"m havin trouble finding the right one,
    any help or information would be most appreciated.. thanks!


  13. #53
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    From:
    <a href="ymsgr:sendIM?dynamisx">
    </a>
    Matt dynamisx@b... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 3:44
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: other companies for "teaching english in japan"</font>
    <tt>Hi,

    I know what you mean, I was originally planning to go with a private
    company, since I have to wait a year between graduating and going
    with JET. So I looked into it in quite a lot of detail. I"ll make a
    few points which I hope are helpful.

    A) The teaching is different to JET, as in you will have control of
    the whole class, with no other teacher present. The classes will be
    smaller though (4 - 12ish). Also, they use effective, modern teaching
    techniques. With this in mind, I"d heavily recommend taking a
    recognised TEFL course before you go. Especially since the better
    companies won"t hire you otherwise. The less respectable companies
    will chuck you in a classroom with 3 days observation, then expect
    you to teach on your own. The downside is these courses (Trinity
    TESOL, Cambridge CELTA, are the two major ones) take a month full
    time, and cost around £1000. I took the TESOL myself, and I"ll never
    regret it, now I can go anywhere in the world and expect to be able
    to find a teaching job.

    B) The companies vary a lot too. I looked at NOVA first, because they
    had a glossy advert in a graduate magazine. But after a friend joked
    that he"d heard NOVA stood for NO VAcation, I had a closer look. Some
    of their practices are quite dodgy, and I think they are basically
    the McDonald"s of the Japan TEFL world. They take any new graduates,
    with no teaching experience, and staff turnover is high. I think Aeon
    is a bit better, but I didn"t look at them so much.

    For a long time, I planned to go with SaxonCourt, a recruitment
    agency who supplies native British english speakers to Shane English
    Schools Japan. They rarely hire without qualifications, but they have
    a very good reputation among TEFL professionals that I have met. I"m
    sure there is a US equivalent.

    C) Mostly I"d just recommend being careful, you could easily find
    yourself teaching 7 - 8 lessons per day, with little or no training,
    and a year"s contract. Anyone who has taught knows that lessons need
    preparation, and that"s going to be on your own time, so look
    carefully at the maximum contact hours the companies advertise, and
    how much preperation time and training they give. Also look at the
    holiday arrangements, and how they treat national holidays.

    I ditched this idea in the end, because I wanted to get to know my
    students for longer than the common 4 week courses at private
    schools, and I think JET gives more chances for cultural exchange.
    However, if I want to stay in Japan after JET, or if i"m not
    selected, I"ll go the private route as well.

    Hope my waffle helped a bit,

    Matt


  14. #54
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    From:

    ahtsai ahtsai@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 7:50
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: other companies for "teaching english in japan"</font>
    <tt>good day,

    new guy on this list. just thought i"d throw in my two cents.

    NOVA i"ve heard nothing but bad news about them. Everything from them
    treating their teachers (ie you) like crap to stalking you. The
    stalking is a result of the company rule that says you"re not to
    socialize with your students outside of the class. This i believe was
    the reason for a lawsuit against NOVA in Osaka by one of their
    teachers. The teacher"s wife was a student at NOVA. Apparently, NOVA
    stalk/spies on the teachers sometimes to see if they go out and meet
    their students out of the classes.

    My japanese friends who worked at NOVA before said the company treats
    their teachers like crap and advised against working there for any
    reason. Like Matt said, the turn over rate is high...consider that
    they higher around 500+ ppl every year. Even a company like Nintendo
    or Sega doesn"t higher more than 20-30 new employees every year.

    Geos apparently isn"t much different from NOVA. One example that
    another Japanese friend of mine who worked at GEOS told me was how
    the teachers are forced to sell the textbooks GEOS makes even if they
    hate them. Not to mention their service was pretty crap when I went
    to one of the offices and asked them if I could apply for a position.
    They told me to go to the head office in Osaka (note that i was in
    Tokyo at the time).

    ECC and AEON i don"t know much about. ECC appears to be fairly good
    (IE i haven"t heard anything bad about them). AEON is on the JET
    website as an alternative to the JET program. I know there are other
    programs similar to JET that other schools/cities handle themsevles.
    Yokohama apparently has their own ALT program, but it apparently has
    a very bad reputation. If i find information on other ALT/JET
    programs in Japan i"ll post the info here.

    that"s my two cents...

    Andy


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Matt dynamisx@b... wrote:
    Hi,

    I know what you mean, I was originally planning to go with a
    private
    company, since I have to wait a year between graduating and going
    with JET. So I looked into it in quite a lot of detail. I"ll make a
    few points which I hope are helpful.

    A) The teaching is different to JET, as in you will have control of
    the whole class, with no other teacher present. The classes will be
    smaller though (4 - 12ish). Also, they use effective, modern
    teaching
    techniques. With this in mind, I"d heavily recommend taking a
    recognised TEFL course before you go. Especially since the better
    companies won"t hire you otherwise. The less respectable companies
    will chuck you in a classroom with 3 days observation, then expect
    you to teach on your own. The downside is these courses (Trinity
    TESOL, Cambridge CELTA, are the two major ones) take a month full
    time, and cost around ?000. I took the TESOL myself, and I"ll never
    regret it, now I can go anywhere in the world and expect to be able
    to find a teaching job.

    B) The companies vary a lot too. I looked at NOVA first, because
    they
    had a glossy advert in a graduate magazine. But after a friend
    joked
    that he"d heard NOVA stood for NO VAcation, I had a closer look.
    Some
    of their practices are quite dodgy, and I think they are basically
    the McDonald"s of the Japan TEFL world. They take any new
    graduates,
    with no teaching experience, and staff turnover is high. I think
    Aeon
    is a bit better, but I didn"t look at them so much.

    For a long time, I planned to go with SaxonCourt, a recruitment
    agency who supplies native British english speakers to Shane
    English
    Schools Japan. They rarely hire without qualifications, but they
    have
    a very good reputation among TEFL professionals that I have met.
    I"m
    sure there is a US equivalent.

    C) Mostly I"d just recommend being careful, you could easily find
    yourself teaching 7 - 8 lessons per day, with little or no
    training,
    and a year"s contract. Anyone who has taught knows that lessons
    need
    preparation, and that"s going to be on your own time, so look
    carefully at the maximum contact hours the companies advertise,
    and
    how much preperation time and training they give. Also look at the
    holiday arrangements, and how they treat national holidays.

    I ditched this idea in the end, because I wanted to get to know my
    students for longer than the common 4 week courses at private
    schools, and I think JET gives more chances for cultural exchange.
    However, if I want to stay in Japan after JET, or if i"m not
    selected, I"ll go the private route as well.

    Hope my waffle helped a bit,

    Matt


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    From:
    RG Pascual rgpascual@c... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sat Nov 29, 2003 7:35
    pm</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt>Tom,

    I"m glad that being an otaku didn"t count against you... I think that
    is something that Western society has struggled with for a long time
    (accepting Anime and Manga); Here on the States-side, comic books are
    affiliated with childhood and the pre-teen years. Animation is also
    treated as kidstuff . I suppose the advisor who suggested to suppress
    an interest in Anime was merely acting out of that vein of thought.
    Perhaps to someone here, an interest in Anime and Manga may seem
    childish or immature. I think that in our excitement, an interest in
    getting it right sometimes overrides the simple approach to be
    ourselves. After reading many writings, most from former JET
    participants, it is very tempting to believe that there is a
    cookie-cutter approach to getting accepted.

    My 2 yen,
    Rich



    On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 11:20 PM, sjsamurai007 wrote:

    Hi Chris,

    One of my main interests in Japan was Japanese anime and manga. I
    said that during my interview, and they selected me (though I have
    no way of knowing if the comment that I like manga helped, hurt, or
    had no effect...) I collected over 1500 manga during my 2 years
    there, and shipped them all home at the end. All my students knew I
    enjoyed it, and it was often something they enjoyed discussing.
    Plus, some manga and anime is very helpful in learning about
    Japanese culture, language, and lifestyle. So accentuate the
    positive value of it, not the tentacle porn otaku side... ;)

    Tom


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, Christopher Ling
    Shinikenshi@h... wrote:
    Hmm...while we are on the subject, here"s a moderately interesting
    question...

    While I was attending university (still am, but anyways) I"ve had
    two
    significant jobs. One is my system administration job at one of
    the
    engineering departments on campus and the other is as vice
    president of a
    company that sells...anime-related stuff.

    Now, before we go too far, I realize that mentioning ANYTHING that
    has to do
    with anime is probably gonna get you sunk faster than emphasizing
    one"s
    great and devout appreciation for say...JPOP or Tokyo-like things,
    but I"m
    wondering if I can still use this position to some benefit on my
    education.

    Here"s my spin. Our company imports Japanese comics (specifically
    fan made
    comics called doujinshi ) for American consumption at
    conventions. Because
    of this, time must be actually spent negotiating prices and that
    sort of
    thing. Hence, I could say that the job is pertinent because it
    shows me how
    to interact with the Japanese on a business level, which one could
    say might
    be analagous to working with Japanese students on an academic
    level.

    So is this useful or not? I honestly care not that much for anime
    and am not
    going to the country for that purpose. And the way I see it, had
    it been any
    other product my company was dealing with, this would actually
    look better.
    Oh well.

    Any thoughts on this would be mightily appreciated. Since tomorrow
    is Turkey
    Day, I"ve got an extra day to edit my application before I send it
    out so
    hopefully you guys can give me some feedback on this.

    Much thanks in advance!

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    From:

    Christopher Ling Shinikenshi@h... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Sun Nov 30, 2003 12:31
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: [2004JET] Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt>My problem with talking about my job is that from dealing with customers at
    anime conventions, I feel that it seems so easy to lump anyone and everyone
    as part of this otaku /geek crowd. One can argue how anime and manga can be
    on a higher level of intellectual importance and all than American cartoons
    but I honestly couldn"t believe that the JET recruiters would care.

    But yeah, it seems that I am trying to put a real systematic spin on how to
    get into JET. Oh well. It was sent out the day before without the addition
    so here"s hoping my other skills are enough for the job. ;)

    -Chris

    Tom,

    I"m glad that being an otaku didn"t count against you... I think that
    is something that Western society has struggled with for a long time
    (accepting Anime and Manga); Here on the States-side, comic books are
    affiliated with childhood and the pre-teen years. Animation is also
    treated as kidstuff . I suppose the advisor who suggested to suppress
    an interest in Anime was merely acting out of that vein of thought.
    Perhaps to someone here, an interest in Anime and Manga may seem
    childish or immature. I think that in our excitement, an interest in
    getting it right sometimes overrides the simple approach to be
    ourselves. After reading many writings, most from former JET
    participants, it is very tempting to believe that there is a
    cookie-cutter approach to getting accepted.

    My 2 yen,
    Rich



    On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 11:20 PM, sjsamurai007 wrote:

    Hi Chris,

    One of my main interests in Japan was Japanese anime and manga. I
    said that during my interview, and they selected me (though I have
    no way of knowing if the comment that I like manga helped, hurt, or
    had no effect...) I collected over 1500 manga during my 2 years
    there, and shipped them all home at the end. All my students knew I
    enjoyed it, and it was often something they enjoyed discussing.
    Plus, some manga and anime is very helpful in learning about
    Japanese culture, language, and lifestyle. So accentuate the
    positive value of it, not the tentacle porn otaku side... ;)

    Tom

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  17. #57
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    From:
    <a href="ymsgr:sendIM?dynamisx">
    </a>
    Matt dynamisx@b... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Dec 1, 2003 12:53
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt> My problem with talking about my job is that from dealing with
    customers at anime conventions, I feel that it seems so easy to
    lump anyone and everyone as part of this otaku /geek crowd. One
    can argue how anime and manga can be on a higher level of
    intellectual importance and all than American cartoons but I
    honestly couldn"t believe that the JET recruiters would care.

    I"d say that holds for an interview by westerners. However, as far as
    I know, most interview are done by 3 people, all familiar with japan,
    and at least one native. So they all know and understand the
    respectable status of anime and manga in japan.

    I mentioned Hikaru no Go when asked how I got started playing Go,
    and the JTE interviewer recognised it immediately.

    Well, I guess the most important thing is to go with what you"re
    comfortable with.

    Matt

    PS. Any Go players here?



  18. #58
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    From:

    ahtsai ahtsai@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Dec 1, 2003 9:35
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?</font>
    <tt> I"d say that holds for an interview by westerners. However, as far
    as
    I know, most interview are done by 3 people, all familiar with
    japan,
    and at least one native. So they all know and understand the
    respectable status of anime and manga in japan.

    I mentioned Hikaru no Go when asked how I got started playing Go,
    and the JTE interviewer recognised it immediately.

    Well, I guess the most important thing is to go with what you"re
    comfortable with.

    Matt

    PS. Any Go players here?

    From what i understand the interviews (in the US) are generally done
    by 3 or 4 ppl. One from the consolate, one a local member of the
    japanese community, and one a former JET. Some say that they do the
    good-guy-bad-guy thing, but I dont" know for sure. perhaps those of
    you that"s been through the interview can tell us more?

    In regards to Chris" original question, I think most of us in the
    west tends to have a slightly biased view of Japan and their views
    towards anime/manga. Yes that"s the country where it"s from and all
    that. But that doesn"t mean it"s accepted as high art and what not.
    It"s just there, that"s it. It"s still a kids thing. Virtually all of
    my Japanese friends (not the jpn-americans the jpn-jpn ones), point
    out that in Japan it"s still considered weird and geeky to read manga
    and play games for an adult. Hence the title of an otaku as something
    of a geek/nerd. Go watch Otaku no Video if you need an idea.

    In short, manga/anime shows interest in japan yes. But is it treated
    like it"s high art? No. It"s best IMHO to use interest in anime/manga
    as something that got you interested in Japan and led to other
    interested. Like igo (Go).

    Andy
    PS: I dont" play igo...but i want to learn it given the chance and
    yes HikaGo is the reason for me as well ^^;;;


  19. #59
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    From:

    ahtsai ahtsai@y... </font>
    <font size="-0">Date: Mon Dec 1, 2003 10:27
    am</font>
    <font size="-0">Subject: interesting new bit</font>
    <tt>http://www.zakzak.co.jp/top/t-2003_12/1t2003120130.html

    Saw this while browsing though my jpn sites. Basically a news story
    about the results of a hearing in Yamagata Prefecture. The hearing
    was for a 22 year old guy who beat his mother (47) to death with a
    wooden bat as a result of anime.

    Apparently, back in high school, the accused was sympathetic(?) with
    lines like the ultimate result of evolution is destruction from
    Neon Genesis Evangelion. As well as, the idea that mankind are a
    violent creature that destories everything around them . Eventually
    all of this led to his interest in murder. The day that he commmited
    the crime, he was suffeing from problems at work, pushing him over
    the edge and the murder rampage starting with his family.

    The distric attorny (judge?) said that even though they had the
    accused go through psychology tests due to comments like the
    population of mankind needs to be decreased or else... , but he is
    still responsible for the criminal acts that he commited (had to
    fudge the last part of the trans cuz i"m not familiar with all the
    legal terms).

    If i remember correctly, there were also a couple of case in the last
    decade that contributed to a fairly negative image of anime/manga in
    japan. There was one of a boy that cut off his school mate"s head and
    stuck it on a fence about 6 or 7 years ago. As well as the arrest of
    a well known director (the guy that worked on Starblazer i thihnk),
    for illegal arms charges...he had howizer shells as well as enough
    munition for a small army in his car and home. All of this were in
    the last decade.

    Andy



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    From: Peter Honigmann Jr <foleyhonigmann@sbcglobal.net>
    Date: Mon Dec 1, 2003 3:37 pm
    Subject: JET alternatives


    ADVERTISEMENT


    Here is my input on this topic, for what it is worth.


    I worked for a private language school on Miyako island called W.E. Center - which had three other schools on Okinawa. We met with an American working for them in Madison, Wisconsin, and he seemed like a nice enough guy and the job sounded good. And for the most part it was pretty good, compared to what I have heard about the other big programs, most which have been mentioned already. Howvever, there were problems, as well as promises made and not kept.

    The real problem is that no matter how good things sound over here, once you get to Japan and find the reality to be different, you are in a tight spot. It can be difficult to change jobs once you are there, especially if the employer you are working for is your sponsor.

    The only suggestion I have is to speak with others who have worked with some of these programs, you can find a lot of info on the web, and see what they have to say about them. The other option is to work directly for a school that is looking to hire teachers on a JET-like system. Apparently schools will host a JET teacher and then like the idea, but not like the constant change in teachers, and decide to hire people directly.

    For some good opportunities I recommend looking at this web page: http://www.ohayosensei.com/

    They have a lot of job opportunities, some for people already in Japan, but many for others looking to get over there.

    But far and away I still believe the JET program is the best way to go, even though the process takes time, because it is well structured and works pretty well.

    Peter



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    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

    There are 4 messages in this issue.

    Topics in this digest:

    1. Re: other companies for 'teaching english in japan'
    From: "Matt"
    2. Re: other companies for 'teaching english in japan'
    From: "ahtsai"
    3. Re: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?
    From: RG Pascual
    4. Re: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?
    From: "Christopher Ling"



    Message: 1
    Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 15:44:12 -0000
    From: "Matt"
    Subject: Re: other companies for 'teaching english in japan'

    Hi,

    I know what you mean, I was originally planning to go with a private
    company, since I have to wait a year between graduating and going
    with JET. So I looked into it in quite a lot of detail. I'll make a
    few points which I hope are helpful.

    A) The teaching is different to JET, as in you will have control of
    the whole class, with no other teacher present. The classes will be
    smaller though (4 - 12ish). Also, they use effective, modern teaching
    techniques. With this in mind, I'd heavily recommend taking a
    recognised TEFL course before you go. Especially since the better
    companies won't hire you otherwise. The less respectable companies
    will chuck you in a classroom with 3 days observation, then expect
    you to teach on your own. The downside is these courses (Trinity
    TESOL, Cambridge CELTA, are the two major ones) take a month full
    time, and cost around £1000. I took the TESOL myself, and I'll never
    regret it, now I can go anywhere in the world and expect to be able
    to find a teaching job.

    B) The companies vary a lot too. I looked at NOVA first, because they
    had a glossy advert in a graduate magazine. But after a friend joked
    that he'd heard NOVA stood for NO VAcation, I had a closer look. Some
    of their practices are quite dodgy, and I think they are basically
    the McDonald's of the Japan TEFL world. They take any new graduates,
    with no teaching experience, and staff turnover is high. I think Aeon
    is a bit better, but I didn't look at them so much.

    For a long time, I planned to go with SaxonCourt, a recruitment
    agency who supplies native British english speakers to Shane English
    Schools Japan. They rarely hire without qualifications, but they have
    a very good reputation among TEFL professionals that I have met. I'm
    sure there is a US equivalent.

    C) Mostly I'd just recommend being careful, you could easily find
    yourself teaching 7 - 8 lessons per day, with little or no training,
    and a year's contract. Anyone who has taught knows that lessons need
    preparation, and that's going to be on your own time, so look
    carefully at the maximum "contact hours" the companies advertise, and
    how much preperation time and training they give. Also look at the
    holiday arrangements, and how they treat national holidays.

    I ditched this idea in the end, because I wanted to get to know my
    students for longer than the common 4 week courses at private
    schools, and I think JET gives more chances for cultural exchange.
    However, if I want to stay in Japan after JET, or if i'm not
    selected, I'll go the private route as well.

    Hope my waffle helped a bit,

    Matt




    Message: 2
    Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 19:50:01 -0000
    From: "ahtsai"
    Subject: Re: other companies for 'teaching english in japan'

    good day,

    new guy on this list. just thought i'd throw in my two cents.

    NOVA i've heard nothing but bad news about them. Everything from them
    treating their teachers (ie you) like crap to stalking you. The
    stalking is a result of the company rule that says you're not to
    socialize with your students outside of the class. This i believe was
    the reason for a lawsuit against NOVA in Osaka by one of their
    teachers. The teacher's wife was a student at NOVA. Apparently, NOVA
    stalk/spies on the teachers sometimes to see if they go out and meet
    their students out of the classes.

    My japanese friends who worked at NOVA before said the company treats
    their teachers like crap and advised against working there for any
    reason. Like Matt said, the turn over rate is high...consider that
    they higher around 500+ ppl every year. Even a company like Nintendo
    or Sega doesn't higher more than 20-30 new employees every year.

    Geos apparently isn't much different from NOVA. One example that
    another Japanese friend of mine who worked at GEOS told me was how
    the teachers are forced to sell the textbooks GEOS makes even if they
    hate them. Not to mention their service was pretty crap when I went
    to one of the offices and asked them if I could apply for a position.
    They told me to go to the head office in Osaka (note that i was in
    Tokyo at the time).

    ECC and AEON i don't know much about. ECC appears to be fairly good
    (IE i haven't heard anything bad about them). AEON is on the JET
    website as an alternative to the JET program. I know there are other
    programs similar to JET that other schools/cities handle themsevles.
    Yokohama apparently has their own ALT program, but it apparently has
    a very bad reputation. If i find information on other ALT/JET
    programs in Japan i'll post the info here.

    that's my two cents...

    Andy


    --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I know what you mean, I was originally planning to go with a
    private
    > company, since I have to wait a year between graduating and going
    > with JET. So I looked into it in quite a lot of detail. I'll make a
    > few points which I hope are helpful.
    >
    > A) The teaching is different to JET, as in you will have control of
    > the whole class, with no other teacher present. The classes will be
    > smaller though (4 - 12ish). Also, they use effective, modern
    teaching
    > techniques. With this in mind, I'd heavily recommend taking a
    > recognised TEFL course before you go. Especially since the better
    > companies won't hire you otherwise. The less respectable companies
    > will chuck you in a classroom with 3 days observation, then expect
    > you to teach on your own. The downside is these courses (Trinity
    > TESOL, Cambridge CELTA, are the two major ones) take a month full
    > time, and cost around ?000. I took the TESOL myself, and I'll never
    > regret it, now I can go anywhere in the world and expect to be able
    > to find a teaching job.
    >
    > B) The companies vary a lot too. I looked at NOVA first, because
    they
    > had a glossy advert in a graduate magazine. But after a friend
    joked
    > that he'd heard NOVA stood for NO VAcation, I had a closer look.
    Some
    > of their practices are quite dodgy, and I think they are basically
    > the McDonald's of the Japan TEFL world. They take any new
    graduates,
    > with no teaching experience, and staff turnover is high. I think
    Aeon
    > is a bit better, but I didn't look at them so much.
    >
    > For a long time, I planned to go with SaxonCourt, a recruitment
    > agency who supplies native British english speakers to Shane
    English
    > Schools Japan. They rarely hire without qualifications, but they
    have
    > a very good reputation among TEFL professionals that I have met.
    I'm
    > sure there is a US equivalent.
    >
    > C) Mostly I'd just recommend being careful, you could easily find
    > yourself teaching 7 - 8 lessons per day, with little or no
    training,
    > and a year's contract. Anyone who has taught knows that lessons
    need
    > preparation, and that's going to be on your own time, so look
    > carefully at the maximum "contact hours" the companies advertise,
    and
    > how much preperation time and training they give. Also look at the
    > holiday arrangements, and how they treat national holidays.
    >
    > I ditched this idea in the end, because I wanted to get to know my
    > students for longer than the common 4 week courses at private
    > schools, and I think JET gives more chances for cultural exchange.
    > However, if I want to stay in Japan after JET, or if i'm not
    > selected, I'll go the private route as well.
    >
    > Hope my waffle helped a bit,
    >
    > Matt




    Message: 3
    Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 11:35:03 -0800
    From: RG Pascual
    Subject: Re: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?

    Tom,

    I'm glad that being an "otaku" didn't count against you... I think that
    is something that Western society has struggled with for a long time
    (accepting Anime and Manga); Here on the States-side, comic books are
    affiliated with childhood and the pre-teen years. Animation is also
    treated as "kidstuff". I suppose the advisor who suggested to suppress
    an interest in Anime was merely acting out of that vein of thought.
    Perhaps to someone here, an interest in Anime and Manga may seem
    childish or immature. I think that in our excitement, an interest in
    "getting it right" sometimes overrides the simple approach to be
    ourselves. After reading many writings, most from former JET
    participants, it is very tempting to believe that there is a
    cookie-cutter approach to getting accepted.

    My 2 yen,
    Rich



    On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 11:20 PM, sjsamurai007 wrote:

    > Hi Chris,
    >
    > One of my main interests in Japan was Japanese anime and manga. I
    > said that during my interview, and they selected me (though I have
    > no way of knowing if the comment that I like manga helped, hurt, or
    > had no effect...) I collected over 1500 manga during my 2 years
    > there, and shipped them all home at the end. All my students knew I
    > enjoyed it, and it was often something they enjoyed discussing.
    > Plus, some manga and anime is very helpful in learning about
    > Japanese culture, language, and lifestyle. So accentuate the
    > positive value of it, not the "tentacle porn otaku" side... ;)
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    > --- In 2004JET@yahoogroups.com, "Christopher Ling"
    > wrote:
    >> Hmm...while we are on the subject, here's a moderately interesting
    >> question...
    >>
    >> While I was attending university (still am, but anyways) I've had
    > two
    >> significant jobs. One is my system administration job at one of
    > the
    >> engineering departments on campus and the other is as vice
    > president of a
    >> company that sells...anime-related stuff.
    >>
    >> Now, before we go too far, I realize that mentioning ANYTHING that
    > has to do
    >> with anime is probably gonna get you sunk faster than emphasizing
    > one's
    >> great and devout appreciation for say...JPOP or Tokyo-like things,
    > but I'm
    >> wondering if I can still use this position to some benefit on my
    > education.
    >>
    >> Here's my spin. Our company imports Japanese comics (specifically
    > fan made
    >> comics called "doujinshi") for American consumption at
    > conventions. Because
    >> of this, time must be actually spent negotiating prices and that
    > sort of
    >> thing. Hence, I could say that the job is pertinent because it
    > shows me how
    >> to interact with the Japanese on a business level, which one could
    > say might
    >> be analagous to working with Japanese students on an academic
    > level.
    >>
    >> So is this useful or not? I honestly care not that much for anime
    > and am not
    >> going to the country for that purpose. And the way I see it, had
    > it been any
    >> other product my company was dealing with, this would actually
    > look better.
    >> Oh well.
    >>
    >> Any thoughts on this would be mightily appreciated. Since tomorrow
    > is Turkey
    >> Day, I've got an extra day to edit my application before I send it
    > out so
    >> hopefully you guys can give me some feedback on this.
    >>
    >> Much thanks in advance!
    >>
    >
    >

    Message: 4
    Date: Sat, 29 Nov 2003 16:31:34 -0800
    From: "Christopher Ling"
    Subject: Re: Re: Japanese animation related employment. Beneficial or not?

    My problem with talking about my job is that from dealing with customers at
    anime conventions, I feel that it seems so easy to lump anyone and everyone
    as part of this "otaku"/geek crowd. One can argue how anime and manga can be
    on a higher level of intellectual importance and all than American cartoons
    but I honestly couldn't believe that the JET recruiters would care.

    But yeah, it seems that I am trying to put a real systematic spin on how to
    get into JET. Oh well. It was sent out the day before without the addition
    so here's hoping my other skills are enough for the job. ;)

    -Chris

    >Tom,
    >
    >I'm glad that being an "otaku" didn't count against you... I think that
    >is something that Western society has struggled with for a long time
    >(accepting Anime and Manga); Here on the States-side, comic books are
    >affiliated with childhood and the pre-teen years. Animation is also
    >treated as "kidstuff". I suppose the advisor who suggested to suppress
    >an interest in Anime was merely acting out of that vein of thought.
    >Perhaps to someone here, an interest in Anime and Manga may seem
    >childish or immature. I think that in our excitement, an interest in
    >"getting it right" sometimes overrides the simple approach to be
    >ourselves. After reading many writings, most from former JET
    >participants, it is very tempting to believe that there is a
    >cookie-cutter approach to getting accepted.
    >
    >My 2 yen,
    >Rich
    >
    >
    >
    >On Friday, November 28, 2003, at 11:20 PM, sjsamurai007 wrote:
    >
    > > Hi Chris,
    > >
    > > One of my main interests in Japan was Japanese anime and manga. I
    > > said that during my interview, and they selected me (though I have
    > > no way of knowing if the comment that I like manga helped, hurt, or
    > > had no effect...) I collected over 1500 manga during my 2 years
    > > there, and shipped them all home at the end. All my students knew I
    > > enjoyed it, and it was often something they enjoyed discussing.
    > > Plus, some manga and anime is very helpful in learning about
    > > Japanese culture, language, and lifestyle. So accentuate the
    > > positive value of it, not the "tentacle porn otaku" side... ;)
    > >
    > > Tom

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