Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Manga/Videogame question

  1. #1
    ITIL's Favorite Beaner! Gusuke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    The Japanese version of the Central Valley
    Posts
    8,362

    Default Manga/Videogame question

    When I'm playing a game or reading manga, how come some words are written in Japanese, but with katakana on top?

    A good example is the word shotgun:


    散弾銃, with ショットガン written in katakana above the word.

    Is this usually reserved for rarer kanji, or is just for stylistic reasons?

  2. #2
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    I am not sure.

    I know some songs that do that too.

    Like- 楽園、パラダイス
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  3. #3
    VIP Coollead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Yes We Kansai!
    Posts
    8,855

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gusuke View Post
    When I'm playing a game or reading manga, how come some words are written in Japanese, but with katakana on top?

    A good example is the word shotgun:


    散弾銃, with ショットガン written in katakana above the word.

    Is this usually reserved for rarer kanji, or is just for stylistic reasons?
    Happens a lot in songs too, or so I've noticed in Karaoke. Sometimes, they just wanted to use a word with an identical meaning to the kanji...probably why it's katakana instead of hiragana.

  4. #4
    VIP UPGRAYEDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tokyo
    Posts
    4,158

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    Style and it happens all the time when loan words and Japanese words meet.

    Watch more movies with subtitles and you'll see tons of it.
    You see, gentlemen, a pimp's love is very different from a square's...
    (郷に入っては郷に従え.)

  5. #5
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UPGRAYEDD View Post
    .

    Watch more movies with subtitles and you'll see tons of it.
    But sometimes in movies they do that to show that it is a pun or rhyme in English.
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Montreal -> Nishinomiya, Hyogo
    Posts
    724

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    The little words across the top are called furigana, and they indicate how a word is pronounced if there's any ambiguity. Most kids' manga have them for every kanji to help the younger readers.

    In your case, it's a stylistic thing. The character is actually saying the English word "shotgun", but since many Japanese readers don't know what that is the kanji "sandanjuu" is written underneath it. Just remember that the furigana is what the character actually SAYS, and the main text is what the character MEANS.


  7. #7
    ITIL's Favorite Beaner! Gusuke's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    The Japanese version of the Central Valley
    Posts
    8,362

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by enrique_suave View Post
    The little words across the top are called furigana, and they indicate how a word is pronounced if there's any ambiguity. Most kids' manga have them for every kanji to help the younger readers.

    In your case, it's a stylistic thing. The character is actually saying the English word "shotgun", but since many Japanese readers don't know what that is the kanji "sandanjuu" is written underneath it. Just remember that the furigana is what the character actually SAYS, and the main text is what the character MEANS.
    I know it's furigana, but I was just wondering if in these cases it's for style reasons.

  8. #8
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    I don't even know the Japanes word, maybe something like 王国 and the furigana for it was "キングダム”


    And in one movie I watched their was an English song that rhymed the words KENTUCKY and UNLUCKY. Kentucky, of course, was written in katakana, but unlucky was written 不幸 (ORWHATREVER) with アンラッキー as the furigana.
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Montreal -> Nishinomiya, Hyogo
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by enrique_suave
    The little words across the top are called furigana, and they indicate how a word is pronounced if there's any ambiguity. Most kids' manga have them for every kanji to help the younger readers.

    In your case, it's a stylistic thing. The character is actually saying the English word "shotgun", but since many Japanese readers don't know what that is the kanji "sandanjuu" is written underneath it. Just remember that the furigana is what the character actually SAYS, and the main text is what the character MEANS.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gusuke View Post
    I know it's furigana, but I was just wondering if in these cases it's for style reasons.
    Glad I could help, then.


  10. #10
    magic markers Gezora's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    GANG
    Posts
    22,839

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AliDimayev View Post
    I don't even know the Japanes word, maybe something like 王国 and the furigana for it was "キングダム”


    And in one movie I watched their was an English song that rhymed the words KENTUCKY and UNLUCKY. Kentucky, of course, was written in katakana, but unlucky was written 不幸 (ORWHATREVER) with アンラッキー as the furigana.
    I thought that line was so cool when I was a kid because I'm from Kentucky.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ini View Post
    Only a fool would do a teachers workload for an assistants salary.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    I think it's sometimes also used not just for a rhyme but do something similar to how you can make up totally sci-fi or fantasy words in English that the audience has never heard before but which they can pretty readily guess the meaning of by their components.

    For example, "lightsaber". You know what light is and you know what a saber is. It's not that hard to put two and two together and figure it's some sort of laser sword.

    If I said "aquasaber", you'd probably be able to guess that it's some sort of sword that probably has something to do with water: maybe the blade is somehow made of water or maybe it's a sword meant to be used underwater.

    Now, I could say 水刀 and gloss it as a newly minted Japanese word (みずがたな or すいとう, perhaps, though that latter is apparently a homophone for "waterbottle") but I might also be hip and write 水刀 furigana'd with アクアセーバー.

    I saw the new Harry Potter movie in English with Japanese subtitles recently. Horcrux was 分霊箱 which was furigana'd not as ぶんれいそう or whatever but as ホークラックス. I figure doing it this way lets them use the special word while also giving the audience a good idea of what it means. (Actually, more so than "horcrux" does for most English-speakers.)
    Last edited by Wakatta; July 25th, 2009 at 15:43.
    Quote Originally Posted by katsudon View Post
    Principal: 'genki no nai shapenaa'
    Me: *giggle*
    Principal (turns to me, says): Very old sharpener. I am not as old as that sharpener.

  12. #12
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    Is the hentai comic book featuring the underage girls illegal in the US?
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  13. #13
    I <3 Melon Soda
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Hokkaido
    Posts
    238

    Default

    There are also cases I've seen in song lyrics, where different furigana is used to give the word a double meaning. For example, the singer says "kimi" - that's what fits the meter or sounds good in the song. But, the lyric writer wants to specify WHO the "kimi" is referring to - so they'll write a more specific kanji with a totally different reading, and then just put furigana over it that says "kimi." It's pretty clever, I think!

  14. #14
    Али Димаев AliDimayev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    We all have a reponsibility to continue jihad.
    Posts
    16,604

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    They do stuff like that in Enka too all the time. Like the kanji for ONNA, but with the furigana of 'hito'.
    <a href=http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=3134&dateline=1245615339 target=_blank>http://www.ithinkimlost.com/image.ph...ine=1245615339</a>
    Quote Originally Posted by Hyakuman View Post
    As usual, you all (Aliを除く) have your heads up your asses.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Manga/Videogame question

    weird

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •