Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 33 of 33

Thread: Phonics Tricks Arsenal

  1. #21
    Senior Member loljapan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Japanland
    Posts
    1,340

    Default Re: Phonics Tricks Arsenal

    Have any of you guys tried using those phonics tree things to check their listening comprehension of the phonetics? My JTE wants us to start doing phonics practice the first five minutes of class and I'm thinking of maybe doing one as part of the practice.
    Last edited by loljapan; May 8th, 2009 at 21:43. Reason: e

  2. #22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by loljapan View Post
    Have any of you guys tried using those phonics tree things to check their listening comprehension of the phonetics? My JTE wants us to start doing phonics practice the first five minutes of class and I'm thinking of maybe doing one as part of the practice.
    I have never done this, but it sounds like a good activity to me.

    However, if these kids haven't really been taught pronunciation or phonics before, I would recommend doing that first. If possible, I recommend a full lesson devoted to learning the alphabet's basic pronunciation and the fundamentals of phonics: that you can slap letters together to make words, and decode written words into sounds. (The blackboard karuta game has been a real hit every time I've done it, in elementary and JHS.)

    At the very least, I suggest you teach them the sounds that you'll be using for the minimal pairs exercise or whatever it's called.
    Quote Originally Posted by katsudon View Post
    Principal: 'genki no nai shapenaa'
    Me: *giggle*
    Principal (turns to me, says): Very old sharpener. I am not as old as that sharpener.

  3. #23
    Senior Member loljapan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Japanland
    Posts
    1,340

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Wakatta View Post
    I have never done this, but it sounds like a good activity to me.

    However, if these kids haven't really been taught pronunciation or phonics before, I would recommend doing that first. If possible, I recommend a full lesson devoted to learning the alphabet's basic pronunciation and the fundamentals of phonics: that you can slap letters together to make words, and decode written words into sounds. (The blackboard karuta game has been a real hit every time I've done it, in elementary and JHS.)

    At the very least, I suggest you teach them the sounds that you'll be using for the minimal pairs exercise or whatever it's called.
    Unfortunately I can't spend a full lesson doing phonics with them. This is just some bs the head teacher has decided we should do for the first five minutes of class before we begin whatever the unit is. Most of the kids already have good pronunciation though so I guess this is going to be more of a "Alright kids, let's practice what most of you already know anyway." I figured we'd practice whatever the sound group was for the day for the first 4 minutes and then do the tree for the last minute.

  4. #24
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    134

    Default

    great thread. got some questions though... (sorry for the noob q's)

    1)what is a schwa? is it the name of a letter of the phonetic alphabet?
    2)Is IPA the name of the phonetic alphabet? What does it stand for?
    3) loljapan: what is the tree? game? pls explain
    4)wakatta: what is your blackboard karuta?

    I have shaken off the eigo Note shackles at some schools and can do my own lessons again. Anyways, on Friday I have to do the lower-case alphabet and thought it'd be perfect to introduce phonetics and small words. I was planning on doing a blackboard karuta game so I was wondering if I had thought of the same thing as you did, wakatta. I plan on having 2 kids up to the front facing away from the board. They each hold a flyswatter and I write a lower-case 'a', an uppercase A and maybe some other letters. When I say the letter they spin around and smack the correct one.

  5. #25

    Default Re: Phonics Tricks Arsenal

    No problem! I really should repackage this all in a more professional format, with some activity ideas. It's been on my to-do list for a while...but if you're planning on doing this on Friday, that gives me motivation to get it together sooner rather than later.

    1) "Schwa" is a phonetic term for a very weak vowel, usually a "central" vowel. Like the "a" in "about" or the "e" in "the". (Assuming you aren't stressing either word.) Kind of an "uh" sound. In IPA, it's written as ə. If you look at dictionary entries, you'll probably see at least a schwa or two in longer words. Apparently, it's the most common vowel sound in the English language. I probably wouldn't teach it in elementary school (at least not at first), since it's a bit tricky (and doesn't have a letter of its own), but I do teach it in JHS.
    2) It's the name of a phonetic alphabet. It stands for "International Phonetic Alphabet". New Horizon seems to use IPA. (Although some of its choices for word pronunications seem a bit strange.)
    3) If I can jump in (loljapan, correct me if I'm wrong): this is a "minimal pairs exercise". You basically have a branched tree thing, spreading towards the bottom. Each step, you read off one of two similar words (they differ in a single sound). E.g., you might start with "bed" and "bad"; if they think you said "bed", they move down the left branch, else they move down the right branch. Then, "light", and "right", or "very" and "berry", etc. Along the bottom are numbers: they report what number they got to see how accurate they were.
    Example: http://www.doken.hokkaido-c.ed.jp/ke...te/mintree.htm

    4) I write all the letters we've covered on the board. (I don't mix capitals and lower-case; I usually stick with one) So the board might look like:

    a d c
    b f e

    I then make teams...usually 4 teams. I hand out flyswatters or markers or whatever they'll be striking the board with. I then call out a representative from each team. I have them face the board; I figure the more time they're looking at the letters and trying to remember their sounds, the better! In fact, I often have the kids crouch down in front of the blackboard, so the rest of the class can see the letters. I demonstrate how it's played, and then! I begin. I give a point to team of the first kid to hit a letter. (Close calls are janken'd, or if there's more than two contenders, I just say, "too close!" and redo with a new letter.) I usually do like 5 iterations per group, then send them back for the next group of kids.

    I play it in four phases:
    a) name of the letter: e.g. for f I say "eff!" and for "a" I say "ay". I don't spend that much time on this
    b) the letter's basic sound (and again, stress that this is the -basic- sound the letter makes; there are others): e.g. for f I say "ffffffffffff" and for "s" I say "sssssss". For "b" I say "b(uh) or "b b b b b b b b".
    c) I say a word, they hit the letter corresponding to the first sound in the word. E.g. for "c" I say "cat", for "d" I say "diabolical". It doesn't matter how hard the word is, because they're just listening for the first sound. "city" would count as an "s" because that's the -sound-. (Not that it matters much, but I don't usually use such examples.)
    d) the same as "c", but with the last sound in a word. E.g. "give" --> "v", base" --> "s", "dog" --> "g".
    Quote Originally Posted by katsudon View Post
    Principal: 'genki no nai shapenaa'
    Me: *giggle*
    Principal (turns to me, says): Very old sharpener. I am not as old as that sharpener.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    134

    Default

    hey wakatta - thanks for that! actually as soon as I wrote that last post and went back to my desk I remembered to check my dictionary for schwa and there it was <slaps forehead>. Thanks for the explanation though. I didn't realize it was the most common vowel sound in the English language.

    Ah, the tree game - I know it, just never knew that was the name.
    Interesting variations on the flyswatter game. I think I'll incorporate some into my version. Don't you find that with 4 kids whacking at once it's hard to pick a winner?
    Last edited by Banana Hammock; May 19th, 2009 at 18:02.

  7. #27
    Senior Member ampersand's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    The august land of 10,000 islands.
    Posts
    565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Banana Hammock View Post
    Don't you find that with 4 kids whacking at once it's hard to pick a winner?
    I use cheap uchiwa. Whoever is on the bottom was there first. Sliding your fan underneath someone else's is one of the few things that I specifically prohibit.
    "I have ... relations... with many of the students." -- Sai1

  8. #28
    Senior Member loljapan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Japanland
    Posts
    1,340

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Banana Hammock View Post
    3) loljapan: what is the tree? game? pls explain
    Stuff like this: http://creativechalk.com/materials/phonics-trees

  9. #29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Banana Hammock View Post
    Ah, the tree game - I know it, just never knew that was the name.
    Interesting variations on the flyswatter game. I think I'll incorporate some into my version.
    Thanks! Yeah, I find it works really great. The kids reeeeeaaaallly go crazy for it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Banana Hammock View Post
    Don't you find that with 4 kids whacking at once it's hard to pick a winner?
    Not really. Most of the kids can't -instantly- connect, say, "d-d-d-d-d" (that's the "d" sound, by the way, not "dee dee dee dee dee") to "d"...at least, not at first. If they're nailing each one simultaneously, you might want to consider adding more letters. Certainly, if you have (say) both "a" and "e" on the board, they'll need to think for a second at first. If they are getting the "sound" questions perfectly, I suggest it's time to move on to the "word" versions.

    An additional rule that I sometimes add in: they only get -one- whack each, and if they're wrong, they're out of luck for that question. It encourages them to really, really think rather than just whacking their first guess, then their second, and so on.
    Last edited by Wakatta; May 19th, 2009 at 20:03.
    Quote Originally Posted by katsudon View Post
    Principal: 'genki no nai shapenaa'
    Me: *giggle*
    Principal (turns to me, says): Very old sharpener. I am not as old as that sharpener.

  10. #30
    Senior Member loljapan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Japanland
    Posts
    1,340

    Default Re: Phonics Tricks Arsenal

    Yeah I've always had good results with the fly swatter game. Even high school kids gets into it.

  11. #31

    Default Re: Phonics Tricks Arsenal

    Okay, I didn't get around to writing up that polished, professional-looking lesson plan after all today. Anyway, here are some quick notes for BananaHammock, in case they're useful:

    -What I usually do for phonics-

    Start off with a brief explanation: phonics is the connection between letters and sounds. Today, we're going to learn some letters and their basic sounds. Stress that they do often have other sounds (especially vowels) but today we'll learn the basic sounds. Stress two things: "name" and (basic) "sound". You can say "name" and "sound" in English or just use Japanese (名前/音)...whatever.

    I suggest just grabbing A-H or whatever: some reasonable stretch of letters, preferably sequential ones. (I sometimes also sneak in "th" or whatnot if it's come up in other situations.)

    I start by doing one letter at a time and having them do its sound. (See above.) I often combine them into simple two-letter combinations:

    a --> ab/ba ac/ca ad/da af/fa etc.
    e --> eb/be (etc.)

    Always using their -basic sound-. (This is not necessarily phonetically correct, but the goal here is to practice the sounds, not necessarily the phonetic rules at first.)

    Then make simple three letter words: consonant-vowel-consonant. e.g. "dad". Start off by sounding them out with the kids. Then move on to having them pronounce them. I often find it useful to sort of "conduct" them, especially with continuous sounds. E.g.

    faf
    fffffffffffaaaaaafffffff

    I often do a bit of a thing with my hand...like I have it run along a baseline for the first "F", then lift for the "A", then drop back down for the "F". You can be creative with this: e.g., for harder stops like a "b" or "c", instead of moving the hand down to a smooth plain, you can have it smack into your other hand to convey the "sharp" feeling of the stop.

    You should definitely progress beyond helping them like this and into just writing up three-letter combos and having the kids guess their sound. If they have trouble, help them by like asking, "Okay, sound?" and pointing at the first letter, then the second, and so on.

    Then do the karuta game.

    I sometimes like to finish by inviting them all to run up to the chalkboard to scribble their own consonant-vowel-consonant words up.

    Anyway, have fun! I am going to bed.
    Quote Originally Posted by katsudon View Post
    Principal: 'genki no nai shapenaa'
    Me: *giggle*
    Principal (turns to me, says): Very old sharpener. I am not as old as that sharpener.

  12. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    134

    Default

    thanks wakatta

  13. #33

    Default Re: Phonics Tricks Arsenal

    Update: Under the Articles section of the site, I've revised the ES lesson plan and added a JHS worksheet. A version of this "Phonics Tricks Arsenal" is also posted up there.
    Quote Originally Posted by katsudon View Post
    Principal: 'genki no nai shapenaa'
    Me: *giggle*
    Principal (turns to me, says): Very old sharpener. I am not as old as that sharpener.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •