View Poll Results: Would you consider having private Japanese tuition?

Voters
9. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes

    9 100.00%
  • No

    0 0%
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Private Japanese Tutor

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Under House Arrest
    Posts
    1,092

    Default Private Japanese Tutor

    My wife and I are looking to return to Japan late next year. She is thinking about offering Japanese tuition to foreigners who wish to improve ther Japanese or learn from scratch.

    I am curious as to how many people would be interested in have a Japanese teacher and how much you believe a reasonable price would be for an hours class.

    Also, if you have a private Japanese teacher now, please can you let me know how much you are charged?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne - Osaka - Felixstowe - Melbourne - Yandina
    Posts
    8,525

    Default Re: Private Japanese Tutor

    you'll be lucky as lots of places have cheap or free community classes with one-on-one tuition. if i couldn't have had that i would have looked for an exchange - english for japanese.
    is your missus a qualified teacher? does she have tutoring experience? is she going to organise the curriculum and plan/prepare materials, or is the student expected to bring along whatever materials he/she is using or wants to use?
    all of those things affect price and the likelihood of getting pupils.

    i would pay 1000 yen an hour for unqualified teacher using my own materials, up to 4000 yen an hour for a qualified teacher who provides materials.

    ETA: she may do better if she targets specific goals, such as people who want to pass the JLPT - even focusing on certain elements of it [e.g. the listening section] i would have paid for an intensive review-type course for the JLPT - say 20,000 yen for a whole day.
    Last edited by wicket; August 26th, 2009 at 22:34. Reason: had an idea
    "Like anyone with a sliver of honesty in them I believe what I find I believe when I wake up each morning."
    Stephen Fry, The stars' tennis balls

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Under House Arrest
    Posts
    1,092

    Default

    Thanks for that Wicket.
    She is not qualified but she does have experience as she teaches classes here. She would make all materials and plan the class etc.

    I was aware that most town halls in Japan have English classes for cheap or free but in my expereince these had been quite large groups and mainly consisted of Chinese factory workers and Fillipino hostesses - but that might just be the case of the ones I attended. I wasn't aware of any offering one-to-one classes.

    The idea about the JLPT is a good one. We will have a look at that.
    Thanks!

  4. #4
    VIP UPGRAYEDD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Tokyo
    Posts
    4,158

    Default

    I don't know.

    There are too many volunteers who are perfectly qualified offering their services for dirt cheap in Japan. I pay a retired teacher 1000 yen for 90 minutes.

    You'd have to bring something very unique to the table to ask for more money than that.
    You see, gentlemen, a pimp's love is very different from a square's...
    (郷に入っては郷に従え.)

  5. #5
    Resident ewok wicket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Melbourne - Osaka - Felixstowe - Melbourne - Yandina
    Posts
    8,525

    Default Re: Private Japanese Tutor

    i was in osaka, hence the one-on-one thing [with volunteers].
    for those in kansai, it's at hirakata community hall BTW on tuesdays, wednesdays and saturdays.
    nicklad - by "qualified" i meant piece of paper and/or experience. make sure she gets lots of references from current pupils and make her a website using them.
    she needs an angle. i think small groups [2-4] is actually better for language acquisition [if speaking is the main aim] than one-on-one, so maybe she could think about that, too.
    Good luck. Who knows, you might get another book out of it!
    "Like anyone with a sliver of honesty in them I believe what I find I believe when I wake up each morning."
    Stephen Fry, The stars' tennis balls

  6. #6
    I <3 Melon Soda
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Hokkaido
    Posts
    238

    Default

    I take local language classes in a small group (3 students). 2 times a month it's taught by unqualified volunteers, and the other 2 times a month it's a retired teacher with experience teaching in both Japanese and American public schools. The classes run by volunteers are free, and the qualified teacher charges 1000 yen an hour.

    I also get private 2-hour lessons once a week from a retired teacher/friend. She's qualified to teach English and is working on her Japanese teaching qualification. She doesn't charge me, except the price of materials.

  7. #7
    OPPORTUNITYISNOWHERE mteacher80's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    I now have a two car garage
    Posts
    6,819

    Default Re: Private Japanese Tutor

    we have a few places here in shiga taht do free one on one hour lessons up to twice a week. they are volunteers so not professional teachers, but all you have to do is call the international association that they are a part of and set up a time and place. the only bad thing about it, and its a very small thing, is that you have to sign up for a news letter and then they try and get you to go to international association shindigs. but it helped me pass my jlpt two years ago.
    ☆★REAL EYES REALIZE REAL LIES★☆

  8. #8
    Senior Member stufflikethat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Land of the mikan
    Posts
    382

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UPGRAYEDD View Post
    There are too many volunteers who are perfectly qualified offering their services for dirt cheap in Japan. I pay a retired teacher 1000 yen for 90 minutes.
    depends on where you go. I was very lucky to find someone in my rural town. It took me almost a year to find someone qualified and could meet me close to where I live.

    If you're planning to live on the country side of Japan, then I think your wife will definitely find some foreigners that could really use her help. If you're planning to move to a decent sized city, then she'll have lots of competition.
    Homophobia is so gay.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Private Japanese Tutor

    Here where I live, there's a community center that charges students 1000y for the entire month. The classes visit on Sundays and last for 2-3 hours. They each have <5 students, which is pretty damned good for the price. Even though it's not one on one, I personally would be a lot more tempted to pay 1000y for 8-10 hours of service than 1000y+ an hour for an unlicensed teacher.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    467

    Default Re: Private Japanese Tutor

    I have a private tutor and I am charged 3500 Yen a lesson. I also tend the free class in my town, but is not nearly as helpful as the private tutor.

  11. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Under House Arrest
    Posts
    1,092

    Default Re: Private Japanese Tutor

    That was what I thought in Japan also Enigmaneo. We had local free classes but I found them little use as classes were large and the teacher was so-so. They tried but classes were too mixed in terms of level meaning the class moved too slow or fast for most.
    I desperately wanted a private Japanese teacher.
    I guess it comes down to a choice really of saving cash and attending the town hall classes or putting your hand in your pocket and hiring a personal tutor.

  12. #12
    Smashes through the wa Miss_igirisu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Mie
    Posts
    7,017

    Default

    Back in Nagoya I paid a private teacher 1man4sen a month for a one hour lesson a week. Those classes were the best things I've done for my Japanese ever.

    Now I pay 500 a month for volunteer classes and they are crap, but I go mainly for the social side as opposed to the Japanese side.
    Quote Originally Posted by tenderRondo View Post
    they said your uk blood has extremely high levels of tea and crumpets in it.
    http://osharejunks.blogspot.com/

  13. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    10,366

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wicket View Post
    you'll be lucky as lots of places have cheap or free community classes with one-on-one tuition. if i couldn't have had that i would have looked for an exchange - english for japanese.
    is your missus a qualified teacher? does she have tutoring experience? is she going to organise the curriculum and plan/prepare materials, or is the student expected to bring along whatever materials he/she is using or wants to use?
    all of those things affect price and the likelihood of getting pupils.

    i would pay 1000 yen an hour for unqualified teacher using my own materials, up to 4000 yen an hour for a qualified teacher who provides materials.

    ETA: she may do better if she targets specific goals, such as people who want to pass the JLPT - even focusing on certain elements of it [e.g. the listening section] i would have paid for an intensive review-type course for the JLPT - say 20,000 yen for a whole day.
    I think those rates are really high, I would pay roughly half of that.

    But then again, perhaps it's accurate for Japan, I have no idea.
    Last edited by Waldroon; September 14th, 2009 at 12:49.
    Quote Originally Posted by tenderRondo View Post
    I always wanted to play black flag football, but there were never enough minorities.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •