Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23

Thread: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1

    Default I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    Hi,

    I'm looking at JET for 2010 and want to start learning Japanese now. Does anyone know someone in Boston who tutors/teaches Japanese? Or at least someone who I can meet with for a weekly conversation?

    Feel free to send me a PM.

    Thanks!
    Aaron

  2. #2
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    Are you in school?
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    Before I came I found a tutor on Craigslist.

  4. #4

    Default

    Hi there. Thanks to read.
    I have lived in Boston for about 8 month now.

    My Japanese is still terrible. So, I want to learn Japanese more.
    Please help me.

  5. #5
    Member Victorius~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ansan, South Korea
    Posts
    83

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    I work at a computer lab dedicated specifically to fostering independent language learning, and my favorite resource I've found so far has to be WordChamp:
    http://www.wordchamp.com/lingua2/Home.do
    It's free and you can create your own flashcards by just inputting the English word and choosing what translation you want to study. You can study a ton of languages there, but Japanese typically has less resources than European languages, for example. Good luck!
    Last edited by Victorius~; April 15th, 2009 at 06:18. Reason: couble-checking link
    "Judging the mistakes of strangers is an easy thing to do - and it feels pretty good."
    - the thoughts of K in Sputnik Sweetheart

  6. #6
    Senior Member Yeti99's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Hokuriku
    Posts
    290

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    The Boston Language Institute in Kenmore Square has a lot of language classes, but I think they are pretty expensive. I remember seeing beginner Japanese offered in Cambridge at an adult education school. It's been a few years, so I forgot the name, but I remeber they were in Harvard Square.
    Mark it zero!

  7. #7

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    You're going from scratch pretty much, right?

    1) Learn kana and the correct pronunciations of each. Get the stroke order correct. You can find it online...I remember a great tutorial at thejapanesepage.com or something like that presented them in order, gradually spelling out words with the so-far-learned kana while they did it.
    2) Get "Genki", a good Japanese book. (There are other good ones, too.)
    3) Get on Lang-8 and bang together a few sentences, then see what corrections you get. Return the favor by correcting some people's English. You can also practice sounding out the characters, or your sentences...there's a feature for posting audio/video.
    4) Pick up a kanji book; learn the first hundred with correct stroke order via rote memorization.
    5) Get Slime Forest and start learning the rest at an accelerated pace with mnemonics.

    At all steps, use Anki to record what you learn and keep reviewing it.

  8. #8
    Member Victorius~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ansan, South Korea
    Posts
    83

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    If you're just working on getting into Japanese for keeps remember to try the technique of association. For example, the "Nakama" textbooks use picture associations for each hiragana and it can really help in the times of stress when you forget something. Makes sense, really, that having two things in your head to help you remember something is better than one.
    "Judging the mistakes of strangers is an easy thing to do - and it feels pretty good."
    - the thoughts of K in Sputnik Sweetheart

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    I definitely recommend looking for a tutor too. Most of your work will be in your own, but having the tutor will help a whole lot. Self study is great and probably will work here, but extremely hard back in America. You want to learn good pronunciation in the beginning. Hope you find a tutor or go to a class, preferably with a native speaker.

  10. #10
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    Why is self study hard in America?
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Victorius~ View Post
    If you're just working on getting into Japanese for keeps remember to try the technique of association. For example, the "Nakama" textbooks use picture associations for each hiragana and it can really help in the times of stress when you forget something. Makes sense, really, that having two things in your head to help you remember something is better than one.
    Woowoo Nakama! Hatasa is awesome, and if you're willing to study, so are the two Nakama books. The only problem I had with them was that they didn't teach much kanji at all. I think after the first one, students only learn about 50, and the second only teaches a couple hundred. It might be best to add something like Basic Kanji Book if you take the Nakama route.

  12. #12
    Member Victorius~'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ansan, South Korea
    Posts
    83

    Default

    I agree with Eira~
    The Basic Kanji Book is solid, too, and introduces new kanji with compound words that it is already used in. Works well, imo
    "Judging the mistakes of strangers is an easy thing to do - and it feels pretty good."
    - the thoughts of K in Sputnik Sweetheart

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    I love the Basic Kanji Book.

  14. #14

    Default Re: I live in Boston and want to learn Japanese

    Wow are the Nakama books really in the US$70 dollars range? I looked it up on Amazon.

  15. #15
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by millerclark19 View Post
    I want to learn Japanese more.
    .
    Do you also want to learn English more?
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  16. #16

    Default

    Well, I realize this post is far from new, but since I did most of my Japanese studies in Boston I will point you in a few directions others did not mention. First of all I studied Japanese at the Boston Language Institute, which I realize has been mentioned already in this thread. The problem with the Boston Language Institute is like any school, you can get a great teacher, or a really terrible one. I have had both at that school, but that doesn't mean you won't have excellent luck there.
    One thing to mention about BLI, is that they focus mostly on spoken Japanese, and not so much on writing, or reading kanji. They will teach you kana and have you practice reading kana, but that is the extent of it.

    Another place that teaches Japanese in Boston is the Harvard Exchange at Harvard University. You don't need to be a Harvard student in order to join these classes. From what I hear these classes are more thorough but focus more on writing and reading than conversation. They also seem to progress slower than the BLI classes.

    Another place to look into is a website called meetup.com. Boston has one of my most active, friendly, and large Japanese and English Conversation groups, anywhere. Every other saturday, every thursday and every tuesday there are meetings in that group where native Japanese speakers and native English speakers get together and do language exchanges in enviornments ranging from bars, to cafes, and food courts. This is an excellent opportunity to make many Japanese friends who can help you either learn Japanese, or help you practice the Japanese you have already studied.

    If you have any other questions concerning this, feel free to PM me.

  17. #17
    Senior Member 3ngrishsensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    922

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wakatta View Post
    You're going from scratch pretty much, right?

    1) Learn kana and the correct pronunciations of each. Get the stroke order correct. You can find it online...I remember a great tutorial at thejapanesepage.com or something like that presented them in order, gradually spelling out words with the so-far-learned kana while they did it.
    2) Get "Genki", a good Japanese book. (There are other good ones, too.)
    3) Get on Lang-8 and bang together a few sentences, then see what corrections you get. Return the favor by correcting some people's English. You can also practice sounding out the characters, or your sentences...there's a feature for posting audio/video.
    4) Pick up a kanji book; learn the first hundred with correct stroke order via rote memorization.
    5) Get Slime Forest and start learning the rest at an accelerated pace with mnemonics.

    At all steps, use Anki to record what you learn and keep reviewing it.
    wow. you seem to have a wealth of good self-study resources!
    hijacking your information.
    thanks!

  18. #18

    Default

    hey millerclark19 you can learn Japanese online.There are some website which is very good.you can refer this .....Ok i will tell you some of these.these are very useful website

    www.learnjapanesefree.com/

    www.studyjapanese.org


    Last edited by brad12; August 21st, 2010 at 13:58.

  19. #19
    Senior Member 3ngrishsensei's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Japan
    Posts
    922

    Default

    Also, for kanji study ...
    I'm sure this site has been posted somewhere on here before- maybe even in this thread (too lazy to check), but I'm really addicted to this site lately. Reviewing the Kanji

  20. #20

    Default

    I'd like to add to 3ngrish's comment that I don't think Reviewing the Kanji is useful for those who aren't doing Heisig's Remembering the Kanji. (Correct me if I'm wrong?)

    If you're interested in trying the Heisig method, definitely use Reviewing the Kanji. It's overwhelming to come up with 2000+ mnemotic stories alone, and there are some really clever folks at that site whose stories helped me tremendously.

    That said, however, I don't think Heisig is good for beginners.
    犬に小判

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •